PipeChat Digest #4200 - Monday, January 5, 2004
 
Re: hymn tune "New Jerusalem"
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
Re: The Eight Little
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Krebs vs. Bach proof
  by "Ron Troop" <ronnymn@frontiernet.net>
ORGANIST NEEDED
  by "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com>
Re: Krebs vs. Bach proof
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: hymn tune "New Jerusalem"
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Baldwin losing 16'
  by <bruce.shaw@shaw.ca>
Re: Incurable Romantics
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
RE: The Eight Little
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Incurable Romantics
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: taking the time to learn how your OWN fingers work
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Incurable Romantics
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Re: Incurable Romantics
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: The Eight Little
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Re: The Eight Little
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: hymn tune "New Jerusalem"
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: The Eight Little
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Incurable Romantics
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: hymn tune "New Jerusalem" From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 15:31:18 -0500   Well, Bud, I've not read Virgil, Milton, Bunyan, etc. In fact, I had a devil of a = time reading The Inferno! (I don't think I finished it.) So, please excuse me when I say, "Hunh?"   Actually, the Q and A stuff made a modicum of sense for my non-literary mind; the rest is still droning overhead. Perhaps it will land and provide =   illumination when "we have built Jerusalem In England's green and pleasant =   land." Thank you for the attempt at enlightenment, Ross Coulson "Cole" Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA   >What's not generally understood about Blake's text is that it uses a >literary convention of the English metaphysical poets, as well as Latin >poets: the CONCEIT, in which the reader is EXPECTED to answer in the >negative. Readers of Virgil, etc. would have been familiar with the = convention. > >Q - And did those feet in ancient times Walk upon England's mountains = green? >A - Nope. Never happened. > >Q- And was the holy Lamb of God On England's pleasant pastures seen? >A- Nope. Not in THIS reality. > >Etc. > >There have been various interpretations of the poem over the years ... = for >a long time it was thought that the lines > >And was Jerusalm builded her Among those dark satanic mills? > >were a protest against sweat-shops, child labour, etc. > >The punch-line comes in the second verse: > >I will not cease from mental fight, Nor shall my sword sleep in my hand, >Till we have built Jerusalem In England's green and pleasant land. > >Which would seem to give a larger interpretation than the one above. > >Cheers, > >Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: The Eight Little From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 15:40:53 -0600   I thought that would be his opinion. ;-) Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:30:58 -0500 Subject: Re: The Eight Little   > >>> quilisma@cox.net 01/05/04 12:34 PM >>> > > >I think most scholars now believe that Krebs wrote them. > > Actually, Christoph Wolff has done extensive research and has published > this research quite recently. His findings are that Bach did write The > Eight Little, and the evidence is really quite strong. Bach probably > wrote them to teach his son how to play. > > Shelley > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: Krebs vs. Bach proof From: "Ron Troop" <ronnymn@frontiernet.net> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 16:08:21 -0600   Just curious: The first piece, Prelude in C in Volume 2 of the Breitkopf Krebs organ works is XI (p.56) in Volume 2 of the older Widor/Schweitzer Bach organ works. This would lead me to assume there must have been definite proof in this case that Krebs indeed composed this piece and not Bach. (sorry if this is explained in the German foreward of the Breitkopf) or was there some sort of academic consensus that this is obviously a Kreb work?    
(back) Subject: ORGANIST NEEDED From: "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:24:16 -0800   I am seeking an organist based in the greater Los Angeles area to perform the Dubois "Seven Last Words of Christ" with a massed choir at one of my churches, Faith Lutheran in Inglewood, California, on Sunday, March 28 at 4:00 p.m.   This will involve 11 rehearsals plus the performance. See schedule below, at the end of this posting.   The cantata will be presented in a Tenebrae service setting with a narrator interspersing brief scripture readings between the sections of the cantata.   (A Thousand Thanks to List Member Jean Randall of St. Paul's United Methodist Church, Rochester, Michigan, for the Tenebrae Service idea, and a MILLION Thanks for responding in the affirmative to my request to borrow copies of the score -- 57 copies are on their way as we speak!)   We have a nice three-manual, 1957 Casavant of 24 ranks.   Currently, we are offering a total fee of $1000 for this, and if a couple more patrons step forward we might be able to go a little higher (but don't count on that - I am barely able to raise even the thousand).   This is not to say that $1000 is anywhere near the "ideal" remuneration given the time and work involved -- but the church has absolutely zero budget at the present time.   [Indeed, their budget is rather deeply in the red, due to a greatly declining attendance in recent years. I am doing all I can to help reverse that trend by building up their formerly non-existent music ministry.]   The entire fee for the organist will be covered by patrons, and I am waiving any compensation in the interest of seeing the performance happen.   I am hoping someone will be interested in performing this work partially for financial reward and partially for the joy and spiritual reward of doing it.   The Dubois is an excellent choral work, not done much these days, and the organist does have a dramatic solo toward the end of it. I am anticipating a choir of about 50 based on response received thus far.   Please reply to me off-list, ASAP, if you are interested. Thanks very much.   ~ ~~~ ~~~~~~~ Charlie Lester     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     REHEARSAL SCHEDULE   All rehearsals on Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Faith Lutheran =96 unless otherwise noted   January 17 - Soloist Auditions January 24 - First Read-through January 31   February 7 February 14 February 21 February 28   March 6 March 13 March 20   March 27 11:00 a.m. Final Music Rehearsal 12:30 p.m. Light luncheon break 2:00 p.m. Full Run-through w/ narrator   March 28 4:00 p.m. PERFORMANCE All participants will please arrive at 3 p.m.     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D        
(back) Subject: Re: Krebs vs. Bach proof From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 17:53:04 -0500   on 1/5/04 5:08 PM, Ron Troop at ronnymn@frontiernet.net wrote:   > Just curious: The first piece, Prelude in C in Volume 2 of the Breitkopf > Krebs organ works is XI (p.56) in Volume 2 of the older Widor/Schweitzer > Bach organ works. This would lead me to assume there must have been > definite proof in this case that Krebs indeed composed this piece and not > Bach. (sorry if this is explained in the German foreward of the Breitkopf= ) > or was there some sort of academic consensus that this is obviously a Kre= b > work? >=20 > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >=20 >=20 My Breitkopf edition of vol. 2 has an English version, as well as a German one, of the Preface, and it says: "The Praeludium in C Major was considere= d up to now as an organ work by J.S. Bach in the Peters Edition Vol. VIII (no= .. 8) of Bach's Organ Works (BWV 567). Y. Kobayashi has succeeded in identifying the copyist of the manuscript 7327 (Bibliotheque Royale Albert = I in Brussels) as F=E9tis and the composer of the work as J. L. Krebs." A footnote attached to this reads: "see Y. Kobayashi: Neuerkenntisse zu einogen Bach-Quellen an Hand schriftlicher Untersuchungen (Bach-Jahrbuch 1978, p. 43 ff)."     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: hymn tune "New Jerusalem" From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 17:58:19 -0500   Thanks for the explanation. The song (the poem) had always puzzled me!     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu         on 1/5/04 2:43 PM, quilisma@cox.net at quilisma@cox.net wrote:   > What's not generally understood about Blake's text is that it uses a > literary convention of the English metaphysical poets, as well as Latin > poets: the CONCEIT, in which the reader is EXPECTED to answer in the > negative. Readers of Virgil, etc. would have been familiar with the > convention. > > Q - And did those feet in ancient times Walk upon England's mountains = green? > A - Nope. Never happened. > > Q- And was the holy Lamb of God On England's pleasant pastures seen? > A- Nope. Not in THIS reality. > > Etc. > > There have been various interpretations of the poem over the years ... > for a long time it was thought that the lines > > And was Jerusalm builded her Among those dark satanic mills? > > were a protest against sweat-shops, child labour, etc. > > The punch-line comes in the second verse: > > I will not cease from mental fight, Nor shall my sword sleep in my hand, > Till we have built Jerusalem In England's green and pleasant land. > > Which would seem to give a larger interpretation than the one above. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > > > > Another good example is the language of the Five Mystical Songs, texts > by George Herbert. > > Cole wrote: > >> Hello, Will Light, >> I'm a newbie but I checked this tune out on the Cyber Hymnal site. I, >> too, thought the reference was to "Jerusalem" of Monty Python fame. But >> there is a "New Jersalem" tune with a lot of the apocalyptic imagery >> from the Book of the Revelation of St. John the Divine. The usual words >> to "Jerusalem" (spoofed many time on Monty Python's Flying Circus) are, >> I think, by Blake and refer to some fable of Arthurian imagery favored >> by the English. I may be way off base here as the words seem to me to = be >> rather preposterous. (I don't want to offend anyone--especially any of >> my cousins in the UK.) Oh, btw, the tune "Jerusalem" is in the Hymnal >> 1982 (Episcopal-USA) but with a different set of words. I'm not sure >> about 1940 (Episcopal-USA). >> >> Greetings, Gary (Black???), >> Am I correct in thinking that your reference to "New Jerusalem" is the >> hymn and hymntune by Adrian Vermeulen-Miller? Please see this site: >> http://www.cyberhymnal.org/htm/n/e/newjerus.htm to check it out. >> >> Thanks to all for the pleasure of being in this group and allowing me = to >> pipe up. (I am profoundly sorry for that, but I just couldn't resist.) >> Ross Coulson "Cole" Votaw in Springfield, Ohio, USA >> >>> It is just called "Jerusalem" ....Will Light >>> Coventry UK >>> ----------------------------------------------------------- >>> In the movie was a hymn entitled, New Jerusalem? >>> Thanks, Gary >> >> >> >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >> >> >> > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Baldwin losing 16' From: <bruce.shaw@shaw.ca> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 16:01:32 -0700   >Does anyone have any idea as to why the Baldwin at my church would = suddenly loose its 16' in the pedal? I am sorry, but I don't know much = about electronic anything.   Did you lose the 16' on the great as well?   If so, it might be a "divide down" chip in the electronics.   Call a Baldwin-certified repairman so he has the right chip.    
(back) Subject: Re: Incurable Romantics From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 18:22:39 EST   Charlie Lester said: >Particularly since the instruments that he -did- have to >play were -tonally- more related to the H&H than they were >to most of the counterfeited, pseudo-Baroque squawk-boxes >made during the full heat of the "Baroque Revival."   >As for the actions, granted, that's a different matter. But >there are those who maintain that Bach -- a controversial >and innovative musician in his day, rather than being cursed >with the Luddite mentality -- would surely have appreciated >the luxury and convenience of modern electric action.   >Somehow, all things considered, one rather doubts that he >spent a lot of time squatting pensively on the organ bench >drawing stops and listening for the different amounts of >chiff depending on how fast he pressed down on the keys.   I'm glad that I'm not the only one on this list who thinks this way. = Bach's instruments did not and do not resemble the neo-baroque instruments based = on 8'Spitznasongedeckts capped off with VIII-XII SchreechenPfeifen (1/4') and = all short resonator reeds that sound like a swarm of killer bees buzzing in = tin cans, all voiced on 1 3/4" pressure. Bach's organs were and are warm and silvery, not resembling the screechophones that were built during the = 1960's and 1970's.   As to actions, I argue that it is a known fact that Bach always wanted the =   most modern conveniences (including percussions!) on the instruments. = That leads me to believe that he would be designing electric action organs with =   multiple memories; thick, felted swell shades that can muffle a full swell = down to a whisper; pistons galore; and every other modern convenience known, = including MIDI. I wonder if he wouldn't be singing the praises of builders like Schoenstein and several others who have turned back to a heartier, heftier = style of building, not afraid to build instruments with some lumber in the pedal division, and some beefily scaled principal choruses--instruments that = truly deserve the moniker "the King of instruments." This is not to say he would be = wanting all organs to be like some of the "tubs" of the 1920's, but good solidly = built organs with hefty, but clean, choruses, that have power and majesty with quick and responsive electric action, because if he wrote what he did with = tracker action, just think what he could do with EP action.   Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: RE: The Eight Little From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 17:36:36 -0600   Interesting - I never found anything particularly profound about the Little 8, but was aware of Wolff's research positing that they were indeed by JSB. Funny, but I never thought they were good enough for Krebs to be the author!   As one of my former clients said many years ago, "The mind is a terrible thing", particularly mine.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Randolph Runyon   I've been playing a lot of Krebs recently--all his chorale preludes, trios, preludes, fugues--and while he is quite good, he isn't _that_ good. The 8 are not in his style (or styles, as he flits from Bach-ish baroque to galant). Krebs never wrote anything as profound as the E Minor Little Prelude.          
(back) Subject: Re: Incurable Romantics From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 18:08:50 -0600   Monty Bennett wrote:   > As to actions, I argue that it is a known fact that Bach always wanted > = the most modern conveniences (including percussions!) on the >instruments. = That leads me to believe that he would be designing > electric action = organs <snip> every other modern convenience known, > <snip> -instruments that truly deserve the moniker "the King of > = instruments." This is not to say he would be wanting all > organs to be like some of the "tubs" of the 1920's, but good solidly > built organs with hefty, but clean, choruses, that have power and > majesty with quick and responsive electric action,   Were I going to guess, I would think that if Bach were to play an organ like the Altoona Cathedral Steinmeyer, he would think he "arrived"!   I know that I would think that *I* have! I think that organ has nearly everything Monty suggests. . .   Faithfully,   G.A. (Who LOVES building in "German Romantic" tradition!) -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO <>< Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS  
(back) Subject: Re: taking the time to learn how your OWN fingers work From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 16:40:54 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I think I side with Gregory on this.....I always work from urtext editions.   To be absolutely honest, with a sound finger technique, there isn't THAT much in Bach's organ music which requires special or highly complex fingering. The business of articulation is of far greater importance surely, and that starts with the brain.   (The keyboard works are much more difficult IMHO)   I have to confess that, with my time at a premium, I do tend to listen to recordings of two or three very scholarly interpretations of Bach, and follow it with the music. When I come across differences in the notation, I make a not of them......it saves time!   That said, surely the phrasing, musical architecture and articulation are what makes or breaks Bach, and not particular nuances of technique or the use of heels?   I think if I played from a Dupre edition, I would just read it as an unedited version.I personally try to use toes for the most part, because I find it allows a more consistent control over the articulation, but that is purely a personal choice rather than a point of historical performance practice.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Incurable Romantics From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 16:50:48 -0700       Monty Bennett wrote:   As to actions, I argue that it is a known fact that Bach always wanted the most modern conveniences (including percussions!) on the instruments. That leads me to believe that he would be designing electric action organs with multiple memories; thick, felted swell shades that can muffle a full swell down to a whisper; pistons galore; and every other modern convenience known, including MIDI. I wonder if he wouldn't be singing the praises of builders like Schoenstein and several others who have turned back to a heartier, heftier style of building, not afraid to build instruments with some lumber in the pedal division, and some beefily scaled principal choruses--instruments that truly deserve the moniker "the King of instruments." This is not to say he would be wanting all organs to be like some of the "tubs" of the 1920's, but good solidly built organs with hefty, but clean, choruses, that have power and majesty with quick and responsive electric action, because if he wrote what he did with tracker action, just think what he could do with EP action.     My response:   I have no doubt that if Bach were alive today he would make maximum use of the best of modern organ building. (Whether that is Schoenstein, or Rosales, or Fisk, or, or, or, or, is subject to debate.)   HOWEVER, if Bach were alive today he would not be composing Baroque trio = sonatas, Baroque preludes and fugues, Baroque chorale preludes, etc. He would be = composing in his version of A style of our day. Notice, A style, not THE style of today, since there are so many streams.             Monty also wrote:     I'm glad that I'm not the only one on this list who thinks this way. Bach's instruments did not and do not resemble the neo-baroque instruments based on 8'Spitznasongedeckts capped off with VIII-XII SchreechenPfeifen (1/4') and all short resonator reeds that sound like a swarm of killer bees buzzing in tin cans, all voiced on 1 3/4" pressure. Bach's organs were and are warm and silvery, not resembling the screechophones that were built during the 1960's and 1970's.     My response:   While I have certainly heard some extreme examples from the 60's and 70's, I have never heard of an instrument such as you describe above.       Del W. Case Pacific Union College Angwin, CA  
(back) Subject: Re: Incurable Romantics From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 16:55:59 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   No Charlie!!!!   Baroque organs had a particular sound, and it was the buildings which made them good or not so good. If you know, or could know, the Muller in the Waalsekerk, Ansterdam, you will/would know that it is quite ferociously loud and terribly bright.   It's a wonderful organ, but it could do with a better home acoustically.   That was the problem with the baroque copies, which just followed the baroque way of doing things.   I would suggest that many of the baroque copies would sound absolutely magnificent in the church where I play. Indeed, the one I play DOES sound magnificent, but I wouldn't want to hear it in a heavily carpeted USA church!!   Harrison and Harrison organs were way off the Bach mark, and yet, I know exactly what Charlie Lester is getting at. Like Skinner organs, they were always very, very musical instruments in alsmot ANY building.,.....that has to be admired, I think.   Jesus was no romantic....he saw things very clearly and faced the truth. Cecil B de Mille had a lot to answer for.     Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: The Eight Little From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 16:58:12 -0700       Glenda wrote: > > Interesting - I never found anything particularly profound about the > Little 8, but was aware of Wolff's research positing that they were > indeed by JSB. Funny, but I never thought they were good enough for > Krebs to be the author! > > As one of my former clients said many years ago, "The mind is a terrible > thing", particularly mine. >       I never gave any thought to the authorship of the 8 Little until I begin to see various people questioning it. When I began to think about it and look and listen to their content, it seemed rather clear that these were from a different composer. They are not of the same quality or style.   There are works that he specifically designated for the education of his sons, for example the Orgelbuchlein and the Trio Sonatas. These "Teaching pieces" are clearly of the same caliber as the rest of his works whose authorship seems not to be questioned.     Del W. Case Pacific Union College Angwin, CA  
(back) Subject: Re: The Eight Little From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 17:10:12 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Interesting point there, Bud!   I read one paper, by Prof.Turner of Newcastle Uni, here in the UK, which suggested that Bach MAY have come into contact with Italian music first, at the library of the University of Kiel, where Italian musicians visited and worked in the vicinity on a regular basis.   This was the area of the Hanseatic Port region, and may have been a safe haven for travelling musicians. Certainly, there were large houses in the area where music was supported by aristocrats, and church music around Luneberg went on apace.   Religious wars and things were fairly gentlemanly affairs in those days, and I doubt that people suffered constant threat from rampaging clergy.   Of course, religious rivalry did get a bit out of hand in the UK....a church close to me still has canon-ball holes embedded in the outer walls!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- quilisma@cox.net wrote:   > I think most scholars now believe that Krebs wrote > them. > > I would question that an Italian composer wrote > them, unless he had > emigrated to Protestant North Germany ... not too > likely in those times > of almost constant religious strife.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: RE: hymn tune "New Jerusalem" From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 17:15:23 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Blake was probably stark staring mad!   "Jerusalem" is the most ridiculous ditty, and for those who may wish to share the joke, his reference to "dark, satanic mills" was an oblique reference to schools, colleges and universities!   Maybe he wasn't mad after all!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Cole <rcolev@woh.rr.com> wrote:   > The usual > words to "Jerusalem" > (spoofed many time on Monty Python's Flying Circus) > are, I think, by Blake > and refer to some fable of Arthurian imagery favored > by the English. I may > be way off base here as the words seem to me to be > rather preposterous.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: The Eight Little From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 20:14:51 -0500   It's possible that my love for the eight is based on their being the first real organ music I ever studied rather than their intrinsic value. Yet, surely you'd agree that the E minor prelude is sublime? It reminds of the slow middle movement of the Piece in G, which just builds and builds. And joy has rarely been better expressed than in the F major. I wouldn't claim the other six were profound, just the E minor. Says so much in such = little space.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu           on 1/5/04 6:36 PM, Glenda at gksjd85@direcway.com wrote:   > Interesting - I never found anything particularly profound about the > Little 8, but was aware of Wolff's research positing that they were > indeed by JSB. Funny, but I never thought they were good enough for > Krebs to be the author! > > As one of my former clients said many years ago, "The mind is a terrible > thing", particularly mine. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com >    
(back) Subject: Re: Incurable Romantics From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 17:23:58 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I know that Richard admires the Germanic style of romantic organ-building....we have discussed it before, and I admire his stance.   However, Steinmeyer were greatly influenced by the organ reform movement....not that they ever really made a true baroque copy.   Passau is supposed to be a classical style instrument, influenced by, among other, Karl Straube!!   Still, it's an awfully rich sound and an impressive instrument.   Richard knows, as I do, that well into the romantic period, German organ builders stuck to baroque voicing techniques but merely increased the scales. Bach would not, I suspect, have been offended by them.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- Richard Schneider <arpschneider@starband.net> wrote: > Were I going to guess, I would think that if Bach > were to play an organ > like the Altoona Cathedral Steinmeyer, he would > think he "arrived"!     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing. http://photos.yahoo.com/