PipeChat Digest #4202 - Tuesday, January 6, 2004
 
Re: extreme examples from the 60's and 70's
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: The Eight Little
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
A bad room is no excuse (was Re: extreme examples from the 60's and 70's)
  by "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com>
Re: hymn tune
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: hymn tune
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: hymn tune
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Music Search?
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: extreme examples from the 60's and 70's
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: A bad room is no excuse (was Re: extreme examples from the 60's and 7
  by <reedstop@charter.net>
Re: Music Search?
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: A bad room is no excuse (was Re: extreme examples from the 60's and 7
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Music Search?
  by "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
Re: Music Search?
  by "June Edison" <junemax@insightbb.com>
2m5r Geneva Pipe Organ for sale.(cross posted)
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Parrying with nature (Jerusalem)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Bach from the dead? Let's get a Handel on this.....
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: extreme examples from the 60's and 70's From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 12:45:45 +0000 (GMT)   The Baroque "revival" instruments of the 50's and 60's could be pretty awful, but there were some excellent ones as well. As far as action goes, I am sure Bach would have opted for tracker. He was known as a virtuoso performer in his day, not as a composer. Don't let's start this argument again, but good tracker action with electric stop action - direct or pneumatic, allowing the use of aids to registration, is the preferred choice of most virtuosi. Professional recitalists rarely comment on the organ they are playing. They choose a programme suited to the instrument and play it to the best of their ability. Is it possible that the screeching sound some list members have complained about may be a mainly US feature, brought about by the urge to carpet the churches there? A friend of mine who did a recital tour in the US commented somewhat scathingly about this trend. He was told that the "Word of God" must be heard. It has been heard in the Cathedrals and churches in the UK for several hundred years without the benefit of carpeting, amplification or any other help, other than that of good diction and the "sounding board" of the pulpit. John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Opera Censorship and the right to silence   ________________________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends today! Download Messenger Now http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html  
(back) Subject: RE: The Eight Little From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 21:04:53 +0800   I support your remarks 100% Andres. It's a tall poppy syndrome - cut down the biggest. Bach is the biggest!   In my reading, which is extensive, for magazine articles and for theses I have written, I have seen the comment by a historian that Bach was known to have stated that he wrote the Little Preludes and Fugues for the "Glory of God" and that his neighbour may be educated, or words to that effect. As I said before let those who claim that JSB did not write the Eight prove it. Not just presumption but solid proof!   I have some of the works of Krebs and I cannot see any similarity in style. Yes, Andre, didn't you know? Shakespeare's plays were written by a feller named Bacon. I wonder if he knew he wrote them?? Tall poppy again. Experts on all sorts of subjects have a nasty habit of changing their minds! Regards, Bob Elms. (tin hat on head and under the table)   ---- Original Message ---- From: agun@telcel.net.ve To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: RE: The Eight Little Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 17:08:51 -0400   >Andres Gunther >agun@telcel.net.ve > >They weren't composed by Johann Sebastian Bach but by another guy >whose name >incidentally was johann sebastian bach; known as "Hanno the >ghostwriter". >Shakespeare faces exactly the same problem too. > >Tongue in cheek (and nothing personal) >Andres >=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D >First was the cat, then was the Orgler. >The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about. > >(please skip following if you follwed this thread) >----- Original Message ----- >From: <quilisma@cox.net> >To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 1:34 PM >Subject: The Eight Little > > >> >> >> OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com wrote: >> > Dear List, >> > >> > >> (big ol' snip) >> >> Though, my personal feelings are >> > that they [The Eight Little Preludes and Fugues] were written by >an >> > Italian composer of some sort. >> > >> > Sincerely, >> > Christopher J. Howerter, SPC >> > Director of Music >> > St. Paul's Lutheran Church >> > Bethlehem, PA >> > Cell: (610) 462-8017 >> > >> > >> > >> >> I think most scholars now believe that Krebs wrote them. >> >> I would question that an Italian composer wrote them, unless he had >> emigrated to Protestant North Germany ... not too likely in those >times >> of almost constant religious strife. >> >> And Catholic South Germany's pedal organs weren't a WHOLE lot >better >> than the Italians (grin), until a generation later. >> >> Italian pedal-boards WELL into the 19th century consisted of a few >large >> Bourdon pipes for pedal-points in the "good" keys of unequal >> temperament, which were activated by pedals that were in some >cases no >> more than wooden "mushroom" buttons, similar to Iberian organs of >the >time. >> >> Indeed the Serassi family continued that conservative tradition of >> Italian organ-building ... no reeds, single rank breaking upper >octaves >> and mutations on individual sliders, limited pedal ... right into >the >> 20th century, if I'm not mistaken. I think the last Serassi died >around >> 1930. >> >> So there would have been no point in composing pieces that >couldn't be >> PLAYED on Italian organs. >> >> Cheers, >> >> Bud > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related >topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: A bad room is no excuse (was Re: extreme examples from the 60's and 70's) From: "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 05:11:42 -0800 (PST)   The carpet along with acoustic tile should not be an impediment to a builder worth his/her salt. I heard the Robert Sipe instrument in Christ Church Episcopal in San Antonio, TX. The sanctuary has wall to wall carpet and cushioned pews, and the previous instrument was far short of "good". On the other hand the Sipe instrument, mechanical key action, electric actuators on slider chest, was ravishing and convincing from Buxtehude thru the Durufle suite in recital. Spine tingling from first to last note. A real treasure.   What sits on top of the windchest is as or more important than what is inside it. The good builder has the skill to scale and voice the instrument to fit the room acoustic, rather than slavishly mimicking the techniques of the past in a historically informed but ultimately inappropriate-for-the-venue fashion.   Cruel but true: a bad room acoustic is no excuse. If you find a screechy instrument, it merely demonstrates that the builder doesn't have the technique to deliver musical instruments.   My $0.02,   -Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: hymn tune From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 21:11:23 +0800   I have no doubt at all as to the allusion of Blake in "Jerusalem". He was one of the reformers who were appalled at the use of child labour in factories and coal mines.   "The dark satanic mills" were the factories and the prayer of the song was that the spirit of the Lord would help in cleaning out this type of sweated labour of children.   This hymn is included in some hymn books including the Sunday School Hymn book of the English Methodist Church published in the 1930s. Bob Elms. ---- Original Message ---- From: runyonr@muohio.edu To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: hymn tune "New Jerusalem" Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 17:58:19 -0500   >Thanks for the explanation. The song (the poem) had always puzzled >me!   >Randy Runyon >Music Director >Zion Lutheran Church >Hamilton, Ohio >runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: RE: hymn tune From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 21:13:24 +0800   You can't really believe that can you Colin? You will be battling to find any backing for that theory! Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: RE: hymn tune "New Jerusalem" Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 17:15:23 -0800 (PST)   >Hello, > >Blake was probably stark staring mad! > >"Jerusalem" is the most ridiculous ditty, and for >those who may wish to share the joke, his reference to >"dark, satanic mills" was an oblique reference to >schools, colleges and universities! > >Maybe he wasn't mad after all!! > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK > > >-    
(back) Subject: RE: hymn tune From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 21:13:25 +0800   You can't really believe that can you Colin? You will be battling to find any backing for that theory! Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: RE: hymn tune "New Jerusalem" Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 17:15:23 -0800 (PST)   >Hello, > >Blake was probably stark staring mad! > >"Jerusalem" is the most ridiculous ditty, and for >those who may wish to share the joke, his reference to >"dark, satanic mills" was an oblique reference to >schools, colleges and universities! > >Maybe he wasn't mad after all!! > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK > > >-    
(back) Subject: Music Search? From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 08:52:02 -0500   A good friend of mine sent me this today...can anyone help?   looking for the correct name and publisher of the music.     "I'm trying to find the title of an organ piece with winds by Richard Strauss. Apparently it's the only organ thing he ever did - 'believe it takes brasses (perhaps woodwinds??). It might have the word celebration or commemoration in the title."       Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: Re: extreme examples from the 60's and 70's From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 08:17:01 -0600   Hello, John, et al: You wrote: > Don't let's start this argument again... We are not now discussing organ action, for you wrote: > A friend of mine who did a recital tour in the US > commented somewhat scathingly about this trend. > He was told that the "Word of God" must be > heard. It has been heard in the Cathedrals and > churches in the UK for several hundred years without > the benefit of carpeting, amplification or any other > help, other than that of good diction and the > "sounding board" of the pulpit. You are correct in saying that English churches were holding meetings for several hundred years before our creature comforts crept in. Charles Hadon Spurgeon preached to more than 5,000 people in London every week without these comforts and aids, and his sermons were far more than homilies on the Scripture of the day. However, times have changed, and with them new styles of delivery have been adopted for the spoken word.   The modern American style of preaching would be extremely bothersome if applied in a highly reverberant room, such as the Cathedrals and churches in the UK. A good expository sermon will take 30 to 40 minutes to deliver, if the preacher doesn't chase too many rabbits. <grins> If the environment is highly reflective, the rate of delivery must be slowed to allow all hearers to sort the "message" out from the rolling reverberations. Preachers in my youth were trained and skilled in delivering sermons in those older buildings with reverberant envrionments. It was much slower than practiced today. That style of oratory was surrounded with a persona that seperated "preaching" from almost every other type of public address, and it often had to be delivered without the aid of amplified sound systems. At the turn of the 20th Century (A.D. 1900) all preachers spoke without sound systems, so in terms of long-standing traditional styles of preaching, we are into a "new" era. AND, ...when you step out of the traditional church environment where the central celebration is focused on the Eucharist, you will find that many of the churches are "hinged" around the centrality of preaching "the Word;" with or without enthusiasm. That is a fact of life. If these churches focus on preaching and teaching from the pulpit, the building housing the meeting needs to have a softer acoustic, ...just so the preaching/teaching can be heard clearly. The musical environment will suffer somewhat. The modern congregation is very uneasy with preachers in the old style of oratory, for it takes too long to deliver the message. We are in a hurry to hear what he has to say and get away to our other activities.   Most of our modern preachers speak at a rate that would be unintelligible in the Cathedrals and churches of the UK. The reberberations would roll up and around the on-going delivery of the spoken words to the point that it would be a continuous stream of noise; nothing more. I am not saying what the modern preachers should or should not say, I am just reporting what I see happening in our evangelical churches, and in the United States there are a lot of growing evangelical churches. Likewise, if organs were shoved into these more modern acoustical environments (ca. 1950-1970) without regard to the softer acoustics, then guess who misjudged the voicing and scaling. Not the church who received the organ, but the builder who followed empirical pipe making concepts without regard to "the other half" of the sound equation; the room. If you wish to read a contemporary report on the installation of a fine organ in a soft room, ...where the spoken word is paramount, then please read Jack Bethards article on the installation of the Schoenstein organ in the new 21,000-seat meeting hall in Salt Lake City. The organ and the room work together; not against each other. This is in the January 2004 edition of The American Organist magazine. Works in transition, such as learning how to make better people environments with adequate acoustical spaces, are often incomplete or less than desirable. Let's be sure we know which situations apply for each church before we expect all churches to behave acoustically as the Cathedrals and churches of the UK. Appreciatively, F. Richard Burt ..  
(back) Subject: Re: A bad room is no excuse (was Re: extreme examples from the 60's and 70's) From: <reedstop@charter.net> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 9:48:39 -0500   Bill, this is true when an organ is built in a room that already has = carpeting and pew cushions. My home church had a BEAUTIFUL acoustic, and = the organ sounded great there, but then someone donated the carpet and a = few years later along came the pew cushions. Of course, the cushions did = little to the sound because the only time you'd notice the difference is = if the church is empty. Let's face it, people absorb sound too. :)   Luckily, the "echo" is the only thing gone and the organ still sounds = good. It didn't lose anything that didn't already get absorbed by the = people. If the church was full, there was no difference, carpeting or = not. :)   jeff   > The carpet along with acoustic tile should not be an impediment > to a builder worth his/her salt.    
(back) Subject: Re: Music Search? From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 10:09:19 -0500   In a message dated 1/6/2004 8:52:02 AM Eastern Standard Time, = dougcampbell@juno.com writes:   > A good friend of mine sent me this today...can anyone help? > > looking for the correct name and publisher of the music. > > > "I'm trying to find the title of an > organ piece with winds by Richard Strauss. Apparently it's the only > organ > thing he ever did - 'believe it takes brasses (perhaps woodwinds??). It =   > might have the word celebration or commemoration in the > title."   Is the title something like "Processional Entry"?, and was done on an LP = by E.Power Biggs for organ and brass? If that's the one he's referring = to, I believe (IIRC) it was an arrangement of an organ piece.   But then of course, I could be wrong.   Richard  
(back) Subject: Re: A bad room is no excuse (was Re: extreme examples from the 60's and 70's) From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 10:20:53 EST   In a message dated 1/6/2004 9:50:12 AM Eastern Standard Time, reedstop@charter.net writes:   > face it, people absorb sound too. :) >   BUT WHEN THEY Stand up and sing the cushions really do add to the sucking = of sound...   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Music Search? From: "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 07:41:51 -0800 (PST)     --- ContraReed@aol.com wrote: > In a message dated 1/6/2004 8:52:02 AM Eastern > Standard Time, dougcampbell@juno.com writes: > > > A good friend of mine sent me this today...can > anyone help? > > > > looking for the correct name and publisher of the > music. > > > > > > "I'm trying to find the title of an > > organ piece with winds by Richard Strauss. > Apparently it's the only > > organ > > thing he ever did - 'believe it takes brasses > (perhaps woodwinds??). It > > might have the word celebration or commemoration > in the > > title." > > Is the title something like "Processional Entry"?, > and was done on an LP by E.Power Biggs for organ and > brass? If that's the one he's referring to, I > believe (IIRC) it was an arrangement of an organ > piece. > > But then of course, I could be wrong. > > Richard > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > No, I do not believe you are wrong. It was played at the National Christian Church, Washington, D. C. as Mrs. Lyndon Johnson entered at the beginning of her husband's funeral... the whole congregation stood in respect.   My music is not at hand from where I am inputting this... but I believe it is published by C. F. Peters, New York, N. Y. See if they have a web site... and I believe you will get a trumpet part with it when you order it. Yes, the piece is a very thrilling one...     Best wishes to all,     Morton Belcher fellow list member...   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Hotjobs: Enter the "Signing Bonus" Sweepstakes http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/signingbonus  
(back) Subject: Re: Music Search? From: "June Edison" <junemax@insightbb.com> Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 11:00:34 -0500   The Strauss piece is called Solemn Entry (of the knights of the order of = St. John). arranged for brass quintet and organ by Gary Olson, Canzona Publications, Ltd., Denver, CO, 1978 June Edison ---------- >From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> >To: Pipechat@pipechat.org,PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu >Subject: Music Search? >Date: Tue, Jan 6, 2004, 8:52 AM >   >A good friend of mine sent me this today...can anyone help? > >looking for the correct name and publisher of the music. > > >"I'm trying to find the title of an >organ piece with winds by Richard Strauss. Apparently it's the only >organ >thing he ever did - 'believe it takes brasses (perhaps woodwinds??). It >might have the word celebration or commemoration in the title." > > > >Douglas A. Campbell >Skaneateles, NY >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: 2m5r Geneva Pipe Organ for sale.(cross posted) From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 10:22:41 -0600   I received this email and have since found out some additional = information. I am cross-posting this to the organ lists with the hope that someone out there might want this orphaned instrument.   At 07:05 PM 12/11/03,"Arhlene Skrypek" <arhlene@albrechtenterprises.net> = wrote:   >We currently have a pipe organ manufactured by the Geneva Organ Company >and are interested in selling the complete operating unit. We would >appreciate any help you could provide in preserving this fine piece of >history. Thank you for your time. > >Arhlene   Received the following response today: Jon,   We still have some time, but not much (we anticipate a demolition start date within two weeks). Would you mind posting a notice so we can see if anyone is interested? My boss would be very happy if it wasn't destroyed with the building. I appreciate any help you can afford me. Thank you very much for responding to my email.   Arhlene   The organ was listed on the church organ trader with the following = information:   Geneva 2 manual 5 rank pipe organ is available for sale. The organ is in Ohlier's funeral home in Des Plaines, IL. Time is of the essence, there is =   a 2 week window of opportunity to remove the organ then the building gets knocked down. Price is about $2500.00 for an organ that is worth about $3000.00 in pristine shape I would put the condition of the organ at about =   a 6 (on a scale of 10) on the console and 8 on the pipe chamber. The pipe chamber is about 12'wide x 12'tall x 6'deep. The organ was designed for a room that is about 25' W x 50' L x 20' H. The organ plays well and all in working condition. It would take about 3 days to properly disassemble the organ for a move. Experienced help is available for the disassembly. A gentlemen from CATOE (Chicago Area Theatre Organ Enthusiasts) has said he would help to properly disassemble the organ for transport.   If you know anybody who would be interested in the organ please pass this on to them. It would be a good organ for a church or house. You can e-mail me for pictures of the organ. Thanks   John Kleinschmidt Des Plaines, IL savetheater@aol.com www.desplainesperformingartscenter.org   It would be a shame to see this little organ destroyed. John is not directly connected with the owner, but has done what he can to help save this organ, along with John Shanahan who took the pictures. You can get pictures from John at his address above or from me at: info@catoe.org   Jon C. Habermaas    
(back) Subject: Parrying with nature (Jerusalem) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 08:35:36 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   As to "which" scholarly source, I cannot say. I am extremely lazy, and seldom read poetry....I just write it when I feel inspired. However, the American Uni lecturer (English Literature) with whom I shared my life some years ago told me of an alternative understanding.   Wm.Blake was active during the great building period which marks the full development of the Industrial Revolution, which also happens to co-incide with a "pastoral movement" in poetry (Shelley etc)....."pan theism" had gained quite a hold over the 18th century minds of England, and probably saved Christianity from oblivion.   It is easy to simplify "Jerusalem" as merely a reaction against the Industrial Revolution and its "dark, satanic mills".   If we dig a little deeper, we come across something else; which was Blake's mistrust of a society dominated by learning and REASON.....he blamed Newton for creating a society which was demanding a new sense of conformity to this type of thinking; thus, as he saw it, enslaving a whole nation.   Blake wrote: "I must create a system or be enslaved by another man's. I will not REASON and compare: my business is to create."   Hence, the allusion to "dark, satanic mills" has been also interpreted as referring to places of learning, which Blake regarded as a-moral and contrary to Christian values.   Better try and keep this on topic.....Parry was an organist!!!!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- ProOrgo53@aol.com wrote: > In a message dated 1/5/2004 7:16:07 PM Central > Standard Time, > cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes: > > "Jerusalem" is the most ridiculous ditty, and for > those who may wish to share the joke, his reference > to > "dark, satanic mills" was an oblique reference to > schools, colleges and universities! > What scholarly source/treatise sets forth this bit > of "truth?" >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Hotjobs: Enter the "Signing Bonus" Sweepstakes http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/signingbonus  
(back) Subject: Bach from the dead? Let's get a Handel on this..... From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 08:47:08 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   If Bach were alive to-day........   Bach was a child of his time, and I see no point in speculating what he would do were he alive today.   Indeed, working our time machine, what would the audiences and congregations of the 18th century have made of Virgil Fox?   We don't have a modern equivalent to Bach I suppose, but it isn't that long since we had Reger and Dupre; two composers who certainly put the organ through its paces. I cannot imagine that Bach EVER had a technique to match that of Dupre!!   18th century German music was all about "linear writing".....I think Bach would be aghast at Impressionism and contemporary organ music were he to come "Bach from the dead."       --- RMB10@aol.com wrote: > Del Case wrote: > >I have no doubt that if Bach were alive today he > would make maximum use > >of the best > >of modern organ building. (Whether that is > Schoenstein, or Rosales, or > >Fisk, or, or, > >or, or, is subject to debate.) > > >HOWEVER, if Bach were alive today he would not be > composing Baroque >trio > sonatas, > >Baroque preludes and fugues, Baroque chorale > preludes, etc. He would be > >composing > >in his version of A style of our day. Notice, A > style, not THE style of > >today, since > >there are so many streams. > > I don't disagree with this at all, however with all > the modern advances in > organbuilding, Bach would be pushing the limits of > compositional techniques > because of what the organ can do today. I think it > would probably be quite > amazing (and probably frightening) what he could do > if he were alive today. > I would venture to guess that Bach would probably > make Virgil Fox look rather > tame--and I am rather positive (pardon the pun) that > Bach would bring in the > same kind of crowds that Virgil did. The organ > would be a popular instrument > because it wouldn't be such an esoteric instrument > like it has been made to be > by many or the people playing it today. > > >While I have certainly heard some extreme examples > from the 60's and > >70's, I have > >never heard of an instrument such as you describe > above. > In response to my rather exaggerated example of > extreme neo-baroque organ > building styles, I have played a couple of organs > that were built in the style I > described. I've had to play services on them and > I've had to play recitals on > them. Needless to say, it was not enjoyable. Try > playing anything of > interest on a one manual neo-baroque organ that > didn't have any divided stops, so > solo possibilities were out of the question, unless > it was the 4' flute > accompanying itself or the 4' principal doing the > same. The 8' gedeckt was too > chiffy and quinty in the bass to accompany itself. > The 1/4 length reed sounded > like a tuned duck call. I should also note that > there are no mutations on this > organ, either. The Mixture was so high pitched that > it was not really usable, > since the whole chorus was built upon an 8' Nason > Gedeckt. The consultant who > designed that organ for the church should have been > shot. This is in a fairly > large, well to do Catholic church in California. > Sure the church has a pipe > organ, but it's all but unuseable. While in > college, I also played another > organ along the same lines. Everything chiffed so > much, it sounded like I had > a Xylophone playing along with the organ. The > mixtures were so high pitched > that they didn't blend. I was told "but that is how > baroque organs are." My > response was "that is how broken organs are." I > don't claim that any style of > building is better than another. I have my > preferences, obviously, but having > heard and played some wonderful old tracker organs, > those organs don't > resemble the travesties that were inflicted on us > during the "organ reform" era one > bit. > > Monty Bennett >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Hotjobs: Enter the "Signing Bonus" Sweepstakes http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/signingbonus