PipeChat Digest #4217 - Tuesday, January 13, 2004
 
Re: Congregational Singing at Funerals
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Latin translation
  by "Henry Glass" <henry@melbay.com>
Re: Mechanical Action with second electric console
  by "Mark Gustus" <MGustus@msn.com>
Singing at Funerals
  by "John Jarvis" <JLJarvis@comcast.net>
Re: Westminster Hymnal (x post)
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Mechanical Action with second electric console
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Latin translation
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: "14th Century Period English Organ"
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Congregational Singing at Funerals
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
punctuation - was RE: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net>
Re: Congregational Singing at Funerals
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: punctuation - was RE: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re Congregational Singing at Funerals
  by "James E. Storms" <s1328462@sensewave.com>
Re: Congregational Singing at Funerals
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: CURRENT EMAIL ADDRESS FOR JOE MC CABE
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
What is your favorite organ-related website?
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Re: punctuation - was RE: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: Prelude, Fugue, and Variation
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Funeral and singing
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
question about salvage value
  by "cjs" <musicjs2001@yahoo.com>
Re: Funeral and singing
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: question about salvage value
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Congregational Singing at Funerals From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 10:14:45 -0000   There's always singing in the church services I have played. Never been asked just to 'perform' on my own. And the same goes for services at crematoria (Latin scholars - is that correct ?) since in England funeral directors just don't 'do' services at their places of business. Once or twice I've played secular songs at the funerals of professed Humanists - and most moving I have always found = those events.   Sometimes I have been asked about the 'suitability' of requests for voluntaries - one such last week was for the 'Dance of the Sugar-plum = Fairy' by ol' Pietre Illich; which I was happy to play (after the Rector had prefaced it as "the deceased's favourite" rather than "the organist's = mental aboration").   Prior to that, the week before - "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" as the coffin arrived - for a young sportsman (and our US cousins will have to make = their own enquiries as to the relevance of that tune). - v.1 solo reed against closed stopped diap.- v.2 full reeds + 16' in fully closed swell - 'and there wasn't a dry eye in the house'.   Always the same - two countries divided by the same language ... "Ain't = the strokes of those different folks _ "STRANGE!"   Harry [MusicMan] Grove   -----Original Message----- From: First Christian Church of Casey, IL <kzrev@rr1.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 13 January 2004 01:34 Subject: Congregational Singing at Funerals     >Having grown in the midwest, and attended--and officiated--at many = funerals >in several states, I can tell you that congregational singing is the >exception, not the rule. I can count on the fingers of one hand the >funerals where I've seen congregational singing--in over 25 years of >ministry. We're talking basically middle of the road protestant groups = of >whatever ilk here. > >And, alas, the church funeral is very much a rarity nowadays, even for >people of faith. For people who didn't profess much faith, I don't see = any >reason to put the service in a church. >But "your experience may vary." >Dennis Steckley >& A Six-Pack of Cats      
(back) Subject: Latin translation From: "Henry Glass" <henry@melbay.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 08:12:03 -0600   I have an Easter anthem with the words "in cymbalis in cymbalis bene sonantibus" as the refrain. Anyone know the translation in English? Thank you!    
(back) Subject: Re: Mechanical Action with second electric console From: "Mark Gustus" <MGustus@msn.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 08:09:23 -0600   Lawrence Phelps & Associates, 1978 Christ Chapel, Oral Roberts University, Tulsa, OK   http://www.lawrencephelps.com/Documents/Instruments/tulsa.shtml   A splended tracker instrument, wed via electric pull-downs to a Wurlitzer theater organ. Both playable from the Wurly console. On the website I = note that the Wurlitzer has since been removed. Who says God has no taste?   -Mark  
(back) Subject: Singing at Funerals From: "John Jarvis" <JLJarvis@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 06:23:30 -0800   I think I only ever played for 2=20   weddings during that time.   Beau, that tickled my funny bone, although, I guess, it's kind of a sad =     statement about marriage, isn't it?   =20   Dale, I had to laugh at your laugh. It's not a sad statement about = marriage as it is a sad statement about the congregation - it must be dying off. = A well age blended congregation will have a good number of funerals and weddings in a given year.   =20   Reminds me of the old joke about the young lady who was approaching her = 30's and not yet married. At every family wedding, her old "aunties" would = poke her in the ribs with a wink and say "You're next" dear. This upset the young lady to no end. At the next family funeral for one of the old "aunties", she took the time to poke several of the other "aunties" in = the ribs and say with a wink, "You're next".   =20   =20   =20      
(back) Subject: Re: Westminster Hymnal (x post) From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 09:53:47 EST   Hello Innkawgneeto@cs.com,   In reference to your comment:   =E8 Today on the radio program "With Heart and Voice", =E8 Richard Gladwell mentioned this hymnal (it seems to =E8 be the authoritative RC hymnal of Britain). He played a =E8 couple stalwart hymntunes I immediately fell in love =E8 with. Is this hymnal available in the US?   Neil, just go to www.google.com and search on "Westminster Hymnal." There=20 are a number of sources you can choose from.   I think it's possible to get ANYTHING in the U.S. <g>   Victoria    
(back) Subject: Re: Mechanical Action with second electric console From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 10:08:02 EST   Be reminded that the speech characteristics will be different with the electric pulldowns than with the direct mechanical action.   SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: Latin translation From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 07:24:27 -0800   (Praise him) with the well-tuned cymbals.   Cheers,   Bud   Henry Glass wrote:   > I have an Easter anthem with the words "in cymbalis in cymbalis bene > sonantibus" as the refrain. Anyone know the translation in English? = Thank > you! > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: "14th Century Period English Organ" From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 10:34:56 EST   Hello DERREINETOR@aol.com,   In reference to your comment:   =E8 This website is, perhaps, the most appalling thing I've =E8 seen in some time. However, it is well worth visiting if =E8 only for the pictures of perhaps the most appalling =E8 gothic architectural pastiche a la Hollywood I have ever =E8 seen. Hopefully, the Skinner is more tasteful than =E8 building that surrounds it. I mean, "A combination of =E8 benefits you won't find anywhere else"? Is this a church =E8 or a pension plan?   If it IS a pension plan, at least they're supporting the pipe organ=20 industry!!   One must suppose that these "chapels" look far better during a wedding, when= =20 all eyes are on the bride. <g>   Victoria    
(back) Subject: Re: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 10:37:46 EST   Hello azeilenga@theatreorgans.com,   In reference to your comment:   =E8 Thank you, Mr. Freed. I am sure we will all remember =E8 to use proper punctuation from now on. Alicia =E8 -looking to see if there is any room under the desk   Punctuation is SO very important. To quote Benny Hill, "What's that in the= =20 road? A head?" OR, "What's this thing called, love?" <g>   Victoria    
(back) Subject: Re: Congregational Singing at Funerals From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 10:41:25 EST   Hello kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu,   In reference to your comment:   =E8 I have received many warm thank-you notes in behalf =E8 of the Requiem Choir from bereaved family persons =E8 after a funeral. In one case, there were more people in =E8 the choir than the congregation, and it may have been =E8 one of the most valuable Requiem Choir ministries =E8 ever.   I belonged to a community choir for many years. When one of our members=20 passed, all that could attend did so. We sung selections (I don't remember=20= which)=20 from Mozart's "Requiem," which given that we had 35+ voices present, was=20 truly lovely and a fitting way to say goodbye to one of our own.   Victoria    
(back) Subject: punctuation - was RE: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 10:21:42 -0600   or the surprise best selling book in the UK: "Eats, Shoots and Leaves", = the punch line of a joke about a panda in a bar.     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Myosotis51@aol.com Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2004 9:38 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan     Hello azeilenga@theatreorgans.com,   In reference to your comment:   =E8 Thank you, Mr. Freed. I am sure we will all remember =E8 to use proper punctuation from now on. Alicia =E8 -looking to see if there is any room under the desk   Punctuation is SO very important. To quote Benny Hill, "What's that in = the road? A head?" OR, "What's this thing called, love?" <g>   Victoria      
(back) Subject: Re: Congregational Singing at Funerals From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 11:37:30 -0500   On 1/12/04 8:32 PM, "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> wrote:   > Having grown in the midwest, and attended--and officiated at--many funera= ls in > several states, I can tell you that congregational singing is the excepti= on, > not the rule. I can count on the fingers of one hand the funerals where = I've > seen congregational singing--in over 25 years of ministry. We're talking > basically middle of the road protestant groups of whatever ilk here.   I have no doubt your report is accurate, Dennis. I attribute that to a lac= k of pastoral and musical leadership. Is that too harsh an opinion? (Especially in view of how very simple it is to introduce it?--and it being broadly customary that when Christians get together for worship, they SING!= ) =20 > And, alas, the church funeral is very much a rarity nowadays, even for pe= ople > of faith. For people who didn't profess much faith, I don't see any reas= on to > put the service in a church.   I certainly agree with the second sentence of that paragraph, without reservation. But the first? In each parish I served (from rural North Dakota to The Bronx) I simply went, when the first funeral was about to happen, with the family to the mortuary, and there made it known that that'= s where the funeral would be: in the church, with the familiar songbooks, organ, windows, vestments, choir--the "setting" of worship. Never surprise= d the mortician, because I'd told HIM that the first week I'd been in the community. Families never objected--indeed, later expressed great appreciation. "Funeral in a place of LIFE, not a place of death." And fro= m then on, it was just way it's done. (Never once had a funeral in a mortuar= y establishment.)   Forty years ago, YOUR congregations had communion every Sunday; ours did not. It may take a year or two to "sell" that to a congregation. Singing hymns at funeral may take 2 to 20 minutes to "sell." Funeral in the churc= h takes about 30 seconds, if that; it's just so obvious. Sell it once, and they=B9ll never look back.   Alan (42 years there, and counting)        
(back) Subject: RE: punctuation - was RE: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 10:49:27 -0600   It'll be available in the US in April. Reserve, your copy; now.   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Michael David Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2004 10:22 AM To: PipeChat Subject: punctuation - was RE: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan   or the surprise best selling book in the UK: "Eats, Shoots and Leaves", = the punch line of a joke about a panda in a bar.     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Myosotis51@aol.com Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2004 9:38 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan     Hello azeilenga@theatreorgans.com,   In reference to your comment:   =E8 Thank you, Mr. Freed. I am sure we will all remember =E8 to use proper punctuation from now on. Alicia =E8 -looking to see if there is any room under the desk   Punctuation is SO very important. To quote Benny Hill, "What's that in = the road? A head?" OR, "What's this thing called, love?" <g>   Victoria     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re Congregational Singing at Funerals From: "James E. Storms" <s1328462@sensewave.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 18:00:55 +0100   In both Iceland and Norway, some of the best church singing occurs at = funerals.   In the Icelandic Churches that I played, a choir (either the "Sunday = Choir" or a "Funeral Choir") ALWAYS led the singing. The hymns HAD to = be in parts as well.   Choirs in Norwegian Churches are NOT the norm. However, there are at = least three hymns for the congregation. =20   I hasten to add that both countries have their favourites. Often the = Priest can be drowned out by the usually "passive" congregation.   Storms  
(back) Subject: Re: Congregational Singing at Funerals From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 12:02:24 -0500   My goodness, Dale! I agree thoroughly with EVERYTHING you=B9ve said, from th= e =B3basic facts=B2 (which match my own observations from Seattle to New York) to your eloquently stated =B3opinions=B2 on the subject. Thank you!   Alan   On 1/12/04 9:10 PM, "ProOrgo53@aol.com" <ProOrgo53@aol.com> wrote:   > Speaking from my "vantage point": in the Greater Kansas City area, "fune= rals" > tend to be held for non-churched, homeless, and aged persons who had no > children, and those who left no specific directives. > =20 > Memorial services, however, are plentiful in this area of the country and > across many denominational lines. They are extremely meaningful, both to = the > members of the family, as well as to extended families of the deceased. > =20 > Memorial services occur both at funeral homes AND at churches. > =20 > In addition to selected music familiar to and requested by immediate fami= ly > members of the deceased, congregational hymns are often sung. > =20 > A service of committal (returning the deceased to his/her Creator) is, > afterall, a service of worship, not a spectator event. Congregational si= nging > is the principal, inclusive, opportunity for those who attend to contribu= te to > the experience. > =20 > I well remember something said to my wife and me by Dr. Frederick Jackisc= h, > whom I served as graduate teaching assistant in Organ Performance at > Wittenberg University (Springfield, Ohio) from 1971 to 1973 while earning= our > M.SacredMusic degrees: "It is the responsibility of the Church to accompa= ny > the Christian soul throughout its life --- from birth to the grave. The o= nly > thing needed from a funeral home (for a Christian) is embalming fluid." = It > wasn't my understanding then (or now) that he meant any disrespect to tho= se in > the business of preparing and burying the dead. If anything, his "jab" se= emed > to be directed to clergy, church administrators and church governing boar= ds > who fail to step forward and bring ministry to their congregants at the > precise time they need ministry the most. > =20 > Dale G. Rider > Independence, Missouri, USA >=20 >=20      
(back) Subject: Re: CURRENT EMAIL ADDRESS FOR JOE MC CABE From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 12:17:01 -0500   On 1/12/04 10:39 PM, "ScottFop@aol.com" <ScottFop@aol.com> wrote:   > Hello all > > Does anyone have a current email address for Joe McCabe? I know that he = has > left the Buffalo area but I do not know if he kept his same email = address. > Any assistance will be greatly appreciated. Thanks! > > -Scott > > Scott F. Foppiano > Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat. >   jmmccabe@acsu.buffalo.edu        
(back) Subject: What is your favorite organ-related website? From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 12:35:07 -0500   Hi, Y'all!   I edit the monthly newsletter for the Nashville Chapter of the A.G.O., and = each month I highlight a website which may be of use to our membership. Of = course, the first one I mentioned was the Guild website (a very wonderful = resource), and this month I'm highlight the OHS.   My need is for you to tell me (and the Nashville membership) what are the = sites you find of use as a professional or amateur organist. They do not = have to be organ related (one of our members suggested a site for = procuring out-of-print books).   Thanks for your help. A private response will be fine, and then I'll do a = compilation to post to the List(s).   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea  
(back) Subject: Re: punctuation - was RE: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 12:48:23 -0500   In a message dated 1/13/2004 11:21:42 AM Eastern Standard Time, = michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net writes:   > or the surprise best selling book in the UK: "Eats, Shoots > and Leaves", the > punch line of a joke about a panda in a bar.   I heard that joke about a koala in a house of ill repute.....  
(back) Subject: Re: Prelude, Fugue, and Variation From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 16:50:12 EST   >You should >be in a respectful, but collegial relationship with your teacher, and he >should never just tell you to do something, but should merely suggest = things >in a non obtrusive way. That allows you to use your brain and think >critically-which should be the goal of a university anyway... >gfc   Finally someone who has learned something in school! Too many students = come out of college blindly spouting off what their teacher told them as = gospel. When playing music written for Cavaille-Coll organs for rooms with 5, 6, = or even 8 seconds of reverberation in American rooms with negative reverb on non-descript 6 rank organs, there is just no way that you can do exactly = what the composer has indicated. The performer must use their ears and rely on musicianship to come up with the best approximation of whatthe composer = intended and what the organ should sound like. I get so fed up with people who say = that there is only one way to register a piece. "You must always use the (insert = stop here) when playing (insert composer here)" Yes, there is only one way to register a piece, in my opinion--the musical way. It may not be the way = that the composer intended, it may not be the historically correct way, but when = you don't have a historically correct instrument or the room is acoustically abyssmal, the performer must rely on their ears to make a musically = informed decision as to how to register to get a pleasing and musical effect that will do justice to the programmed work. I've performed recitals on all sorts of instruments--pipe, digital, analog electronic, Hammond. I try to program = my recitals to get the best effects I can out of the instrument I have to work with, but = when you have a 4 rank unit organ to play, the limitations are rather severe. One must make due. Sure, the performance isn't historically accurate, but =   that is when musicianship becomes the key. Gregory points out that the = goal of the university is to teach students to think critically. At times like = this, that skill comes into play. I've heard too many organists say things like = "I can't do anything with an organ like that." Well, they don't need to be playing it. Yeah, I've played more interesting organs, I've played better = ones, but this church had this little pipe organ. I played it, I made music on = it, and the church was overjoyed about it. As one lady told me afterward, = "you made our organ talk!" They paid my fee, so I was obliged to do my part to make =   music for them. It is possible to "make the organ talk" if one gets = creative and doesn't get locked in to only doing things the way that their teacher = told them they had to do it. As my professor told me in a lesson once, "learn = the rules, then break them."   Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral and singing From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 17:06:48 EST   Just to clarify, there is a lot of confusion going on here about funerals, =   memorial services, etc. I think that the discussion is interesting, since = it covers both of my careers, but I want to point out a few things because terminology is obscuring what points people are trying to make.   Funeral: a service where a body is present in a casket   Memorial Service: a service where the body is not present, or the = cremated remains are present in an urn. (also may be called "Celebration of Life" service--one of our newfangled funeral jargon words like "family service = counselor")   Anyway, funerals or memorials can be held for anyone who has died. They = can be held anywhere the family wishes--funeral home, church, synagogue, = cemetery, in the family's home, beside the deceased's favorite fishing spot, etc. = What happens during the service is up to the family and the clergy and is only limited by church rubrics (in a liturgical setting) or the family's = creativity in a non-liturgical setting. We funeral directors can guide people toward consulting with their clergy, but oftentimes, minds are made up as to what = they want in a service when they come to talk to us. Being that I also work = for a church, I often tell families that if they are having a church service, = that they better rethink some of the song selections that they have mentioned, or = that they should run the ideas by the minister for approval. Because most of = the people in our town know that I play the piano and organ, they will take my =   suggestions regarding church services and music. I tell them that if they = want some off the wall kind of musical selection that the visitation time at = the funeral home would be a good time to play the song because it's not a = religious atmosphere. That usually goes over well and they get to hear their song = and it doesn't tacky up a religious event.   As to congregational singing and church held funeral services, 98% of our services are done in churches and most of them have congregational = singing. The other few percent are generally graveside services with maybe two services held in our funeral home each year. At least we have a pipe = organ when we do those services. Maybe it's a Southern thing, but in this area, we = still are pretty traditional and most services are done in churches because most = people are involved in a local church.   Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: question about salvage value From: "cjs" <musicjs2001@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 15:00:17 -0800 (PST)   Is there any salvage value in "old" magnets from organ chests or pipe racks? My church is ready to take all the old parts to the dump tomorrow. I just got a look at them yesterday for the first time. The pipes are in a crawl space under the church in dirt. They have been there several years. I understand this was a used theater organ at one time. Does anyone know where I can find out about the pipes or should they just be given away/sold as souvenirs? Clarice Snyder    
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral and singing From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 19:09:38 -0500   Monty: =20   You posted on a related subject a few days ago. I intended to respond then with huge approbation, but then couldn=B9t find your address in my voluminous address book (even to retrieve your post, though now I have both). Now, again, you=B9ve written in words that I agree with enthusiastically, from beginning to end. I=B9ve =B3done=B2 your website, and am very impressed. Everything you=B9re written (well, at least on THIS subject!) is absolutely right, both in =B3detail=B2 and in =B3tone.=B2 I=B9d love to be a clergyperson in YOUR town! =20   No, I don=B9t think that =B3singing in church=B2 or =B3funerals in church=B2 is a =B3Southern=B2 thing; it was the same in Norwegian North Dakota in the 1960s--and , I hope, still IS. And a lot of posts from all over Middle America in the past 24 hours seem to suggest the same, and more up-to-date than what I=B9ve posted   Thank you hugely. =20   Alan (also =B3pretty traditional,=B2 and planning to stay that way)              
(back) Subject: Re: question about salvage value From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 18:16:47 -0600   Hi, Clarice --   The quick answer is "yes", except when it is "no"... ;-) Honestly, there are far too many variables to be able to answer with any accuracy, without =   more information.   GENERALLY SPEAKING, wooden organ parts don't do well when piled in the = dirt under a building for years. Even if they escape attack by termites etc., the moisture is usually deadly to the hide glue holding everything = together and can also damage or destory electrical components and hardware. Metal organ pipes which have been piled in heaps usually don't fare much better, =   though the fatal damage is probably more often from physical damage (getting squashed/broken).   THAT BEING SAID, the "value" of such things can still depend on many other =   factors, not the least of which is how much time and effort *you* wish to expend in order to find people who might be interested. If the church is ready to haul everything away tomorrow, it could be a lost cause already. Too bad.   And, for the record, if there are metal organ pipes involved in this salvage operation, it would probably be better to seperate them from the wooden components and dispose of them as scrap tin/lead/zinc. A scrap metal dealer/recycler might pay a small amount, and it would keep the lead =   out of the landfill.   Hope this is of some help --   Tim Bovard (who has seen more organ parts destroyed by negligence than he cares to have seen)     At 03:00 PM 1/13/2004 -0800, Clarice wrote: >Is there any salvage value in "old" magnets from organ >chests or pipe racks? My church is ready to take all >the old parts to the dump tomorrow. <snip>