PipeChat Digest #4219 - Wednesday, January 14, 2004
 
Re: What is your favorite organ-related website?
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Funerals--location and singing
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Funerals--location and singing
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Organ Departments
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Wittenberg University chapel organ
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
RE: Funerals--location and singing
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Funerals--location and singing
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Funerals--location and singing
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
In search of a one-time New York organist
  by "Tom Jones" <tomj@netpath.net>
RE: Funerals--location and singing
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: Funerals--location and singing
  by "Erik Johnson" <the_maitre@hotmail.com>
Re: Westminster Hymnal (x post)
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
RE: Westminster Hymnal (x post)
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
Small new organ in the works...
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
RE: Small new organ in the works...
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Overture Hall, Madison WI.
  by "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: What is your favorite organ-related website? From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 09:04:28 -0600   This is a hard question to answer, there are so many good sites out there. =   Being a theatre organ fan my interest is slanted in that direction. The Theatre Organ Home Page, www.theatreorgans.com is certainly an treasure trove of theatre organ information which includes a classified section for =   organs and organ parts which I visited regularly, for sites with a local interest I have to say that the Puget Sound Theatre Organ Society page is outstanding, www.pstos.org . It lists information on many of the original Pacific Northwest theatre organ installation, has technical information = for the hobbyist, a classified section, and many local organist's bios, The Chicago Area CATOE site is another, but I have a vested interest in that one being a long time member of CATOE www.catoe.org . We hope to see it grow more this year with the addition of a listing of original theatre installations in the Chicago area and more organs and organist = biographies. The on-line calendar is available to keep abreast of theatre organ = programs and activities of CATOE and other organ organizations in the area....when the information is available you will find listings of both theatre and classical organ programs. The ATOS and OHS sites are also worth visiting. = I am really hard pressed to name a favorite and have to be content to list a =   few of my favorites.   Jon    
(back) Subject: Re: Funerals--location and singing From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 11:21:53 -0500   On 1/13/04 9:05 PM, "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> wrote:   > Sorry, Alan, I have no plan to "put my foot down," and insist on = funerals at > the church. You Lutheran clergy have more clout (and a different = tradition) > about things like that anyway.   You're right on that, of course. But there are two parts to that: (1) Pastor instructs; (2) People listen. In my North Dakota parish, everybody was Lutheran since forever, so they just followed along no matter what I = did (which is not ENTIRELY satisfactory). In my Baltimore parish they came = from ALL backgrounds, so it took patience and "gentle persuasion." (Same in = the Bronx.) > > I gently encourage at appropriate times the practice of church funerals = (and I > like congregational hymns when we do), but I would never intrude on a = family's > grief and push my position; if asked at that time, I would encourage, = not > require.   I'm with ya. It's been YEARS, but I don't think I EVER had to "require" anything. In North Dakota, burial was in the churchyard, 20 miles from = the funeral parlor, so that tilted things in my favor. And I think they'd always done it that was anyway, so no sweat. Bronx and Baltimore had much less "tradition," but I think they were so glad to have me at the funeral home with them for "planning"--which they'd never heard of!--that they'd have done anything I dared HINT at!   > It is not customary in places I've worked for clergy to go with family = to meet > with the funeral director.   I don't think it was customary in my parishes either. But, boy, was it = ever appreciated! As you've indicated, people are feeling pretty vulnerable at such a time, and really are grateful for a knowledgeable professional = voice in the room--on their "side," if that's necessary.   > The local funeral director knows how I feel--and he prefers church = funerals, > too (though they are more work for him--and in my experience, church = funerals > DO cost more, and rightfully so). > > And, frankly, I've gained more than one church family because a = hardliner > clergyman put his/her foot down, and instead of being appreciated was = seen > as an insensitive clod.   I can definitely believe THAT. I have gained whole families that way TOO. We used to joke that our church was half full of people who USED to be at St. Rita's. > > My last couple of ministries have been in communities with a strong > tradition of open casket funerals which I absolutely loathe and detest, = but > that's the family's decision, not mine. Just to throw another monkey = wrench > in for discussion! > Oh, THAT subject. Haven't seen THAT in decades. Well, on THAT I WOULD = put my foot down. It's simply not allowed. In the country churches in North Dakota, all non-Roman funerals were at 2 p.m. (almost a state law!). (Talking early 60s here.) So the mortician would drive 20 miles out to = the church at about 9:30 a.m., park the box in the narthex, open. Any who wanted could come by (there were NO viewings/visitations other than that). The "family" would gather at 11 or so for communion (especially important when folks come a good distance). Then they'd lunch, lightly, at home. Then close the box at 1 or 2, and process to the altar with it (feet = first, and left in that position) at 2 for the service.   Burial in the church yard, followed by major chow in the basement.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Funerals--location and singing From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 09:00:39 -0800       "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" wrote: > > > > My last couple of ministries have been in communities with a strong > > tradition of open casket funerals which I absolutely loathe and > detest, but > > that's the family's decision, not mine. Just to throw another monkey =   > wrench > > in for discussion!   Alan replied: > > > Oh, THAT subject. Haven't seen THAT in decades. Well, on THAT I WOULD > put my foot down. It's simply not allowed. In the country churches in > North Dakota, all non-Roman funerals were at 2 p.m. (almost a state > law!). (Talking early 60s here.) So the mortician would drive 20 miles =   > out to the church at about 9:30 a.m., park the box in the narthex, open. =   > Any who wanted could come by (there were NO viewings/visitations other > than that). The "family" would gather at 11 or so for communion > (especially important when folks come a good distance). Then they'd > lunch, lightly, at home. Then close the box at 1 or 2, and process to > the altar with it (feet first, and left in that position) at 2 for the > service.     In our tradition (shared with the Romans), the casket is allowed to be open for the WAKE (and usually IS) ... I remember the old Roman bishop of Cleveland being laid out in his cathedral, open casket, mitre and all, holding a chalice (!).   BUT, for the MASS, the casket was CLOSED and covered with the purple pall ... all are equal in death before Almighty God. Well, almost ... a bishop is given FIVE absolutions, on the theory he probably has more to be forgiven (chuckle).   My favorite memory of that: the night before the actual funeral, all the Uniate Rite churches came in and celebrated Divine Liturgy all night long. We had intended to go to the Byzantine liturgy, as Archbishop Elko was to celebrate ... we had trouble finding a place to park and ended up at the Ruthenian liturgy instead. The Ruthenians had two TINY parishes in Cleveland ...Divine Liturgy started, and the music was the RACHMANINOFF (!). I looked back to the cathedral choir-loft, and there HAD to have been at LEAST a hundred singers. What a SOUND! Must have been the entire CONGREGATIONS from those two little churches. But they could SING ... oh, MY, could they sing ... eight parts, unaccompanied, in perfect pitch, for more than two hours. And the Rachmaninoff isn't the kind of thing where you pull in some ringers and do it in a couple of rehearsals, particularly not in Church Slavonic.   A footnote: lay people are laid out with their feet toward the altar; clergy are laid out with their feet toward the congregation ... a pastor faces his people, even in death ... this also reverses the positions of the thurifer, crucifer, torches, and sacred ministers for the Absolutions ... the sacred ministers stand at the west end of the coffin, facing the altar; the thurifer, etc. stand at the east end of the coffin, facing the congregation. However, both clergy and laity are BURIED with their feet to the east, awaiting the Sun of Justice.   Bud      
(back) Subject: RE: Organ Departments From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 11:40:26 -0600   Dale and Pete are right. Here at Oklahoma City University, we have the venerable and thoroughly wonderful Antone Godding as professor of organ. The facilities are first-rate, the cost of living low, the climate temperate. No crowds, no waiting.   =20   Peter   =20   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of ProOrgo53@aol.com Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2004 10:18 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Organ Departments   =20   What a valuable and true message our friend Pete Isherwood has shared with us.   =20   When I found Wittenberg University (Springfield, Ohio) in 1970 in a Church Music Journal "ad" and began investigate about graduate study with the well known Dutch-German (composer), our dear Professor Jan Bender, little did I know that I would soon discover a wonderful and gifted church musician / organ professor (head of the Graduate Division of Church Music) in Dr. Frederick Jackisch (retired); or Aurora Smith, my warm, loving, and gifted vocal coach, wife of Dr. Orcenith Smith, head of theVoice Dept, who had had the joy of being the first female student assistant to Dr. Clarence Dickinson at Union Theological Seminary in her own "school" days; or the Fulbright scholar, church and concert organist/harpsichordist who is now Chair of the School of Music, my mentor and friend Trudy Faber. Little do we know.   =20   Dale G. Rider   Independence, MO, USA      
(back) Subject: Wittenberg University chapel organ From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 13:47:59 -0500   I've been to Springfield Oh several times and seen the chapel from the outside always wondering what they had inside for an organ. Please tell. thanks, A. Mead Port Hope, ON Canada   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of ProOrgo53@aol.com Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2004 11:18 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Organ Departments   What a valuable and true message our friend Pete Isherwood has shared with us.   When I found Wittenberg University (Springfield, Ohio) in 1970 in a Church Music Journal "ad" and began investigate about graduate study with the = well known Dutch-German (composer), our dear Professor Jan Bender, little did I know that I would soon discover a wonderful and gifted church musician / organ professor (head of the Graduate Division of Church Music) in Dr. Frederick Jackisch (retired); or Aurora Smith, my warm, loving, and gifted vocal coach, wife of Dr. Orcenith Smith, head of theVoice Dept, who had = had the joy of being the first female student assistant to Dr. Clarence Dickinson at Union Theological Seminary in her own "school" days; or the Fulbright scholar, church and concert organist/harpsichordist who is now Chair of the School of Music, my mentor and friend Trudy Faber. Little do we know.   Dale G. Rider Independence, MO, USA    
(back) Subject: RE: Funerals--location and singing From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 14:34:42 -0500   Bud writes:   > If this is NOT the case, and the body is cremated BEFORE Requiem and=20 Absolutions are sung, everything is still carried out as above. The body =   is regarded as being "morally present", much as when a person is lost at =   sea (or in space, these days). The catafalque (the platform for the=20 coffin) is set up; the urn is placed under the pall on top of it, and=20 everything is done as usual.   Thank you, Bud, for your entire explanation. I should print it out and = put it in a folder next to my will. Although I've been an = Anglo-Catholic most of my life, I haven't quite died yet, so I'm not up = on all these details :-)   It would appear, then, from the above that the distinction that someone = carefully drew yesterday, between "funeral" (with the body present) and = "memorial service" (without the body, but perhaps with ashes) is not = applicable to the anglo-catholic tradition-- or perhaps we make a = different distinction. That was actually always my understanding or = assumption anyway, so I couldn't quite see why one should be careful to = maintain the distinction in that way. It seems to me that *everyone* is = entitled to have one funeral, whether the remains are intact or not. = (If you're someone like Princess Di, you might get two funerals, one for = the public and one for the family. Rumor has it that her private = funeral adhered considerably more to Anglo-Catholic standards than the = media event in Westminster Abbey had done). One or more memorial = services (of which I suppose a regular endowed requiem would be just one = type) might be held additionally, either considerably later or in other = locales (as when a person well-known in Philadelphia has moved to = Florida, dies and is buried there, there might be a memorial service in = Philadelphia). Am I right?        
(back) Subject: Re: Funerals--location and singing From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 12:27:21 -0800       Emmons, Paul wrote:   > Bud writes: > > >> If this is NOT the case, and the body is cremated BEFORE Requiem >> and > > Absolutions are sung, everything is still carried out as above. The > body is regarded as being "morally present", much as when a person is > lost at sea (or in space, these days). The catafalque (the platform > for the coffin) is set up; the urn is placed under the pall on top of > it, and everything is done as usual. > Paul:   > Thank you, Bud, for your entire explanation. I should print it out > and put it in a folder next to my will. Although I've been an > Anglo-Catholic most of my life, I haven't quite died yet, so I'm not > up on all these details :-) > > It would appear, then, from the above that the distinction that > someone carefully drew yesterday, between "funeral" (with the body > present) and "memorial service" (without the body, but perhaps with > ashes) is not applicable to the anglo-catholic tradition-- or perhaps > we make a different distinction.   Correct. For every faithful Churchman, there should be a "funeral Mass" with full obsequies, whether or not the body is present.   "Memorial services" of the protestant type, where people get up and talk about the deceased, play and sing his favorite songs, read his favorite poetry, etc. are unknown among Anglican and Roman Catholics, and, needless to say, the Eastern Orthodox as well.   That is properly done informally at the WAKE, following the Rosary or Office of the Dead.   The service in church is SOLELY to commend the soul of the departed to GOD, nothing more, nothing less. It is NOT, as some are fond of saying, "for the living." That's why in a strict Requiem, the Kiss of Peace is not given, and the Agnus Dei is changed to read "give them rest, give them rest, give them rest everlasting." A Requiem Mass is NOT for the living; it is for the DEAD alone. Formerly, Holy Communion wasn't given at a Requiem for the same reason, though I agree with the relaxation of that particular rubric.   Requiems should also be said   1. on the day of death, if possible 2. on the third day after death 3. on the seventh day after death 4. on the ninth day after death 5. on the 30th day after death 6. once a month for a year 7. once a year on the anniversary of the day of death for a generation (20 years) 8. pious custom may add to that the deceased person's birthday, wedding anniversary, anniversary of ordination, etc.   Those could be termed "memorial Masses," though the 30th day Mass is called "The Month's Mind."   More recent Roman rules permit Mass intentions for the dead to be offered at non-Requiem Masses.   Formerly, it was the custom to send a Mass stipend to a monastery where a novena of Requiems would be offered for nine continuous days, beginning as soon as possible after the day of death ... a pious custom now sadly neglected.   That was actually always my > understanding or assumption anyway, so I couldn't quite see why one > should be careful to maintain the distinction in that way. It seems > to me that *everyone* is entitled to have one funeral, whether the > remains are intact or not.   The saying is: "no one should be buried without a Mass."   (If you're someone like Princess Di, you > might get two funerals, one for the public and one for the family. > Rumor has it that her private funeral adhered considerably more to > Anglo-Catholic standards than the media event in Westminster Abbey > had done). One or more memorial services (of which I suppose a > regular endowed requiem would be just one type) might be held > additionally, either considerably later or in other locales (as when > a person well-known in Philadelphia has moved to Florida, dies and is > buried there, there might be a memorial service in Philadelphia). Am > I right?   Yes. My will leaves Mass stipends for Masses to be said in the principal churches where I've been organist, or where my family is connected: St. Paul's, Winter Haven FL, St. Luke's, Mulberry FL, St. David's, Lakeland FL, Annunciation of Our Blessed Lady, Anna Maria Island, FL, St. James, Cleveland OH, Holy Rosary, Cleveland, OH, Old St. Mary's, Cincinnati OH, St. Stephen's, Beaumont CA, St. Paul's Cathedral, San Diego, CA   Holy Rosary and Old St. Mary's never batted an eye at the fact I was an Anglican (chuckle). It used to be forbidden to offer Requiems for non-Roman Catholics, but I think that went by the boards after Vatican II.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Funerals--location and singing From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 15:25:09 -0500   On 1/14/04 2:34 PM, "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> wrote:   > either considerably later or in other locales (as when a person = well-known in > Philadelphia has moved to Florida, dies and is buried there, there might = be a > memorial service in Philadelphia). Am I right?   I''m hoping Bud says "yes," as it certainly makes sense to me (even though not relevant my own case).   Alan (who liked all the rest of reasoning as well)    
(back) Subject: In search of a one-time New York organist From: "Tom Jones" <tomj@netpath.net> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 16:12:47 -0500   Greetings. Family lore says a second cousin of mine was an organist at a large = New York City church, probably in the 1920s, 1930s or 1940s. He or she = was a child of Ira B. Iseley, who was the chief of police in Greensboro, = N.C., about 1920. Ira had four children--Fred, Lula Mae, Marvin and = Sarah. Fred Iseley seems the best candidate. He's known to have lived in = New York, married, had a child, been hurt in a traffic accident, and = then fallen in love with his nurse and left his wife and child. But it = could have been one of his siblings: Lula Mae Iseley Butterfield; Marvin = Iseley, who family lore says was a military man; or Sarah Iseley, whose = married name I don't know. While "Iseley" is the correct spelling for this branch of the = family, the name may be known under another spelling--Isley, Eisele, = etc. Does any of this ring any bells?   Regards, Tom Jones (whose mother was an Iseley)    
(back) Subject: RE: Funerals--location and singing From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 16:20:23 -0500   > Holy Rosary and Old St. Mary's never batted an eye at the fact I was = an=20 Anglican (chuckle). It used to be forbidden to offer Requiems for=20 non-Roman Catholics, but I think that went by the boards after Vatican = II.   If that were still true, then my late friend Brian Burgess could not = have had his funeral requiem at Sacred Heart, Webster, Mass., where he = was O/C, because he remained officially an Anglican. A few years ago, = we went together one evening to some special Holy Day mass at Church of = the Advent, Boston, and he was teary-eyed at its beauty and dignity-- = one can sometimes forget how much they mean when you're elsewhere for = awhile, and perhaps that's a mercy. =20   The like had also happened ca. 1978 with another friend when we were = visiting Chicago from downstate and I got him to go with me to the = Church of the Ascension on Sunday morning. Bill was a very lapsed Roman = Catholic, I'd concluded a total heathen, and not musical, either. But = there he was weeping during the elevation. He didn't know that things = were still being done like that anywhere. =20   Brian went to Communion at Sacred Heart, but this was an exception made = by Fr. Roy, whom he described as "pretty conservative". Non-RCs were to = content themselves with a blessing at his requiem.      
(back) Subject: RE: Funerals--location and singing From: "Erik Johnson" <the_maitre@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 17:11:24 -0500   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Re: Westminster Hymnal (x post) From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 17:19:00 -0500   Almost anything, Victoria. Herr Busch doesn't seem to know his people need =   good healthcare. We cannot get it unless we are very well healed. (There's =   a funny in there somewhere.) (8-)   Oh, my, am I sounding bitter here? I know, what a novel idea it is that a government should "promote the general Welfare"!   Victoria wrote:   >I think it's possible to get ANYTHING in the U.S. <g> >    
(back) Subject: RE: Westminster Hymnal (x post) From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 16:16:08 -0600   Stop this now.   =20   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Cole Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2004 4:19 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Westminster Hymnal (x post)   =20   Almost anything, Victoria. Herr Busch doesn't seem to know his people need good healthcare. We cannot get it unless we are very well healed. (There's a funny in there somewhere.) (8-)   Oh, my, am I sounding bitter here? I know, what a novel idea it is that a government should "promote the general Welfare"!   Victoria wrote:         I think it's possible to get ANYTHING in the U.S. <g> =20      
(back) Subject: Re: Calvary Baptist Church, Manhattan From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 17:35:48 -0500   ROFALMAO. Context is also quite important. "Gladly, the cross-eyed bear", "Lord, who threw out these forty days", and of course the Andy Song "Andy walked with me; Andy talked with me".   Victoria wrote: >Punctuation is SO very important. To quote Benny Hill, "What's that in >the road? A head?" OR, "What's this thing called, love?" <g>   And then Benny Hill asks, "How do you say, 'Come here" in French?" He answers his own question, <<Venez ici.>> Again he asks, "How do you say, 'Go over there' in French?" He answers himself once more, "You go over there and say, <Venez ici.>   And, again, I am ROFALMAO.   Ross C "Cole" Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA      
(back) Subject: Small new organ in the works... From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 18:06:12 EST   Dear Listers: I am pleased to announce that my firm has been chosen from among three =   invited bidders to create a small "orgue d'accompagnement" of eleven ranks = for the rear choir gallery of Our Lady of Loretto Church in Cold Spring, New = York. The organ will be freestanding in a painted gothic case, with the burnished basses of the 8' Open Diapason in the facade. The specification = will be as follows:   GREAT - Manual I 8' Open Diapason (56 pipes, metal) 8' Open Wood Flute (56 pipes, 1-12 stopped) 4' Principal (56 pipes, metal) 2' Doublet (56 pipes, metal) 8' Hautboy (by transmission from Swell) Swell to Great* Swell to Great Octaves   SWELL - Manual II 8' Salicional (56 pipes, metal) 8' Voix Celeste (44 pipes, metal, from C13) 8' Stopped Diapason (56 pipes, wood) 4' Harmonic Flute (56 pipes, metal, [1-12 wood]) 8' Hautboy (56 pipes, metal, open, Bertouneche schallots) Tremulant Swell Octaves   PEDAL 16' Open Wood Bass (30 pipes, internal wood tuning sleeves) 16' Stopped Bass (30 pipes, wood) 8' Octave (by transmission from Great) 8' Hautboy (by transmission from Swell) Great to Pedal* Swell to Pedal* Swell to Pedal Octaves   *The three unison couplers will be reversible by toe spoons above the = pedal clavier   Sebastian M. Gluck Tonal Director Gluck New York Pipe Organ Restorers and Builders   ..  
(back) Subject: RE: Small new organ in the works... From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 17:04:50 -0600       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of TubaMagna@aol.com Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2004 5:06 PM To: PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu; pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Small new organ in the works...   Dear Listers: I am pleased to announce that my firm has been chosen from among three=20 invited bidders to create a small "orgue d'accompagnement" of eleven ranks for=20 the rear choir gallery of Our Lady of Loretto Church in Cold Spring, New York. The organ will be freestanding in a painted gothic case, with the=20 burnished basses of the 8' Open Diapason in the facade. The specification will be as=20 follows:   GREAT - Manual I 8' Open Diapason (56 pipes, metal) 8' Open Wood Flute (56 pipes, 1-12 stopped) 4' Principal (56 pipes, metal) 2' Doublet (56 pipes, metal) 8' Hautboy (by transmission from Swell) Swell to Great* Swell to Great Octaves   SWELL - Manual II 8' Salicional (56 pipes, metal) 8' Voix Celeste (44 pipes, metal, from C13) 8' Stopped Diapason (56 pipes, wood) 4' Harmonic Flute (56 pipes, metal, [1-12 wood]) 8' Hautboy (56 pipes, metal, open, Bertouneche schallots) Tremulant Swell Octaves   PEDAL 16' Open Wood Bass (30 pipes, internal wood tuning sleeves) 16' Stopped Bass (30 pipes, wood) 8' Octave (by transmission from Great) 8' Hautboy (by transmission from Swell) Great to Pedal* Swell to Pedal* Swell to Pedal Octaves   *The three unison couplers will be reversible by toe spoons above the pedal=20 clavier   Sebastian M. Gluck Tonal Director Gluck New York Pipe Organ Restorers and Builders   .. "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Overture Hall, Madison WI. From: "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 17:12:19 -0600   Here's an article on the progress of Overture Hall's organ in this afternoon's Capital Times.   http://www.madison.com/captimes/features/stories/65184.php   Mike Franch Madison, WI   _________________________________________________________________ Check out the new MSN 9 Dial-up =97 fast & reliable Internet access with = prime features! http://join.msn.com/?pgmarket=3Den-us&page=3Ddialup/home&ST=3D1