PipeChat Digest #4222 - Thursday, January 15, 2004
 
Re: Westminster Hymnal (x post)
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
RE: "reycling" pipe organs
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Resultant 16'
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
RE: Small new organ in the works...
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: "reycling" pipe organs
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Recycled Organs
  by "Jason M. Taylor" <Jason.M.Taylor@verizon.net>
RE: Recycled Organs
  by "Elders, Craig" <c.elders@tcu.edu>
RE: "reycling" pipe organs
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: Recycled Organs
  by "atal" <atal@sympatico.ca>
hypothetical question
  by "atal" <atal@sympatico.ca>
Re: hypothetical question
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: hypothetical question
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: a challenge
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
RE: Small new organ in the works...
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Preserving musical instruments
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Small Organs for Keith
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
RE: Small new organ in the works
  by "Maynard Schutt" <hms@hamtech.org>
re small organ recording;
  by "Maynard Schutt" <hms@hamtech.org>
Regarding that small new organ...
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Westminster Hymnal (x post) From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 04:09:45 -0600   <clip> Just like the pooooor liberals ....   Typical.   <clip> to denigrate someone who has actually done something good for the = whole world.   What "good" is that? Unjustified war is not good. Alienating most of = the civilized World is not good. Lying to the UN, Congress, and the = American people to market a political product is not good. 9 million = people out of work is not good. American Citizens held without due = process is not good. Limiting of Civil Rights, Association, Protest, = and Speech is not good....   <clip> Besides , it's not the governments place to dictate to citizens = how health care should be managed.   I see, just about everything else. I stand corrected.   <clip> YOU and folks like you are FAR closer to nazi's than we = republicans are . B.A.F.   This comment is outrageous. However, it does make my point....Personal = attacks of this nature are unnecessary and childish. As I said. Get = over yourself.   Now to get back on topic ... I recently had the opportunity to hear the = 29 rank 1887 Steers and Turner organ at First Presbyterian Church in = Chippewa Falls, WI recently rebuilt and enlarged by the Bedient Company. = It is magnificent! You can learn more about the organ at = bedientorgan.com/news.html .   Again, my apologies to the List for my off topic comments. I will say = no more of a political nature here.   Tim       --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.561 / Virus Database: 353 - Release Date: 1/13/2004  
(back) Subject: RE: "reycling" pipe organs From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 07:05:08 -0600   How about "pre-owned", like Lexus and Honda?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Richard Schneider Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2004 10:09 PM To: PipeChat Subject: "reycling" pipe organs   Stanley Lowkis wrote:   > A much better term is "reborn" pipe organ.   I like Larry Chace's "pet" term of "experienced" pipe organs!   Faithfully,   G.A.   (Who owns more "experienced" organ parts than ANYBODY ELSE in the entire Universe!)   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO <>< Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: RE: Resultant 16' From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 10:05:07 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   The Beuchet-Debierre portatif [Ha! it weights the same as a small car!] = in the Nuestra Se=F1ora de Lourdes Church in Caracas has the first Bourdon 1= 6' octave in resultants from the Bourdon 8'.   The organist still hears the CC-GG fifth sounding, but a yard or two away from the small organ the "resultant" 16' is clearly audible. The Patres at the church wondered about this phenomenon and asked the fir= m if this was a defect of the organ. The firm responded in a letter that th= e resultant was an "tres classique" resource in organ building to save spac= e and material, therefore no defect.   BTW Beuchet Debierre organs are almost the same quality in workmanship an= d sound as Cavaille-Coll.   Cheers Andres    
(back) Subject: RE: Small new organ in the works... From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 10:07:20 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Congrats!   The stop list is interesting: Two 8' hautboys and no mutations. This would have been unthinkable some 20 years ago!   > Great to Pedal* > Swell to Pedal* > Swell to Pedal Octaves > > *The three unison couplers will be reversible by toe spoons above the pedal > clavier   Hmmmm... *three* unison couplers? :)   Cheers Andres        
(back) Subject: Re: "reycling" pipe organs From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 09:06:24 EST   Or "Second Career"?    
(back) Subject: Recycled Organs From: "Jason M. Taylor" <Jason.M.Taylor@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 09:19:35 -0500   Perhaps a good method for handling comments on a "used" organ is to = refer to it as a "newly installed" organ.   Jay Taylor  
(back) Subject: RE: Recycled Organs From: "Elders, Craig" <c.elders@tcu.edu> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 08:36:30 -0600   I have always liked "Experienced" Organs or "Experienced" Pipework! =20 Craig Elders    
(back) Subject: RE: "reycling" pipe organs From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 11:37:56 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.net   ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2004 10:20 PM Subject: "reycling" pipe organs     > Maybe we should avoid the term "recycle," <SNIP ETC>   Yeap- after having dealed with recycled plastic and fresh plastic; a "recycled" refrigerator that lasted for exactly two hours (and due to a "limited warranty" wasn't repaired or replaced) vs. a new refrigerator; or "recycled" automotive parts vs. new automotive parts for example I can = only agree with that. Since 80% of the average people don't know a darn about pipe organs they associate one idea with another; the results are as noted. My clients too said: "Hey, be sure to mount *new* spare parts and materials in that organ, huh?- we want a *lasting* work done there, even when it costs more money!" (Since the exchange market is closed I have to recycle, however!)   And then come the cases of unexperienced people who install an organ that was tailored for a specific room and accoustics in another completely different room without criterium. All this contributes to the basically unjustified 'odium' about second hand organs or organ parts.   Andres (a little late in this thread :) =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: Re: Recycled Organs From: "atal" <atal@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 10:18:48 -0500   I'll quote a former colleague (clergy) who had a way of finding elegant = and sensitive descriptions (not). In this case, a previously married = woman: "used goods" (cringe)   Andreas Thiel ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Elders, Craig=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Thursday, January 15, 2004 9:36 AM Subject: RE: Recycled Organs     I have always liked "Experienced" Organs or "Experienced" Pipework!   Craig Elders  
(back) Subject: hypothetical question From: "atal" <atal@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 10:23:31 -0500   Here's a hypothetical question addressed primarily to my fellow Canadians, but certainly open to all others:   Which organist would you be willing to drive up to 2 hrs. to hear in recital? And why? (e.g. previous experience, reputation, etc.)   Thanks in advance for your passionate replies.   Andreas Thiel Director of Music St. Marys United Church St. Marys, Ontario Canada atal@sympatico.ca    
(back) Subject: Re: hypothetical question From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 10:49:55 -0500   At 10:23 AM 2004-01-15 -0500, you wrote: >Here's a hypothetical question addressed primarily to my fellow = Canadians, >but certainly open to all others: > >Which organist would you be willing to drive up to 2 hrs. to hear in >recital? And why? (e.g. previous experience, reputation, etc.) > >Thanks in advance for your passionate replies. > >Andreas Thiel >Director of Music >St. Marys United Church >St. Marys, Ontario Canada >atal@sympatico.ca   Hi fellow Canadian,   Being from the Toronto area, I can only tell you from the ones I know about, or have heard, but the following come to mind,   1) John Van der Tuin, from Brantford. He is blind, but that doesn't make him any less capable at the console. Has a wonderful sense of rhythm, and =   registration.   2) John Tuttle from Toronto. Organist at St. Thomas, Huron Street in Toronto. fabulous technique, very solid playing all-around   3) Willian O'Meara, Toronto, organist at Our Lady of Sorrows RC in Toronto. very versatile organist, plays Bach to Jazz as well as theatre organ (accompanies silent movies etc.).. A very interesting organist to listen to.   Beyond that I don't know too many within a 2 hour drive of St. Mary's, = that are worth the drive.   Regards,   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263      
(back) Subject: Re: hypothetical question From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 07:52:26 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Here in the UK, definitely David Briggs, if only for the superb French style improvisations he does with disarming ease. (He studied the art in Paris). A magnificent performer by any standards.   Carlo Curley for his usual display of technique combined with an easy, southern style of American humour.   Kevin Bowyer and Simon Preston are superb performers of Reger's music, which is close to my heart.   Jane Parker-Smith was, and probably still is, the supreme Uk interpreter of French Romantic music....always worth the effort of travelling.   I have never failed to enjoy hearing Jos van der Kooy at Haarlem, so he is "probably" the one performer I do actually travel a long way to hear each year.   On the lighter side, I have certainly travelled a good distance to hear the UK theatre organist Simon Gledhill.....such a musical performer with a fine technique and a complete mastery of the instrument.   Jim Riggs, if he actually comes to the UK again.   Finally, people keep telling me that I MUST hear Felix Hell, but as that would involve a 400 mile flight one way, or a 4,000 mile flight the other way, I shall put this in my forward planner!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- atal <atal@sympatico.ca> wrote: > > Which organist would you be willing to drive up to 2 > hrs. to hear in > recital? And why?   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Hotjobs: Enter the "Signing Bonus" Sweepstakes http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/signingbonus  
(back) Subject: RE: a challenge From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 09:56:11 -0600   Dear Mike and list,   Nothing like a dose of reality! This line of thinking was why I gravitated toward something more specialized -- like the two Aeolian-Skinners I mentioned. =20   It seemed to me in my musings that a handsome space could be created for a modest amount of pipework above the stage, so that there would be both a visual and aural presence for the audience to perceive. This set of components and voices could then be augmented with digital equipment placed in less obvious locations (forward terrace boxes on either side of the stage, flyspace, etc.). =20   Thus the organ could be used as a continuo instrument, for choral accompaniment, and for orchestral works that include an organ part. I don't foresee this becoming a recital instrument except in the most limited sense. (I'm harking back to the late 60s, when Luigi Tagliavini played the Trio Sonatas on the little portable Schlicker that briefly lived in Cornell's Bailey Hall; the performances were so divine nobody could focus on the fact that this was really a pretty narrowly conceived instrument.)   Carlo Curley has made a recording on an organ like this in a church in Sweden, and my conversations with him make me think this might be a possible approach here. Of course recordings are not real, but in this instance I find the music in command.   Peter=20   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Mike Gettelman Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2004 7:50 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: a challenge   Dear Peter, This is certainly an exciting situation for anyone in the organ community. Filling an empty space that possesses a great acoustic with organ sound, is a dream scenario for all of us. Far be it for me to splash cold water on this dream, but I think one needs to take a hard look at the one person who will determine what will be done with any kind of organ that might be installed. The music director of any major symphonic venue controls everything about the type of music that will be presented, and the frequency of it. I draw your attention to the magnificent E.M. Skinner restoration done by Schantz at Severance Hall. Granted the instrument was already there, (albeit buried so deeply in the attic as to be nearly useless) but the money spent to relocate and restore it could easily have generated a completely new instrument, so there is some parallel to your situation. Now that the restoration is complete, the dedication behind us, and the future realized, what have we to show for all the money spent and the enthusiasm generated. Currently there are just 4 major organ recitals a year. Throw in a couple more ensemble performances with orchestra and choral groups, and we have a tremendous instrument that is so under utilized that patrons of Severance Hall would not even know there is an organ there, if not for the glorious facade. Even at the major recitals, more than half the house is empty. Therefore, I suggest that before any proposals to install an organ are even considered, it would be best to do some rigorous research into the market for patron acceptance for the instrument, and the music director's attitude toward using the instrument, and allowing a reasonable amount of time for performances that justify the huge investment. If prestige and bragging rights are sufficient reasons to have an organ installed permanently in the Oklahoma City Philharmonic Hall, then by all means, give an organ builder the mandate, but if 3 or 4 performances a year are all you can count on, just wheel in a rental Allen or another, and take the massive amount of money saved to be applied towards musical performance that will be more widely recieved. Sincerely Mike Gettelman   "Storandt, Peter" wrote:   > Dear List: > > Thanks to Mike for this update. Reading the article brings to mind a > challenge I conceived during the intermission of last Saturday evening's > Oklahoma City Philharmonic concert in our fabulous "new" concert space > built within the original Art-Deco-era municipal music hall shell. > Perhaps some of you would like to ponder the matter as well. > > Our new room is presently organ-less, though its predecessor space (much > larger, and used for many purposes) had a good-sized Kimball. (The > Kimball is to be reassembled in our state's new history museum now > nearing completion.) The orchestra will be performing the Saint-Saens > Third Symphony in May, with a guess-what brought in for the occasion. > > My challenge: what type of instrument would suit our new hall should one > be added in the future? A dedicated, full-sized pipe instrument is > probably out of the question for cost and space reasons. But what about > something along the lines of the Tanglewood Shed and Metropolitan Opera > House Aeolian-Skinners? Could there be such an organ built here that > would satisfy the needs of the orchestra and the choral groups who > perform regularly? Should it be a combination organ, similar to others > now appearing on the scene, with some of the stop families arising from > silicon origins? I would be most interested in seeing what list members > might suggest for a limited-purpose house instrument. > > For your reference, here is a look at the room: > http://www.okcciviccenter.org/home.asp > > What say you? I guess I should say, don't enter this "contest" for > purposes of doing a variation on pipes vs. electronics. > > Thanks, > > Peter >   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: RE: Small new organ in the works... From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 07:58:11 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   In view of the lack of mutations, I think Sebastian should include Tierce and Quint couplers!   They seem to work on the Wurlitzer at Blackpool Tower, here in the UK.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Andr=E9s G=FCnther <agun@telcel.net.ve> wrote: > Andres Gunther > agun@telcel.net.ve > > Congrats! > > The stop list is interesting: Two 8' hautboys and no > mutations. This would > have been unthinkable some 20 years ago! > > > Great to Pedal* > > Swell to Pedal* > > Swell to Pedal Octaves > > > > *The three unison couplers will be reversible by > toe spoons above the > pedal > > clavier > > Hmmmm... *three* unison couplers? :) > >   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Hotjobs: Enter the "Signing Bonus" Sweepstakes http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/signingbonus  
(back) Subject: Preserving musical instruments From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 11:24:53 EST   Now that we've gotten the humor out of our systems, we really MUST be more serious and careful about how we refer to historic material that is incorporated into new organs, and how we present the concept of = transferring historical material from one place to another. "Used" and "old" have immediate and irreversible connotations when presented to clients here in the United States. It's just part of our = culture. Humorous euphemisms come across as feeble, and never, ever work. Other = nations set aside Heritage Funds to restore their pipe organs, while Americans don't = even want to pay the taxes that get their garbage hauled away. Educating somebody to understand that sixty- or seventy-year-old organ =   pipes were good enough to last the bulk of a century, and are an enduring = part of their investment, will go a long way toward getting the "bigger is = better" organ that so many Americans so desperately crave. Those old "tubby" Great =   pipes might just be perfectly scaled for a contemporary Pedal chorus, and = save many, many thousands of dollars. Likewise, moving an historic instrument from one building to another doesn't mean that the organ is bad. Remember the spectacular Hook at Saint =   Alphonsus that wss transferrred to its new home in New Haven? That = breathtaking masterpiece had nothing wrong with it musically; the building had a minor = problem of having cracked in half, since it was built on a canal filled in with = 17th century Dutch refuse. It was the building that had to go, not the organ.   Sebastian M. Gluck Who had hoped to age gracefully, into a "distinguished gentleman," not a "pile of old pipes destined for the scrap heap."   ..  
(back) Subject: Small Organs for Keith From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 10:48:15 -0600   Keith asked about recordings of small organs............I suggest the recordings from the various Organ Historical Society conventions............great stuff, I think. Most will be smaller organs, though if you're looking for "new" sounds, you basically won't find it here, obviously.   Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower        
(back) Subject: RE: Small new organ in the works From: "Maynard Schutt" <hms@hamtech.org> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 10:06:38 -0500   Hi Keith...this is my first time in pipechat...I too am an amateur organist, who has played the worlds largest pipe organ in Atlantic City, and 125 others;   We have a long- play recording of E. Power Biggs playing the oldest playable organ in the world, built in 1390, in Sion, Switzerland   Just thought I would toss this in as food for thought;   I am just new to the list, and enjoy it very much;   Cheerio, Maynard.     At 10:19 PM 1/14/04 -0500, you wrote: >As everyone can tell, I'm an amateur self-taught organist. Anyway, I = like >the stoplist. From what I've gathered from this list in the past, this = is >an organ designed around a particular purpose. > >Seb, I would love to get a recording of this or any other organ of its = size. >So many organ recordings are of the very large organs. For me, these >recordings are a tease, since I will most likely never be in a situation = in >which I have easy or ready access to such an organ. These smaller organs >are more like what I would have. In fact, the one I'm fixing up - with >professional help, of course - is about 11 ranks. Hearing music played = on >smaller organs by accomplished organists gives me a better idea of what = kind >of sound I can have in my own organ. > >If anyone has suggestions for recordings by fine organists on small = organs, >please post them. If no one else is interested, please respond = privately. > >Thanks, >Keith > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: re small organ recording; From: "Maynard Schutt" <hms@hamtech.org> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 10:42:55 -0500   Hi Keith; This is my first note to Pipechat...I too am a self-taught organist, but have played the world's largest pipe organ, in Atlantic City =   , USA and 125 others;   We have a long-play recording of E. Power Biggs playing a very small, world's oldest playable pipe organ, in Sion, Switzerlanad.   I have just joined the list & enjoy it very much, at 29 C degrees below in =   Canada.   Cheerio, Maynard       At 10:19 PM 1/14/04 -0500, you wrote: >As everyone can tell, I'm an amateur self-taught organist. Anyway, I = like >the stoplist. From what I've gathered from this list in the past, this = is >an organ designed around a particular purpose. > >Seb, I would love to get a recording of this or any other organ of its = size. >So many organ recordings are of the very large organs. For me, these >recordings are a tease, since I will most likely never be in a situation = in >which I have easy or ready access to such an organ. These smaller organs >are more like what I would have. In fact, the one I'm fixing up - with >professional help, of course - is about 11 ranks. Hearing music played = on >smaller organs by accomplished organists gives me a better idea of what = kind >of sound I can have in my own organ. > >If anyone has suggestions for recordings by fine organists on small = organs, >please post them. If no one else is interested, please respond = privately. > >Thanks, >Keith > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Regarding that small new organ... From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 11:49:52 EST   Several questions have come in regarding our upcoming instrument for Our = Lady of Loretto, so I'll answer as may as possible before I leave sub-freezing = NYC for warmer climes:   There was little space, and little money, yet a strong commitment to a =   quality pipe organ. They were being heavily pressured by the authorities = to get a big combo organ, mostly digital, with lots of upperwork, for this = intimate and beautifully restored church. They needed an organ to accompany the choir, with singing, warm tone, enough to fill the room, hence the leaning toward the French plan. The = church has no absorptive material, and even added an inlaid marble floor to the = restored chancel. Some portions of five of the ranks are going to be restored from the remnants of an 1872 Stuart organ that had been savagely butchered by a = long succession of "experts" and "organ techs." With only 40% of that = historical material intact, and 100% of that 40% damaged or altered, we are doing the best we = can to recapture the sound. Fortunately, they did not hack at the cutups. This =   was the second home for the Stuart organ, although its original location = remains unknown. It was moved at the turn of the last century, rather poorly, by a =   local clergyman who was definitely not an organbuilder. It had since had = the great chest replaced, and converted to modern reservoirs and a noisy = blower. Many modifications had been made to the action, rendering it difficult to play = by most any organist. The new keydesk will conform to AGO measurements. There are no mutations because there was no space, money, or stylistic =   reason to include them. There are NOT two (or three) Hautboy stops; it is = the one stop that I felt should be available at all three locations for = flexibility, and the transmission is indicated on the drawknobs. Likewise, the facade pipes of the 8' Open Diapason are playable in the Pedal as the 8' Octave. There are three unison couplers (II/I, I/Ped, II/Ped). They have reversible cuilleres above the pedalboard. The octave couplers were = included for flexibility in softer combinations, but are not intended to "make" the = organ. There is no combination action. The instrument does not require one, = and we did not wish to put the client's money into a combination action for an =   eleven-rank organ. The keydesk will be built into the body of the case, = "en fenetre," with the knobs in vertical rows flanking the keyboards. The = console interior will be walnut, with figured maple jambs, pao ferro drawknobs, = and rosewood accidentals for both manuals and pedal. The two 16' wood pedal stops (Open and Stopped) are intended to = provide a strong foundation under singing. We have found that using a single 16' stopped voice tends to force a builder to make it either too large or too = small. Two stops leaves the organist with THREE options at 16' pitch, plus the recombinant effects available via the two transmitted 8' manual stops. And yes, Rodney, it's two blocks from the river -- I'll find out where =   you can tie up. There's a decent restaurant right at the train tracks that = skirt the banks. Just hold on when you sail past West Point.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City Back in a week, unless I find email in Europe and figure out how to use it   ..