PipeChat Digest #4236 - Tuesday, January 20, 2004
 
Re: weddings, fees, organists, et. al.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Franck Priere (was [LONG] Favorite composers, favorite	performers, an
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Clergy Wedding Fees -- a "retraction" if you will
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Priere
  by <RSiegel920@aol.com>
Re: priere
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: priere
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: priere
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Star Spangled Banner
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: Star Spangled Banner
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Star Spangled Banner
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Stravinsky's Star Spangled Banner
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
This Saturday - Dennis James - Santa Barbara - Arlington Theatre
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
This Saturday - Dennis James - Santa Barbara - Arlington Theatre
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
"Live and Learn."
  by "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com>
Re: Star Spangled Banner
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: weddings, fees, organists, et. al. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 21:09:11 -0500   On 1/19/04 7:53 PM, "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> wrote:   > Alan, I think you and I are not so very far apart. Your tradition is = much > more formal and liturgical than mine, but taking that into account, what = I > tend to hear/see is like this: > > 1. Alan's Policy: Firm and strict, but with potential for exceptions. > > 2. Dennis' Policy: Looser to begin with, so we come out about the same > place!   I think you're pretty right. Let me look at more tomorrow, but I think we're quite close. And I like that.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Franck Priere (was [LONG] Favorite composers, favorite performers, and odometer readings From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 21:16:12 -0500   on 1/19/04 8:39 PM, Glenda at gksjd85@direcway.com wrote:   > Wouldn't the fact that it is so blooming hard be an attraction for some > recitalists? I will admit that the two-against-three was my kryptonite, > even more so than the key signatures. But it is so lovely. >=20 > I used to wonder, before I tried it, why everyone complained about > Franck. Ah, the naivete of youth - I'm much older now. >=20 > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com >=20 > Well, Glenda, the problem is that it doesn't _sound_ hard to those who don'= t know the score. It's just the opposite of those flashy pieces that sound virtuosic but aren't. So in a cost-benefit analysis, it's maybe not the best choice for a recital program. Unless one's listeners are cognoscenti. Or one is a saint.   Speaking of Franck, one of the joys of my present gig is that we have communion every other Sunday and it takes about eight to ten minutes for everyone to go up to the rail. It's just perfect for playing meditative pieces that I don't want to play for a prelude because folks would just tal= k throughout. They keep a bit quieter during communion, as if they were really worshipping. So yesterday I played Franck's Cantabile (and still ha= d time for them to sing a hymn before and to play an improvisation on Dear Lord and Father of Mankind (Rest) afterwards. I played it with a softer registration (voix humaine instead of trompette) than Franck called for, to fit the situation. I see in Cantagrel's Guide de la Musique d'Orgue that someone has discovered "discreet allusions" in it to Wagner's Tristan and Isolde, "which would tend to rule out a liturgical purpose. Is it not a veritable duo d'amour?" Franck was probably daydreaming again about August= a Holmes.   Dale Rider, you write of Philip James' "M=E9ditation =E0 Ste. Clothilde". I have the score, but have never been able to get it to sound as well as you describe. I'll get it out and try again. Yes, there are a lot of "Meditations" out there. But I'm looking for "Pri=E8res" only!   You write: "'Prelude on a Franck Motif'" by Gordon Young is a lovely gem, as well, quoting fragments from "Cantabile" which is also a wonderful prayer." That sounds really interesting. I will definitely look for it.   By the way, for the prelude I played a very saucy little trio in C by Krebs= .. It's the one on page 94 (if I recall correctly) of the Breitkopf edition. What a hoot! Roccoco irony.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Clergy Wedding Fees -- a "retraction" if you will From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 21:22:37 -0500   On 1/19/04 8:51 PM, "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> wrote:   > This condition has happened only once to me, and it came from a priest = whom I > greatly enjoyed working for in almost every other respect. But it = rather > rankled and it's not fair.   Absolutely right, Paul Emmons! That parish should recompense you, VERY fairly for every minute and effort of what you do. In a sense, what they pay the parish is none of your business. But the PARISH should make sure that YOU are paid, fully, fairly, and without delay. Just no question or uncertainty ABOUT it!   (I've been trying to say this, but doing it so badly, so I'm trying to be MORE and more clear about it.)   You should get it, fully, fairly, and without delay. And without any = delay or uncertainty about its forthcomingness!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Priere From: <RSiegel920@aol.com> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 21:29:13 EST   Boellmann's from his first suite.......will probably be the 15th to = mention the same:) regards Dick Siegel    
(back) Subject: Re: priere From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 20:46:31 -0600   Hi! There is a beautiful little piece entitled "Priere" by Rene Vierne, Louis' brother. It has very easy piece with few pedal indications, but it is gorgeous. The only place I know it is published is in a collection of French Organ Pieces edited by Alexander Schriner. I don't have the music here with me now or I'd let you know specifics. Incidentally, this was my offertory this past Sunday, along with "Prelude a 5" by Lemmens for the prelude and "Fanfare" by Lemmens for the postlude.     Blessings, Beau Surratt Minister of Worship and Music United Church of Hyde Park, Chicago      
(back) Subject: Re: priere From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 21:52:25 -0500   on 1/19/04 9:46 PM, Beau Surratt at Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com wrote:   > Hi! > There is a beautiful little piece entitled "Priere" by Rene Vierne, > Louis' brother. It has very easy piece with few pedal indications, but = it > is gorgeous. The only place I know it is published is in a collection of > French Organ Pieces edited by Alexander Schriner. I don't have the music > here with me now or I'd let you know specifics. Incidentally, this was = my > offertory this past Sunday, along with "Prelude a 5" by Lemmens for the > prelude and "Fanfare" by Lemmens for the postlude. > > > Blessings, > Beau Surratt > Minister of Worship and Music > United Church of Hyde Park, Chicago   Thanks! I'll add it to the list (I have the score around here somewhere).     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: priere From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 20:57:30 -0600   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, January 19, 2004 8:46 PM Subject: Re: priere     > Hi! > There is a beautiful little piece entitled "Priere" by Rene Vierne, > Louis' brother. It has very easy piece with few pedal indications, but = it > is gorgeous. The only place I know it is published is in a collection of > French Organ Pieces edited by Alexander Schriner   I cannot resist enlightening you on a piece of trivia. Rene Vierne was unfortunately killed in World War I. Jehan Alain was unfortunately killed in World War II. Under French law, copyright on works written by = composers killed fighting for the homeland is double that for ordinary people. Thus 50 years after death for most people, by 100 years after death for Rene = and Jehan.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Star Spangled Banner From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 22:18:37 EST   Koussevitsky may have conducted; Stravinsky composed the arrangement and = may have conducted himself. Supposedly, it got Stravinsky arrested. BH    
(back) Subject: Re: Star Spangled Banner From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 22:27:13 -0500   on 1/19/04 10:18 PM, DERREINETOR@aol.com at DERREINETOR@aol.com wrote:   Koussevitsky may have conducted; Stravinsky composed the arrangement and = may have conducted himself. Supposedly, it got Stravinsky arrested. BH   There is a fascinating story in this. Trolling the web, I found the following:   It is a familiar fact of Stravinsky's biography that his arrangement of the American national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner," was pulled from the music stands of = the Boston Symphony Orchestra by the local police. The arrangement, written as a tribute by the immigrant composer, violated a statute that permits reinstrumentation of the piece, but forbids reharmonization.     Gives new meaning to the phrase "banned in Boston" (not to mention "the copyright police").     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu        
(back) Subject: Re: Star Spangled Banner From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 22:38:36 -0500   I wonder;   Perhaps the piece should have been called   "The Bar Strangled Banner"   - ducking for cover, fast!   Bob Conway     At 10:27 PM 1/19/2004, you wrote: >on 1/19/04 10:18 PM, DERREINETOR@aol.com at DERREINETOR@aol.com wrote: > >Koussevitsky may have conducted; Stravinsky composed the arrangement and >may have conducted himself. Supposedly, it got Stravinsky arrested. >BH > > >There is a fascinating story in this. Trolling the web, I found the >following: > >It is a familiar fact >of Stravinsky's biography that his arrangement of the American national >anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner," was pulled from the music stands of = the >Boston Symphony Orchestra by the local police. The arrangement, written = as >a tribute by the immigrant composer, violated a statute that permits >reinstrumentation of the piece, but forbids reharmonization. > > >Gives new meaning to the phrase "banned in Boston" (not to mention "the >copyright police"). > > >Randy Runyon >Music Director >Zion Lutheran Church >Hamilton, Ohio >runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Stravinsky's Star Spangled Banner From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 22:40:56 -0500   Sorry for the lack of organ content, but the story's too good to ignore. (And besides, perhaps Stravinsky's arrangement would sound better on the organ than Virgil Fox's.).   From the following source, it would appear that S. was not arrested after all:   After becoming an American citizen, Stravinsky wished to express his gratitude with a new harmonization of The Star-Spangled Banner. But after the first performance of the embellished anthem with the Boston Symphony Orchestra in January 1944, there was a complaint to the Boston police. On the second concert, a squad of twelve policemen were among the audience ready to arrest Stravinsky in case of any infringement on the statutory harmonies. The captain remarked: "Let him change it just once, and we'll grab him." Fortunately Stravinsky was forewarned, and when he launched = into The Star-Spangled Banner, the harmonies were all serene. The police did = not stay to hear the rest of the program. (N. Slonimsky, Slonimsky's Book of Musical Anecdotes, Allen, Towne, & = Heath, Inc., 1948)   What's utterly amazing to me is that a Boston policeman could tell a = change in harmony if he heard it.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu        
(back) Subject: This Saturday - Dennis James - Santa Barbara - Arlington Theatre From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 23:03:16 EST   This Saturday - Dennis James - Santa Barbara - Arlington Theatre   The first theatre organ program of the new year at the atmospheric = Arlington Theatre in downtown Santa Barbara, California will be on this Saturday, January 24. It will be a feature the feature length silent film "The Black = Pirate" starring Douglas Fairbanks plus a comedy short "The Boat" starring Buster Keaton. Silent Film Concerts touring organist Dennis James will provide = the musical accompaniment at the magnificent four manual Robert-Morton theatre = organ.   Douglas Fairbanks: THE BLACK PIRATE 1926 95 minutes - 2-Strip Technicolor =   Print - an exhilarating, lighthearted swashbuckler- a tale of adventure on = the high seas with pirates, treasure chests, and sailing ships on the bounding =   main. "Filmed in a soft, golden early Technicolor process," says The New = Yorker. Billie Dove is the beautiful leading lady, Sam de Grasse is the sour, = sneering villain, and Donald Crisp plays an aged goodhearted pirate who scratches himself."   Arlington Theatre (Center for the Performing Arts, Inc.) is at 1317 State Street in downtown Santa Barbara. Box Office Telephone contact via = 805-963-4408 Concert time is 11 AM and the tickets are $11, available at Ticketmaster = and the Arlington Box Office. Children 14 and under and students with student = I. D. cards, admitted free.   The Robert-Morton organ company of Van Nuys, CA, made over 6000 theatre organs before they went out of business in 1931. The Great Theatre Pipe = Organ of the Arlington was originally installed in Loews Jersey City and was 24 = ranks. There were four of the so-called "Wonder" Morton's built and originally installed in the following Loews Theatres: Valencia (Queens), Kings = (Brooklyn), Paradise (Bronx), 175th (Manhattan). The Santa Barbara installation now = has 27 ranks (about 2000 pipes) plus seven tuned percussions (marimba, = glockenspiel, xylophone, chrysoglott, vibraphone, piano, and chimes) as well as the = usual drums, bells, horns, horse hoofs, surf, wind, wood block and other special = effect sounds.   Some audience comments from a radio documentary produced at Dennis most recent silent film performances at the Arlington:   "He just brings the film to life. I mean everything that happens in the = film is reflected in the sound, so, we love it."   "He's fantastic, we almost forgot he was an organist- he's so natural at = what he's doing that it sounds like a sound track, so then you remind yourself that somebody's doing that spontaneously which is amazing."   "What I like is he has a lot of information, his enthusiasm, and he's = really informative, you know, he rally gives you an opportunity to hear all the instruments ahead of time, and he gives you the background of the music, = and I really appreciate it, because I am unaware of the history, and I feel like = when I come here, I'm getting a history lesson."   Listing sent from: Silent Film Concerts 7095 Hollywood Boulevard, #483 Hollywood, CA 90028-8903 USA Phone: 323-883-1514 E-mail: muscur@aol.com   To be removed from this mailing list, please respond with request to muscur@aol.com    
(back) Subject: This Saturday - Dennis James - Santa Barbara - Arlington Theatre From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 23:05:23 EST   This Saturday - Dennis James - Santa Barbara - Arlington Theatre   The first theatre organ program of the new year at the atmospheric = Arlington Theatre in downtown Santa Barbara, California will be on this Saturday, January 24. It will be a feature the feature length silent film "The Black = Pirate" starring Douglas Fairbanks plus a comedy short "The Boat" starring Buster Keaton. Silent Film Concerts touring organist Dennis James will provide = the musical accompaniment at the magnificent four manual Robert-Morton theatre = organ.   Douglas Fairbanks: THE BLACK PIRATE 1926 95 minutes - 2-Strip Technicolor =   Print - an exhilarating, lighthearted swashbuckler- a tale of adventure on = the high seas with pirates, treasure chests, and sailing ships on the bounding =   main. "Filmed in a soft, golden early Technicolor process," says The New = Yorker. Billie Dove is the beautiful leading lady, Sam de Grasse is the sour, = sneering villain, and Donald Crisp plays an aged goodhearted pirate who scratches himself."   Arlington Theatre (Center for the Performing Arts, Inc.) is at 1317 State Street in downtown Santa Barbara. Box Office Telephone contact via = 805-963-4408 Concert time is 11 AM and the tickets are $11, available at Ticketmaster = and the Arlington Box Office. Children 14 and under and students with student = I. D. cards, admitted free.   The Robert-Morton organ company of Van Nuys, CA, made over 6000 theatre organs before they went out of business in 1931. The Great Theatre Pipe = Organ of the Arlington was originally installed in Loews Jersey City and was 24 = ranks. There were four of the so-called "Wonder" Morton's built and originally installed in the following Loews Theatres: Valencia (Queens), Kings = (Brooklyn), Paradise (Bronx), 175th (Manhattan). The Santa Barbara installation now = has 27 ranks (about 2000 pipes) plus seven tuned percussions (marimba, = glockenspiel, xylophone, chrysoglott, vibraphone, piano, and chimes) as well as the = usual drums, bells, horns, horse hoofs, surf, wind, wood block and other special = effect sounds.   Some audience comments from a radio documentary produced at Dennis most recent silent film performances at the Arlington:   "He just brings the film to life. I mean everything that happens in the = film is reflected in the sound, so, we love it."   "He's fantastic, we almost forgot he was an organist- he's so natural at = what he's doing that it sounds like a sound track, so then you remind yourself that somebody's doing that spontaneously which is amazing."   "What I like is he has a lot of information, his enthusiasm, and he's = really informative, you know, he really gives you an opportunity to hear all the instruments ahead of time, and he gives you the background of the music, = and I really appreciate it, because I am unaware of the history, and I feel like = when I come here, I'm getting a history lesson."   Listing sent from: Silent Film Concerts 7095 Hollywood Boulevard, #483 Hollywood, CA 90028-8903 USA Phone: 323-883-1514 E-mail: muscur@aol.com   To be removed from this mailing list, please respond with request to muscur@aol.com    
(back) Subject: "Live and Learn." From: "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 20:09:15 -0800   =3D=3D->> "Live and Learn." <<-=3D=3D   =3D-> Same for all of us, Charlie. You should be different? <-=3D       Well, it -was- a bit of an ego-smasher. I thought I knew it all already. ;P   ~ C      
(back) Subject: Re: Star Spangled Banner From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 23:57:18 EST   The Boston Police tipped off, I can imagine, by the now (mercifully) = defunct "watch and ward society". All of whom, to a man and a woman, were seated priggishly in their rented boxes at Symphony Hall on the appointed = evening. BH