PipeChat Digest #4605 - Friday, July 9, 2004
 
HELP! Learning High Church musicianship (Anglo-Cath, Epis)
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
The Great and The Good
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
RE: The Great and The Good
  by "Mark Turnbull" <mark.turnbull@bbc.co.uk>
The Farmer in the Dell
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: DENNIS JAMES - THREE CASTRO THEATRE PERFORMANCES this weekend
  by <Victorgan@aol.com>
Postludes and the last hymn.
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Amazing Grace
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Preludes, Postludes and Chatter
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Re: preludes, postludes, and chatter
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
high church musicians and tongues
  by "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com>
Phoenix convention
  by "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com>
Re: Re: preludes, postludes, and chatter
  by "Scott" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Re: The Farmer in the Dell
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: The Farmer in the Dell
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: The Farmer in the Dell
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: high church musicians and tongues
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: high church musicians and tongues, Cont.
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: high church musicians and tongues
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Bill H's "Caveat"
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Hammond 3-manual drawknob?
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
Re: Hammond 3-manual drawknob?
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
new 3m  Hammond drawknob model
  by "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Amazing Grace
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Studdert Kennedy
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Toccatas list is growing . . .
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Amazing Grace
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: HELP! Learning High Church musicianship (Anglo-Cath, Epis) From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 07:28:36 -0400   It was asked:   "anyone else who can point me where to learn how to be a damned good high-church musician."   May I respectfully and humbly suggest that learning to tame the tongue = might be a good place to start when considering any kind of ministry. Otherwise one is just a technically qualified warm body simply filling a position. Read James 3:3-12 to catch my drift.   Keith      
(back) Subject: The Great and The Good From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 12:29:49 +0100   I see (says he, pouring over the Worcester Diocesan News, which has just = arrived together with the village newsletter) that we are to be = entertained this month, in our Diocese, by no less a-person(s) than ...   Carlo Curley .. at Pershore Abbey (Aug 17th, 7:30pm)   and ...   Thomas Heywood .. at St. Martin's, Worcester (31st Aug, 7:30pm)   Now, it is not for me to say that either of these two distinguished = gentlemen is 'The Great' and that the other is 'The Good'. No. Not for me to say, at all; ever; really; honestly.   Well, if you were to ask, nicely ......   Harry Grove [a.k.a. musicman]   Still, 'The Great and The Good' is a whole lot better than 'The Good, = The Bad and The Ugly' And NO, I'm NOT being drawn into THAT argument.
(back) Subject: RE: The Great and The Good From: "Mark Turnbull" <mark.turnbull@bbc.co.uk> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 12:35:27 +0100   what is the organ like at saint martins in worcester now harry? who is thomas heywood, and, is trevor tipple still the organist there? =20 mark turnbull middlesbrough england =20 only a stones throw from durham, james lancelotts new recording of parry complete music is fab on that organ. =20 =20   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Harry Grove Sent: 09 July 2004 12:30 To: PipeChat Subject: The Great and The Good =09 =09 I see (says he, pouring over the Worcester Diocesan News, which has just arrived together with the village newsletter) that we are to be entertained this month, in our Diocese, by no less a-person(s) than ... =09 Carlo Curley .. at Pershore Abbey (Aug 17th, 7:30pm) =20 and ... =20 Thomas Heywood .. at St. Martin's, Worcester (31st Aug, 7:30pm) =20 Now, it is not for me to say that either of these two distinguished gentlemen is 'The Great' and that the other is 'The Good'. No. Not for me to say, at all; ever; really; honestly. =20 Well, if you were to ask, nicely ...... =20 Harry Grove [a.k.a. musicman] =20 Still, 'The Great and The Good' is a whole lot better than 'The Good, The Bad and The Ugly' And NO, I'm NOT being drawn into THAT argument.     http://www.bbc.co.uk/ - World Wide Wonderland   This e-mail (and any attachments) is confidential and may contain personal views which are not the views of the BBC unless specifically stated. If you have received it in error, please delete it from your system.=20 Do not use, copy or disclose the information in any way nor act in reliance on it and notify the sender immediately. Please note that the BBC monitors e-mails sent or received.=20 Further communication will signify your consent to this.  
(back) Subject: The Farmer in the Dell From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2004 07:49:00 -0400   on 7/8/04 6:03 PM, Alicia Zeilenga at azeilenga@theatreorgans.com wrote:     > She had been a writer of Christian books and articles, even though she > said that she had lost her faith when she was younger than I am. If one > read her books, one would have thought she was a convinced Christian.     This is a most interesting story. But rather than concluding that God can work through anyone He chooses, could not one just as reasonably conclude that what we think is God's work is sometimes just a lot of hooey? A lot = of what passes for devotion is just knowing how to speak the language of the faithful. One can pass for a native speaker of that language without = being one of the faithful, as your story shows. Your neighbor, as a = professional writer, knew how to talk the talk. What she wrote in that genre was the literary equivalent of playing "The Farmer in the Dell" for an organ offertory, and she knew it.   I am very impressed, by the way, with David Evangelides's command of scripture. That Phil 1:16-18 passage is right on the mark in this discussion!   His discussion of the tune is most interesting, and reminds me that many hymns in 3/4 time sound, uncomfortably to my ears, like waltzes!   The farmer in the dell The farmer in the dell Hi-ho,The derry-o We're going all to hell. ;-)     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: DENNIS JAMES - THREE CASTRO THEATRE PERFORMANCES this weekend From: <Victorgan@aol.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 07:51:37 EDT   Hey Dennis!   Good to hear from you - the program sounds wonderful and I wish I could be =   there to hear it.   Take care, my friend!   Vic  
(back) Subject: Postludes and the last hymn. From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 20:31:52 +0800   I noticed a comment in a post that the Catholic congregations in the USA sing the last hymn after the final blessing and the Amen before the = organist launches into the Postlude. The procession goes out during the hymn. The same procedure is used in the Catholic Church where I play frequently. The comment was also made as to how to get the congregation to sing all of the final hymn. You can't!! The congregation here gets through the first two verses, by which time the procession has gone through the sacristy door. They then close the hymn book and make for the door! Maybe three or four stay to listen to the postlude. Bob Elms.    
(back) Subject: Re: Amazing Grace From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2004 08:38:22 -0400   on 7/8/04 5:20 PM, TheShieling at TheShieling@xtra.co.nz wrote:   > > Yes, exactly. If we were to worry about the quality of life of the = writer of > a hymn, we'd probably have to exclude a great many fine hymns, and also > exclude many organists and composers if we were to worry about who wrote = the > tune. > > Just as St Paul was converted on the Damascus Road and became a man = worthy > of his calling, so I believe was John Newton. As Rector of St Mary's > Woolnoth in London he was one of the most dearly-loved CofE priests in = the > whole of England, for many years. > > Ross > >   Gee, it's frustrating to be misunderstood. What I said in an earlier post (July 6) was not that I was worried about the quality of life of the = writer of Amazing Grace, but with the hymn itself. "My problem," I wrote, "is = with the theology behind Newton's hymn, which permits one to continue sinning (e.g., trading in slaves) with a clean conscience because one is under the mistaken impression that one is 'saved' and thus free from sin." Newton became the beloved London rector _after_ he renounced his slave-trading = sin, but he wrote the hymn _before_ doing so. But even that is not as = important as the content of the hymn itself, which as David Evangelides points out = is wholly consistent with the doctrine of grace. The problem I see is with a doctrine of grace that allows one to continue to trade in slaves. What = good does such a doctrine do other than the dubious one of making people = believe that they're saved? It didn't do much for the slaves. Faith without works is dead. A comfort that blinds one to one's own sin is pernicious. In = the words of another beloved British cleric, G. A. Studdert Kennedy, "We have taught our people to use prayer too much as a means of comfort -- not in = the original and heroic sense of uplifting, inspiring, strengthening, but in = the more modern and baser sense of soothing sorrow, dulling pain, and drying tears -- the comfort of the cushion, not the comfort of the Cross."     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Preludes, Postludes and Chatter From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 08:55:00 -0400   Jeff, responding to Shirley, said   "Curious...we must be the only ones doing this differently. Our services conclude as follows: Post Communion Prayer Benediction Dismissal (Go in peace...) Recessional Hymn Postlude. Is this unusual? I keep hearing that in a lot of places, the Dismissal is between the final hymn and postlude."   > A professor of mine once said that the Postlude should send the congregation out > joyfully. At the end of our ELCA Lutheran services, the presider proclaims, "Go in > peace. Serve the Lord." To which the congregation responds, "Thanks be = to > God." The postlude that follows, then, should propel ppl out the door = to Serve the > Lord. Maybe the Benedictions that precede the postlude in liturgies = other than the > Lutheran ones should be a combination of blessing AND sending. > > -Shirley   My ELCAs have dealt with this issue by adding to the printed liturgy an extra, very short prayer between the recessional hymn and postlude. The pastor pronounces it from the back of the sanctuary. I'm new so I wasn't around to learn the genesis of the idea.   The only congregant who consistently listens to my postlude is the retired musicology professor who was instrumental in getting me hired. This pretty much ensures that I choose it thoughtfully and learn it to at least a = modest standard of proficiency <g>.    
(back) Subject: Re: preludes, postludes, and chatter From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 09:00:40 EDT   Not being in a Liturgical church (for now) the order of service is:   Prelude (15 minutes before the Services begins) Call to Worship: Choir "Sing Make a Joyful Sound" Hymn: "To God Be the Glory" (We sing every verse of the hymns) Opportunities for the week Welcome to Highland: Singing "I Love You With the Love of the Lord" the congregation stands and shakes hands with the visitors who stay seated Children's Message Song: "When I look Into Your Holiness" Hymn: "Great Is the Lord" Hymn: "Praise To The Lord, The Almighty" Scripture Reading Hymn: "There Is A Redeemer" Hymn: "Because He Lives" Hymn: "It Is Well With My Soul" Offertory (The pianist and I alternate Sundays) Message in song: Probably Music Director with CD accompaniment, as I do = not have the music. He sends it via email if he wants me to accompany him. Message Hymn of Response: "Take My Life, and Le It Be" Sharing Decisions Song of Fellowship: Bless Be The Tie (Everyone takes the hand of the ones nearest them.) Postlude   The songs and hymns are accompanied by the piano and organ. Most of the singers use CD. The Music Director (who is part time and works at 2 other = jobs) sometimes uses a CD for the choir. Sometimes I will play a Chorale Prelude on the first Hymn, if it is sung immediately after the choir comes in. It makes a good introduction. Lee (Eyrline Morgan, Organist, Highland Baptist, Denton, TX)    
(back) Subject: high church musicians and tongues From: "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 06:25:01 -0700 (PDT)   A minister once began a sermon: I will preach a sermon today based on = three points. The first point is that there are people around you dying = every day and going to hell. The second point is that many of you in this = audience don't give a damn about it. The third point is that you are more = concerned that I said "damn" from the pulpit than the fact that you are = not offering the gospel to those around you who need it. This story is slightly modified from the original that I read in Reader's = Digest many years ago. The substance is the same. I have known a number of very fine high church musicians in my life whose = tongues are not entirely pure. You can be assured, however, that many of = them are far closer to heaven than I will ever be. FWIW Richard Hazelip  
(back) Subject: Phoenix convention From: "Richard Hazelip" <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 06:29:47 -0700 (PDT)   Is anyone on this list going to the NPM convention held in Phoenix the = first week of August? Richard  
(back) Subject: Re: Re: preludes, postludes, and chatter From: "Scott" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 09:13:29 -0500   My congregation sings every verse that I play for them. I usually do 1-2 harmonization's too, so they get the feeling that they have to wait to = hear a different style of verse before they can leave. My Catholics really do sing, and they stay for postludes too.   I played the reger fugue on "god save the king" and was amazed that over half of the congregation was waiting and applauded after that postlude.   Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St. Champaign, IL 61820 217.390.0158 www.scottmontgomerymusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: The Farmer in the Dell From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 09:37:05 -0500   Gee, the tune I remember from childhood for The Farmer in the Dell is in duple metre. I've most recently heard it in Dell commercials. How does = your tune go?   Robert Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, July 09, 2004 6:49 AM Subject: The Farmer in the Dell     > His discussion of the tune is most interesting, and reminds me that many > hymns in 3/4 time sound, uncomfortably to my ears, like waltzes! > > The farmer in the dell > The farmer in the dell > Hi-ho,The derry-o > We're going all to hell. ;-) > > Randy Runyon      
(back) Subject: Re: The Farmer in the Dell From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2004 09:41:52 -0500   I thought it was in 6/8.... Margo   Robert Lind wrote: > Gee, the tune I remember from childhood for The Farmer in the Dell is in > duple metre. I've most recently heard it in Dell commercials. How does = your > tune go? > > Robert Lind > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Friday, July 09, 2004 6:49 AM > Subject: The Farmer in the Dell > > > >>His discussion of the tune is most interesting, and reminds me that many >>hymns in 3/4 time sound, uncomfortably to my ears, like waltzes! >> >>The farmer in the dell >>The farmer in the dell >>Hi-ho,The derry-o >>We're going all to hell. ;-) >> >>Randy Runyon > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: The Farmer in the Dell From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2004 10:53:33 -0400   The proximity of my version of the Farmer in the Dell to my remark about = 3/4 time hymns was unintentionally misleading. I didn't mean to say it was in 3/4 time!     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu       on 7/9/04 10:41 AM, Margo Dillard at dillardm@airmail.net wrote:   > I thought it was in 6/8.... > Margo > > Robert Lind wrote: >> Gee, the tune I remember from childhood for The Farmer in the Dell is = in >> duple metre. I've most recently heard it in Dell commercials. How does = your >> tune go? >> >    
(back) Subject: Re: high church musicians and tongues From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 14:53:54 EDT   Keith, et al.,   I refuse to take you to task for being sensitive to impious speech. I = condemn cussing and blasphemy in general, though I'm occasionally guilty of it. = OK, more than occasionally. There are times when my language becomes = positively "Cheneyesque", if you catch my drift. Of course, I don't have the luxury = of the "700 Club" sticking up for me if I told a Vestryman to perform an = anatomical impossiblility on himself.   A certain ancient Ecumenical Council of the Church decided that ministries =   (especially where the Sacraments are concerned) are not dependent upon the =   personal piety of the minister, but on the intent of those being = ministered to (or, specifically, those receiving a sacrament). There are many high churchmen (some musicians, some priests, some laymen) who have made a great = contribution to the Church without being particulary pious personally. The great Healy Willan, who once said that he was "Scotch by infusion" (or something = similar) is a worthy example.   I'm not likely to cuss in my posts to this list, though I'm also not = likely to give up trading mildly ribald anecdotes with my choristers, when "appropriate" (read "appropriate" in terms of SECULAR regulations on = harassment). It    
(back) Subject: Re: high church musicians and tongues, Cont. From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 14:59:10 EDT   It would be less than honest (and human) of me.   With tongue firmly planted in cheek,   Pax, Bill H.  
(back) Subject: Re: high church musicians and tongues From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 15:42:07 EDT   Keith, et al.,   I refuse to take you to task for being sensitive to impious speech. I = condemn cussing and blasphemy in general, though I am occasionally guilty of it myself. OK, more than occasionally. There are times when my language = becomes positively "Cheneyesque", if you catch my drift. Of course, I don't have = the luxury of the "700 Club" sticking up for me if I told a Vestryman to perform an anatomical impossibility on himself.   A certain ancient Ecumenical Council of the Church decided that ministries =   (especially where the Sacraments are concerned) are not dependent upon the =   personal piety of the minister, but rather on the intent of those being = ministered to. There are many high churchmen (some musicians, some priests, some = laymen) who have made a great contribution to the Church without being = particularly personally pious. The great Healy Willan, who once said that he was = "Scotch by infusion" (or something similar),is a worthy example.   I'm not likely to cuss in my posts to the list, though I'm also likely to = do it other places, including in staff meetings and the choir loft. It would = be less than honest (or human) of me to do otherwise.   With tongue in cheek (but only half-joking), Bill H. Boston.  
(back) Subject: Bill H's "Caveat" From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 15:55:56 EDT   List, I really don't cuss in the loft, of course, but occasionally in a meeting where there is "a candid exchange of opinions" (that's an old SOVIET media =   euphemism for a heated debate).   Of course I try not take the Lord's name in vain. I know how he feels, as I've had mine taken in vain more than once!   Cheers, Bill H.  
(back) Subject: Hammond 3-manual drawknob? From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2004 16:18:43 -0400   Hey Bud -   Is this what you played at the Shrine to Father Scarlet?   http://www.hammondorganco.com/product_set2.htm   Wonder how the thing sounds.....   --Shirley    
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond 3-manual drawknob? From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 04:56:23 +0800     Hammond/Suzuki's Classic Organs are made by Content (elpro, in Holland) = ... I believe this one is identical to the Content D6800. Don't know how they sound live, but the MP3 Demos on content's web site = sound just fine. http://www.content-organs.com <-- with a goofy maximizing and spawning of = a second window with no forward/back/print &c. controls.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2004 16:18:43 -0400 To: pipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Hammond 3-manual drawknob?   > Hey Bud - > > Is this what you played at the Shrine to Father Scarlet? > > http://www.hammondorganco.com/product_set2.htm > > Wonder how the thing sounds..... > > --Shirley   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   -- ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm      
(back) Subject: new 3m Hammond drawknob model From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2004 14:29:41 -0700   If it sounds anything like the 3m rocker-tab, it sounds like a first-generation Johannus from 20 years ago or more, or an even earlier first-generation Allen digital ... harsh, sterile, VERY electronic, and VERY quasi-baroque sounding.   I presume Hammond-Suzuki owns the original Hammond tonewheeler patents .... why on earth don't they simply bring the TONEWHEELER B-3 back into production? They're simple to make, and that's what people WANT. The digitally sampled XB-3 is NOT the same as a tonewheeler, trust me (grin), and REAL Hammond players are having NONE of them.   Vintage B-3s in good condition cost more NOW than they did NEW, at least in some parts of the country, particularly with a TUBE Leslie included.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: RE: Amazing Grace From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 09:34:45 +1200   >In the words of another beloved British cleric, G. A. Studdert Kennedy,   This has been something of a non-musical thread, perhaps, straying into theology, so I'll add just one thing - yes, Woodbine Willie (Studdert Kennedy) was beloved, and I treasure his books, still. His little poem, = "The Psychologist" influenced me way back when for many years I was a clinical psychologist, before ordination training.   Ross   --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.717 / Virus Database: 473 - Release Date: 8/07/2004    
(back) Subject: Studdert Kennedy From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2004 17:56:10 -0400   I'm so happy to find another Woodbine Willie enthusiast! Happily, the = poems in the collection "The Unutterable Beauty" are available on line at http://www.mun.ca/rels/restmov/texts/dasc/TUB.HTM as well as a book of his sermons at http://www.mun.ca/rels/restmov/texts/dasc/IBSAC.HTM. Enthused = by his poems, I've set three of them to music as vocal solos: "The = Unutterable Beauty," "The Judge," and "Indifference." My baritone soloist sang "Indifference" on Ash Wednesday this year, and it was quite moving.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu         on 7/9/04 5:34 PM, TheShieling at TheShieling@xtra.co.nz wrote:   >> In the words of another beloved British cleric, G. A. Studdert Kennedy, > > This has been something of a non-musical thread, perhaps, straying into > theology, so I'll add just one thing - yes, Woodbine Willie (Studdert > Kennedy) was beloved, and I treasure his books, still. His little poem, = "The > Psychologist" influenced me way back when for many years I was a = clinical > psychologist, before ordination training. > > Ross >    
(back) Subject: Toccatas list is growing . . . From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 18:44:38 EDT   Many thanks to _OrganistBrent@aol.com_ (mailto:OrganistBrent@aol.com) ! His Internet Broadcast _www.ORGANlive365_ (http://www.ORGANlive365) is presenting "Toccata sur un theme gregorienne" by Edward Shippen Barnes = - from a Pro Organo CD (May, 2002) performed, with considerable energy and = precision by organist Simon Nieminski. The CD is titled Organ Symphonies of Edward Shippen Barnes. Bravo - another Toccata to add to our growing list! Dale Rider Inidependence, MO      
(back) Subject: Re: Amazing Grace From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2004 18:47:44 -0400   On 7/9/04 5:34 PM, "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   > This has been something of a non-musical thread, perhaps, straying into > theology   Well, as y'all know, that doesn't bother me, though I'm sure it's gratuitou= s to some. But I use your line as an excuse to recommend a booklet.   "The Theological Character of Music in Worship" by Robin A. Leaver. Less than 20 pages of actual body text, but dozens of footnotes (they always tur= n me on). =20   Concordia Publishing House. If it's your kind of thing, you'll know how to order. Www.cph.org or something like that.   This is one of a series of things edited by Carl Schalk; that's enough of a recommendation.   Desir=E9e: I think it=B9s a pre-primer for the studying you=B9re wanting to do. If you disagree, give it up. Real high church organist (whatever denomination) is not a stroll in the park. And =B3phony=B2 doesn=B9t make it. It=B9s not =B3an act.=B2 Plan on three or four decades. Then semester break, and do it again. =20   Alan