PipeChat Digest #4616 - Wednesday, July 14, 2004
 
Re: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Repertoire Question
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
"Catholic" organ specs
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Re: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
RE: "Catholic" organ specs
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: "Catholic" organ specs
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
RE: "Catholic" organ specs
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
RE: "Catholic" organ specs
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: 32-footers in small spaces?
  by "Steve Chandler" <stevec@open-tech.com>
Re: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design
  by <RVScara@aol.com>
RE: "Catholic" organ specs
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
RE: on digital organs
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
RE: "Catholic" organ specs
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Dick Liebert Music
  by "Chip Bowden" <chip_bowden@emoryhealthcare.org>
Re: "Catholic" organ specs
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 15:29:36 -0400   On 7/14/04 2:26 PM, "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> wrote:   > Having gone to PLU for 2 years, theres a melding of ECUSA and ELCA hymn > playing: Gathering notes between verses in large rooms, lots of swell for= the > next to the last verse with the full battery. >=20 > =A7=A7=A7 Maybe in the Midwest, but not (to my notice) here in NYC. Surely th= e > prime denominations (here) for music production are the ECUSA and the ELC= A; > and both do well. But I see little if any cross-fertilization. And I=B9m > familiar with the leading Lutheran organists in Manhattan (Rick Erickson = at > Holy Trinity and Tom Schmidt at St. Peter=B9s). I think their style is =B3cl= ean > break=B2 between stanzas (well, unless there=B9s an interlude or something); = and > to swell UP to the final stanza sounds hokey for us. Break it off; enhan= ce > registration, and GO! > =20 > My thing...from the list...I just hear so many people with this "Liturgic= al > use" 8 4 2 IV only commentude that the very basic sounds are needed for > joyful, heartfelt, spirited and uplifted hymn singing. >=20 > =A7=A7=A7 I don=B9t think I understand. I dig 8 4 2 IV, but not =B3commentude.=B2 = But > our registrations are a lot more varied than THAT! >=20 > So, im just wondering...what do these people in the esteemed positions or > not-so-esteemed positions do. And the art of hymn playing is just somethi= ng > that i am interested in. >=20 > =A7=A7=A7 Most important part of the job, if you=B9re a Lutheran. > =20 > I know that in the Southeast, big robust hymn playing is the norm. >=20 > =A7=A7=A7 THAT I can easily believe. But that=B9s possibly the least =B3Lutheran= =B2 > part of the country, so can=B9t comment. (I=B9m going to ask a friend in a l= arge > parish in Atlanta; I=B9ll let you know.) >=20 > Alan >=20    
(back) Subject: Repertoire Question From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 15:38:00 EDT   If anyone has the following music, please write to me OFF LIST with the = name of the publisher and publication code number. Many thanks! _Seth Bingham 1882-1972 - Sarabande (Baroque Suite) _ (http://www.live365.com/pls/front?handler=3Dplaylist&cmd=3Dview&handle=3Dwi= ndpipe&site=3D..#bottom) Dale G. Rider Independence, MO  
(back) Subject: Re: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 15:55:37 EDT   >I know that in the Southeast, big robust hymn playing is the norm. At least at the churches where I've served, and currently serve, big = robust hymn playing is necessary, due to the fact that large congregations are = the norm and that they are large SINGING congregations. However, I've been = to churches where 8' and 4' was way too overpowering for the final verse of = a hymn. I don't know that there is a particular style anywhere that is the = "norm," it really depends on each individual congregation. I know Catholic = churches that sing, and Episcopal churches that don't. I know Baptist churches = that barely make a peep and some Lutherans that can sing the roof off of a convention center. On the other hand, I know some Catholic churches who = all just stand there and let the cantor sing a solo on every hymn and Baptist = churches who will put any Lutheran church to shame. It all depends on each local church's musical tradition and also on the musicians that are there. I = have Catholic relatives in CT who have a very nice organist who doesn't have a = lot of organ training, but is a good pianist. Her problem is registration. She = comes up with some registrations that are very hard to sing with--very little foundation, reeds, a mixture or three, mutations, celestes, and 8' stops = in the pedal. When I go to visit them, and I play for the masses, I register = the organ completely differently, and the congregation suddenly starts to = sing, because there is some support underneath them. There are lots of = variables in what makes a congregation want to sing or not sing. I would guess that a New York style hymn is just very grand, in = high-church style, lots of foundations, full swell with reeds and mixtures, boxes shut = (caged rage), opening and closing at appropriate times to give shading and = color to the text as necessary, tuba solos in the tenor octave and some full foundations with 32's (lots of lumber) purring away in the pedal. You know, the "old style" playing of the 30's and 40's that seems to be = lost for the most part, except in the Anglo Catholic tradition. I don't know, just my thoughts.... Monty Bennett Friendship Baptist Church Charlotte, NC  
(back) Subject: "Catholic" organ specs From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 14:05:28 -0700   As one who has been functioning in Roman parishes after working in both Episcopal & Lutheran circles for many years, I am confounded as to why we are still thinking in denominational terms. It really comes down to the breadth of the music used in a parish, whether "high church Baptist" or "low church Roman".   If the parish uses a variety of liturgical music, that is what will influence the stoplist of the organ. If the organ is designed well to function liturgically, it will be able to play literature - maybe not everything from Sweelinck to Messiaen, but it will handle lots of stuff. The crux of the matter is will the ego of the current organist get in the way of a thoughtfully designed instrument. I see that happen time and again, and as one who may be responsible for shepherding in a new organ, I have to keep myself in check.   One sound I've found invaluable in leading a liturgy is a cornet that sings out, but is not overbearing. There are many times I've used a cornet combo to solo out a melody when "introducing" a hymn/song, and then for congregational singing. It carries better than a softer reed, and is more appropriate than a large reed. Also, the character of the sound can be altered by adding a reed, or subtracting a stop like the 2', etc.. I've used this sound sccessfully for both large and small congregations/assemblies.   To accompany a cornet sound for leading singing, it helps to have an 8' principal that is beautiful in it's own right. Without the principal, there is not enough weight to the accompaniment to support singing.   It's so sad that many organists have not experienced playing a beautiful and well designed smaller instrument. (Smaller does not mean weaker.) It would very likely cause many to rethink their approach to what a church organ should be. Despite the many fine builders we have to choose from, the "bigger is necessary" approach is quite alive, hence the desire for large electronic instruments to fulfill the fantasy...sigh.    
(back) Subject: Re: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 17:12:08 -0400   From Desiree: My thing...from the list...I just hear so many people with this = "Liturgical use" 8 4 2 IV only commentude that the very basic sounds are needed for joyful, heartfelt, spirited and uplifted hymn singing. So, im just wondering...what do these people in the esteemed positions or not-so-esteemed positions do. And the art of hymn playing is just = something that i am interested in.   Since you asked about "not-so-esteemed" <g>. This is a subject I'm also interested in, although some of our more experienced listers probably have seen it done to death.   In my small ELCA church on my smallish Rodgers I pretty much stick to a basic principal chorus registration, for variety calling on alternate introductions, alternate harmonizations--especially those which also = adjust the melodic line on well-known hymns--and an occasional interlude between verses. My attitude about hymn singing is that by its very nature it's supposed to be simple and repetitive. I'll occasionally crank up the = volume on the last verse with reeds or an extra mixture, but I reserve that to a couple times a month for hymns of the more majestic or solemn type. I = figure if I did it even as often as every week it would become so routine as to lose any impact.   And I just hate it when people cut the registration back to soft for = second or third verses. I always think I can sense the congregation out there thinking "all of a sudden I hear myself singing, and now I'm thinking = about how bad my voice sounds, and I guess I better sing softer, or maybe just = not at all," and it's a safe bet at least some of them have lost the whole = point of what the hymn's about by that time.   All this said, I realize there are vastly different expectations among what's expected and appreciated in various denominations and within congregations within the denominations. In my church clean, tasteful, = simple and slightly understated seems to characterize the desired worship aesthetic. I try to make my hymn playing fit.    
(back) Subject: RE: "Catholic" organ specs From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 22:21:35 +0100   I think that all American organists should be given a free vacation in England, with an organ crawl thrown in. You will find smaller instruments EVERYWHERE in England - we don't have big ones - apart from the odd cathedral or whatever. Mind you, not so many of them are well-designed though! I think that our very biggest instruments would only count as "medium-sized" in the USA...   Will Light Coventry UK     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of terry hicks SNIP   It's so sad that many organists have not experienced playing a beautiful and well designed smaller instrument. (Smaller does not mean weaker.) It would very likely cause many to rethink their approach to what a church organ should be. Despite the many fine builders we have to choose from, the "bigger is necessary" approach is quite alive, hence the desire for large electronic instruments to fulfill the fantasy...sigh.      
(back) Subject: Re: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 17:26:11 -0400   Monty: The competition around this list is not EASY! But your posts are right up there, by any measurement. I think you are "right on" with this whole post. Thank you.   Alan   On 7/14/04 3:55 PM, "RMB10@aol.com" <RMB10@aol.com> wrote:   > snip I know Catholic churches that sing, and Episcopal churches that = don't. > I know Baptist churches that barely make a peep and some Lutherans that = can > sing the roof off of a convention center. On the other hand, I know = some > Catholic churches who all just stand there and let the cantor sing a = solo on > every hymn and Baptist churches who will put any Lutheran church to = shame. > It all depends on each local church's musical tradition and also on the > musicians that are there. I have Catholic relatives in CT who have a = very > nice organist who doesn't have a lot of organ training, but is a good > pianist. . . . When I go to visit them, and I play for the masses, I > register the organ completely differently, and the congregation = suddenly > starts to sing, because there is some support underneath them. There = are > lots of variables in what makes a congregation want to sing or not = sing. > > I would guess that a New York style hymn is just very grand, in = high-church > style, lots of foundations, full swell with reeds and mixtures, boxes = shut > (caged rage), opening and closing at appropriate times to give shading = and > color to the text as necessary, tuba solos in the tenor octave and some = full > foundations with 32's (lots of lumber) purring away in the pedal. You = know, > the "old style" playing of the 30's and 40's that seems to be lost for = the > most part, except in the Anglo Catholic tradition.   And, in an improved version, among the Lutherans, at least in THIS neighborhood! > I don't know, just my thoughts....   And solid ones they are!   Alan      
(back) Subject: RE: "Catholic" organ specs From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 09:36:55 +1200     >I think that all American organists should be given a free vacation in England, with an organ crawl thrown in. You will find smaller instruments EVERYWHERE in England - we don't have big ones - apart from the odd cathedral or whatever. Mind you, not so many of them are well-designed though! I think that our very biggest instruments would only count as "medium-sized" in the USA...   I'm sure Americans would love that to happen. As would this NZer who will = be in the UK in September. :-)   Yes, in the UK and in NZ, instruments are often very much smaller. I = played some fabulous organs in the UK on my 1992 trip, and some were quite small. = I can think of the 3-stop Harrison & Harrison in Lindisfarne's parish = church, of the small Rushworth & Dreaper in Aycliffe Village, of the little organ = in the huge chapel at the Bishop of Durham's official residence, of the organ in St Martin's Ludgate Hill, of the organ in Selborne's parish church.   Here in NZ, we have a few biggish instruments, as I might call them, but nothing really huge, and in most circumstances a 2m of 20rks would be regarded as a big organ.   Ross   --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.719 / Virus Database: 475 - Release Date: 12/07/2004    
(back) Subject: RE: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 22:31:32 +0100   I am amazed by what I hear about hymn-playing in the USA. My impression = is that organists there seem to want to play to some kind of formula. i.e. "Start off with diapason or principal chorus, add the full swell with = box shut on the penultimate verse, then add mixtures and reeds for the last verse."   Surely we should play the WORDS of the hymns. Sometimes I will drop = right down to 8' and 4' flutes for a verse, if the words demand that. Sure, = slap on all the chorus reeds and mixtures and open all the boxes up if the = last verse is a "standard doxology" type of verse, but last Sunday I almost = faded out to nothing on the last verse of one of Charles Wesley's greatest = hymns, because the words say: "and lead them to Thy bleeding side, the sheep = for whom their shepherd died." I would have no sensitivity at all if I = blasted that lot out with the fanfare trumpet and all the Superoctave couplers!   Will Light Coventry UK     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Emily Adams Sent: 14 July 2004 22:12     And I just hate it when people cut the registration back to soft for = second or third verses. I always think I can sense the congregation out there thinking "all of a sudden I hear myself singing, and now I'm thinking = about how bad my voice sounds, and I guess I better sing softer, or maybe just = not at all," and it's a safe bet at least some of them have lost the whole = point of what the hymn's about by that time.   All this said, I realize there are vastly different expectations among what's expected and appreciated in various denominations and within congregations within the denominations. In my church clean, tasteful, = simple and slightly understated seems to characterize the desired worship aesthetic. I try to make my hymn playing fit.        
(back) Subject: RE: "Catholic" organ specs From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 22:41:10 +0100   Yes- I sometimes think I would like to play something bigger and = grander, but our little 2 manual, 20 ranks (24 stops) can do everything I want it = to do for services and cope fairly well with a wide range of organ music. Someone came up to me last Sunday after the service and said "that must = be one of the best organs in the city!" I was dumbfounded, but thinking = about it, apart from the cathedral, which is far and away the best, I think in = my estimation it would rank about number 5 in the city, ahead of several = larger instruments which are in worse states of repair, or which have eccentric specifications.   Will Light Coventry UK     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of TheShieling Sent: 14 July 2004 22:37 To: 'PipeChat' Yes, in the UK and in NZ, instruments are often very much smaller. I = played some fabulous organs in the UK on my 1992 trip, and some were quite = small. I can think of the 3-stop Harrison & Harrison in Lindisfarne's parish = church, of the small Rushworth & Dreaper in Aycliffe Village, of the little = organ in the huge chapel at the Bishop of Durham's official residence, of the = organ in St Martin's Ludgate Hill, of the organ in Selborne's parish church.=20   Here in NZ, we have a few biggish instruments, as I might call them, but nothing really huge, and in most circumstances a 2m of 20rks would be regarded as a big organ.=20   Ross      
(back) Subject: Re: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 16:44:35 -0500   Emily-   Do you still find it annoying when the registration is cut back if the verse is more "tender"? I try to avoid using a bigger registration for the final verse if the verse doesn't suggest it.   Alicia Zeilenga My attitude about hymn singing is that by its very nature it's > supposed to be simple and repetitive. I'll occasionally crank up the > volume > on the last verse with reeds or an extra mixture, but I reserve that to > a > couple times a month for hymns of the more majestic or solemn type. I > figure > if I did it even as often as every week it would become so routine as > to > lose any impact. > > And I just hate it when people cut the registration back to soft for > second > or third verses. I always think I can sense the congregation out there > thinking "all of a sudden I hear myself singing, and now I'm thinking > about > how bad my voice sounds, and I guess I better sing softer, or maybe > just not > at all," and it's a safe bet at least some of them have lost the whole > point > of what the hymn's about by that time. >      
(back) Subject: RE: "Catholic" organ specs From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 09:54:37 +1200     >Someone came up to me last Sunday after the service and said "that must = be one of the best organs in the city!" I was dumbfounded, but thinking about it, apart from the cathedral, which is far and away the best, I think in = my estimation it would rank about number 5 in the city, ahead of several = larger instruments which are in worse states of repair, or which have eccentric specifications.   I played just two organs in Coventry. The Cathedral and Holy Trinity ones. The HT one was large but struck as not being of good tone. The Cathedral = H&H put me off a bit, to be honest - a lot of screech at the top end, and yet boom at the bottom end, with insufficient "tummy". The Southwark Lewis, to me, is a far far finer instrument and H&H did an amazingly good job in restoring the Lewis tone.   Mind you, my day trip to Lichield and Coventry with the Organ Club was hilarious, as a rather drunk fellow aged about 60 insisted on playing = every organ and then ranting and raving about what he termed good tone. He was = an utterly incompetent player, and I watched beside the console at HT = Coventry - full to Tubas, strings, Trems, flutes, great Chorus, all coupled-up and played in thick chords. Yyoicks! What an ugly sound! Other players tried = to make a good sound, but failed dismally as well.   On my upcoming trip, I'll be seeing, or re-seeing, a number of organbuilders. Sadly, Walkers, Rushworths, HN&B - all now gone. I've been trying to find out if Conacher is still going in Hebden Bridge, and also = if Bishops in Beethoven Street in London are still there. Do you know?   Thanks, Ross   --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.719 / Virus Database: 475 - Release Date: 12/07/2004    
(back) Subject: Re: 32-footers in small spaces? From: "Steve Chandler" <stevec@open-tech.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 16:56:15 -0500   > > > >Subject: 32-footers in small spaces? >From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> >Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004 20:14:53 -0700 > >I've heard various people say -- some I trust, and some I >don't! -- that you need x amount of square feet of space to >"do" a 32-footer. > >Well, I've asked this question before and never gotten a >really satisfactory answer so I'll ask it again. > >Why then, on my "killer" home stereo system with a triple >speaker system (2 large cabinets per channel plus 2 sub >woofers), is it that I can hear AND feel not only 32-foot >tone but 64-foot as well? > > > Hi Charlie,   Let me see if I can explain. It's the difference between waves in a bucket and waves in a swimming pool. The waves still exist, but what you get in a bucket is more a pressure gradient whereas in a swimming pool they reflect and thus the sound is more random. When a wave moves in a bucket it's one side up then the other, not exactly random. In a swimming pool you get truly random behavior because the waves reflect around the pool leading to random peaks and waves crisscross each other. What that means in a small room is that the particular frequencies of bass will sound louder in some parts of the room and be nonexistent at other spots. Some furniture can tend to act as a bass trap (couches are good at this) or you can buy bass traps. Bass traps will absorb some bass sound at room modes (walls) and this will tend to diminish standing waves and pressure gradients thus smoothing the overall response in the room. This will actually sound like an increase in bass presence and punch. I hope that helps.   Steve Chandler http://www.audiostreet.net/stevechandler http://www.soundclick.com/stevechandler    
(back) Subject: Re: "New York Style" Hymn playing and organ design From: <RVScara@aol.com> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 18:18:43 EDT   Monty and Will, both "Right On!" After 57 years of RC playing I feel I have to "play to the crowd". If it = is the 60 - 80 staunch regulars who attend everything and sing their hearts = out regardless what it is, I accompany them. If it is the 350 at Sunday = Masses, after the first couple of measures I know whether I can accompany them or =   whether I have to lead them. If the latter, I'll won't hesitate to use = the SW-Gt Solo or CH-Gt Solo pistons with a Trumpet, Cornet, or Tuba as a = crutch to bring them along. But, "common sensitivity" has to come into play...ing. = The words, and placement of the hymn in the service, should certainly be considered in the registration. No Tuba at the Communion Meditation hymn = or Principal + Reed Chorus with Softly and Tenderly...... Will... you are right about the formula bit. I have been asked why the congregation does not sing well when "the other organist" plays. Simply, = style! The other organist uses 8'/4'/2' for everything, the magic formula for = hymn playing, merely dropping the 2' for the Communion hymn, and everything at =   about 1/2 time: rush, rush, catch a breath wherever you can. The people = will sing if you set the tone.  
(back) Subject: RE: "Catholic" organ specs From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 18:21:43 -0400   With all due regard to our American friends,   I think that Will makes a very strong point. Having heard a lot of organs =   over here, both in America and in Canada, it does seem that the preference =   is for size and grandeur. But that is just the way it is over here in = most things, - Bigger is Better!   I have often wondered if E. Power Biggs would have simply been Ernest P. Biggs if he had remained in England!   By the way, Will, which church are you at in Coventry?   Bob Conway   At 05:21 PM 7/14/2004, Will wrote: >I think that all American organists should be given a free vacation in >England, with an organ crawl thrown in. You will find smaller instruments >EVERYWHERE in England - we don't have big ones - apart from the odd >cathedral or whatever. Mind you, not so many of them are well-designed >though! I think that our very biggest instruments would only count as >"medium-sized" in the USA...    
(back) Subject: RE: on digital organs From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 18:27:50 -0400       On 13 Jul 2004 at 18:58, Jeff White expounded:   > Desiree', if you want a TOTAL tracker instrument (and I mean the only > electrical items are the blower and lights), try Martin Ott of St. > Louis, also. I've always been very impressed with his style of > building trackers.   Trinity Lutheran in Lansdale (PA) has a Martin Ott tracker, vintage 1999. = Check out the music pages on http://www.trinitylansdale.com to see the console = and casework and the stoplist.   --Shirley        
(back) Subject: RE: "Catholic" organ specs From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 10:44:45 +1200     >I have often wondered if E. Power Biggs would have simply been Ernest P. Biggs if he had remained in England!   More like he would have been "Ted". :-) Or perhaps "Ernie?"   Ross   --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.719 / Virus Database: 475 - Release Date: 12/07/2004    
(back) Subject: Dick Liebert Music From: "Chip Bowden" <chip_bowden@emoryhealthcare.org> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 18:46:43 -0400   Does anyone have a copy of Dick Liebert's " Under the Christmas Mistletoe"?= (not a recording, but the actual music) I have been searching for a copy = of this for years. It has been out of print since the mid 60s. =20    
(back) Subject: Re: "Catholic" organ specs From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 18:37:22 -0500   Ernie? Who's Ernie? Edward George Power Biggs =3D E. Power Biggs. Maybe = I missed the joke here?   ----- Original Message ----- From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, July 14, 2004 5:44 PM Subject: RE: "Catholic" organ specs     > > >I have often wondered if E. Power Biggs would have simply been Ernest = P. > Biggs if he had remained in England! > > More like he would have been "Ted". :-) Or perhaps "Ernie?" > > Ross > > --- > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). > Version: 6.0.719 / Virus Database: 475 - Release Date: 12/07/2004 > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >