PipeChat Digest #4620 - Thursday, July 15, 2004
 
New York and hymn playing
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Hymns
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Playing hymns in such a way as to ensure the victims are properly and tho
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: Hymns
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Playing hymns in such a way as to ensure the victims are properlyand 
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
RE: New York Style
  by "Milo R. Shepherd" <mrstwin2@cox.net>
Re: Hymns
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Hymns
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Playing hymns in such a way as to ensure the victims are	properly and
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Catholic Music
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
RE: Playing during liturgical events
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
RE: "Catholic" organ specs
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Information please!
  by "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net>
Re: Catholic Music
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: Catholic Music
  by "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Hymns
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Catholic Music
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
 

(back) Subject: New York and hymn playing From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 13:11:39 -0500   First off, this list is a fount of information and invaluable for sharing ideas and forming friendships with colleagues near and far. However, I must beat the dead horse and make two very obvious points. There's an exception (and usually many more than one) to any rule or stereotype; in the city that never sleeps, as well as elsewhere, there is a plethora of hymn and worship styles. And, Desiree, because you didn't ask the follow-up question to your mentor, we may never know his particular meaning. Secondly, nothing beats hitting the road and personally experiencing the services of other churches, because worship is a subjective experience and sometimes defies description. This from someone who has witnessed almost everything except snake-handling.   That being said, I feel I must agree with John Speller here regarding his first experience in New York, which was similar to my own. I must confess, Alan, that I don't remember participating in any Lutheran services during that stay, and my experiences elsewhere have led me to the conclusion that generally Lutheran congregations are more lusty in their singing of the hymns than perhaps the RCs and the Episcopalians (the Southern Baptists fall into the "lusty" variety also, but we won't go there).   During that first trip I worshipped in a number of Episcopalian and Roman Catholic churches, and took in a temple service too. I found generally that the Episcopalian services (singled out because I am one, and there is an Episcopal church on almost every street corner there) tended to not only fail to encourage congregational singing, but actually acted to discourage congregational participation at all. The hymns were fast, with little pause between verses, no time for breath, loud and screechy post-expressionistic interludes after which the congregation was confounded and not able to timely come in on the next verse. As a result, most of the singing was provided by the choir.   Of course, there were exceptions. In fact, one of the most moving services and best sermons I experienced was at a Roman Catholic church, and in spite of the music (with a brand new pipe organ, no less). At another very old Episcopal church, I was struck by the extreme friendliness and helpfulness of the members toward each other and strangers (the organ that was there is no longer, thanks to 9-11). For a person in NYC less than twenty-four hours and prepared for the stereotypical nasty native, I was in complete shock.   Now to the point of hymn playing. It is an art, and requires a delicate balancing act. For me the goal is to inspire the congregation to sing at their natural rhythm and pace (not too slow, and not too fast), and to add enough to the harmonization, in keeping with the text without making it a dramatic production, that makes worship something more than ordinary. People have to know when to sing, to be able to follow easily, to be encouraged to participate, and to go away feeling they have been in the presence of God and are ready to love and serve him. Verse harmonizations should be interesting without distracting from the prime directive: leading the congregation in song. No variation is uninspiring; too much detracts from the business at hand.   Another point: pauses between verses need to be something more than the one measure, but not long enough to confuse the congregation when to resume singing (the rule of thumb I have heard others expound is a measure and a half, but I believe there is a natural pause of about that length that many people, not all, can feel without counting). At the last church I subbed, the minister of music waved his arms during the hymns, a useless gesture to be sure, and paused only the length of the last measure. It was high impossible to change registration at all without pistons and with heavy drawknobs. And most of the congregation was not ready to resume, missing the first measure of the next verse. Of course, if your church sings nothing more than "Near the cross", "What a friend", and "Nearer, my God, to thee" (hymns I love and grew up with), an organist will have plenty of time.   Someone suggested limiting new or unfamiliar hymns to one a service, which is a good idea. However, where I subbed for a month earlier this year, the priest handed me the responsibility of choosing the hymns. Not knowing what was familiar or no, my task each Sunday before the service was to meet with the choir and to familiarize them with the hymns. If the choir knew the hymns, the congregation many times would follow without hesitation.   Anyway, I've said too much already, and my paintbrush and the porch bannisters await.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 02:17:54 +0800   Does a hymn in irregular meter have stanzas or verses?   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D stanza 1. A number of lines or verses forming a division of a song or poem, and = agreeing in meter, rhyme, number of lines, etc., with other divisions; a = part of a poem, ordinarily containing every variation of measure in that = poem; a combination or arrangement of lines usually recurring; whether = like or unlike, in measure.   Horace confines himself strictly to one sort of verse, or stanza, in every = ode. --Dryden.   2. (Arch.) An apartment or division in a building; a room or chamber.   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D verse 1. a. A single metrical line in a poetic composition; one line of poetry. b. A division of a metrical composition, such as a stanza of a poem or = hymn. c. A poem. 2. Metrical or rhymed composition as distinct from prose; poetry. 3. a. The art or work of a poet. b. A group of poems: read a book of satirical verse. 4. Metrical writing that lacks depth or artistic merit. 5. A particular type of metrical composition, such as blank verse or free = verse. 6. One of the numbered subdivisions of a chapter in the Bible.     ----- Original Message ----- From: Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 13:59:22 -0400 To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Hymns   > As long as we're talking about hymns (and especially in such a salutary > fashion), shouldn't someone point out that Bibles (including Psalms) = have > "verses", while hymns have "stanzas"? > > Alan       -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   -- _______________________________________________ Talk More, Pay Less with Net2Phone Direct(R), up to 1500 minutes free! http://www.net2phone.com/cgi-bin/link.cgi?143          
(back) Subject: Playing hymns in such a way as to ensure the victims are properly and thoroughly anesthesized! From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 11:46:34 -0700   Monty Bennett said,   >> I For example, on a hymn such as Nettleton "Come Thou Fount", the right hand might do some kind of running water arpeggio motive up and down the Great, while the accompaniment is played on the choir; or like in his Concertato on " A Might Fortress" the verse that speaks about "and though this world with devils filled..." where he romps around on snarly reeds while the congregation sings.... <<     Roger Brown demurred, [sniff, sniff, nose in air:]   >I wouldn't have a bar of that sort of stuff - not while the congregation was singing.... [T]he sort of thing you describe above would be considered well beyond good taste here .... <       More's the pity, with all due respect.   I do this sort of 'scene painting' myself. Not on every verse of every hymn, but as a "dash of spice" now and then -- to liven up otherwise cold and bland stew.   The pastor is thrilled by this creativity, and so are the parishioners. Rev. has complimented me many times on my hymn ACCOMPANYING, saying that hymns come alive under my fingers in a new and glorious way -- noting that, to be sure, it's a skill that far too few organists possess.   I will say that I don't make sudden registrational changes, e.g., going from full-tilt to flute celeste from one chord to the next, but I certainly do use colorful and descriptive registrations when appropriate. [yes, yes, a relative term, I know. My definition of "appropriate" clearly is rather more liberal than some other folks']   And some of my fellow colleagues would probably fall over in a dead faint if they heard what I do during the scripture readings. But again, many of my congregants have very effusively noted how my musical improvisations really make the scriptures come alive by adding a depth of meaning and "atmosphere." A visiting pastor who participated in our Maunday Thusday service told me that he had "goose bumps" during the readings and he had never been so deeply moved.   I say all this not as braggadocio but just to point out that a lot of organists are missing great opportunities to use their instruments in new and novel ways, that would surely be well received if only they dared 'push the envelope' -- but shy from doing so lest they be held to being "beyond good taste."   Good Lord. Since when did going to church have to do with "good taste?" We're talking about spirituality here, not a foo-foo high tea.   Oh ... well, er, on the other hand, in some churches.......   Never mind.     ~ C    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 14:56:49 -0400   On 7/15/04 2:17 PM, "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> wrote:   > Does a hymn in irregular meter have stanzas or verses? >=20 Yes. (Usually.) (But not always.)   There's no universal rule, and, if there were, only a pedant would try to apply it universally. I have a friend who is a much-published poet, and h= e usually uses the term =B3strophe.=B2 That=B9s valid, too.   There are hymns, songs, chants, chorales, anthems, motets, and canticles that don=B9t have stanzas or verses (or strophes) at ALL. They just start, and go, and go until they=B9re finished (e.g., Christ ist erstanden). And then there are refrains, antiphons, and choruses, etc.   No rule fits everything. It=B9s MUSIC, for Pete=B9s sake!   Alan (who should relax)          
(back) Subject: RE: Playing hymns in such a way as to ensure the victims are properlyand thoroughly anesthesized! From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 13:57:36 -0500   You can be sure J.S. never elaborated on his figured-bass and melody lines! (Need I say my tongue's entirely in cheek!)   =20   Daniel   =20   Timothy Daniel Hancock   =20   Dean, American Guild of Organists, Springfield Chapter   Organist, Grace United Methodist Church   Organist, St. Agnes Cathedral Church   =20   847 South Weller Avenue   Springfield, Missouri 65802   417.862.6272 or dhancock@brpae.com   =20   -----Original Message----- From: Charlie Lester [mailto:crl@137.com]=20 Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2004 1:47 PM To: PipeChat Cc: Monty Bennett o Subject: Playing hymns in such a way as to ensure the victims are properlyand thoroughly anesthesized!   =20   Monty Bennett said,   =20   >> I For example, on a hymn such as Nettleton "Come Thou=20   Fount", the right hand might do some kind of running water=20   arpeggio motive up and down the Great, while the=20   accompaniment is played on the choir; or like in his=20   Concertato on " A Might Fortress" the verse that speaks=20   about "and though this world with devils filled..." where he=20   romps around on snarly reeds while the congregation=20   sings.... <<   =20   =20   Roger Brown demurred, [sniff, sniff, nose in air:]   =20   >I wouldn't have a bar of that sort of stuff - not while=20   the congregation was singing.... [T]he sort of thing you=20   describe above would be considered well beyond good taste=20   here .... <   =20   =20   =20   More's the pity, with all due respect.   =20   I do this sort of 'scene painting' myself. Not on every=20   verse of every hymn, but as a "dash of spice" now and then=20   -- to liven up otherwise cold and bland stew.   =20   The pastor is thrilled by this creativity, and so are the=20   parishioners. Rev. has complimented me many times on my hymn=20   ACCOMPANYING, saying that hymns come alive under my fingers=20   in a new and glorious way -- noting that, to be sure, it's a=20   skill that far too few organists possess.   =20    
(back) Subject: RE: New York Style From: "Milo R. Shepherd" <mrstwin2@cox.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 15:02:29 -0400   but what about the gunshots?   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Peter Rodwell Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2004 1:14 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: New York Style     Quoting Desire=E9:   > My mentor, the late, great James Dale Holloway once told me that > some east caost schools, especially Westminster, teach "New York" > style hymn playing. What does this consist of?   It really requires a theater organ with all those special effects: police siren, crowd murmurs, car horns, screams of mugging victims...   Peter.   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 15:04:04 EDT   In a message dated 7/15/2004 2:57:31 PM Eastern Standard Time,=20 acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   > It=E2=80=99s MUSIC, for Pete=E2=80=99s sake! >=20   Dear Dear Alan,     who is Pete?   dale in florida  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 14:07:12 -0500   HymnsIn the classical sense a verse is a couplet, so that hymns like = "Draw nigh and take the body of the Lord" (sung to "Song 46" by Gibbons) = would, I suppose have verses, while other hymns with more than two lines = per stanza ought properly to have stanzas. Verses in Isaiah, etc., are = couplets of Hebrew poetry. However, most people have long used the = terms interchangeably, so that for example the Oxford Dictionary notes = the use of "verse" to mean "stanza" as going right back to Middle = English.   John Speller ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Alan Freed=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2004 12:59 PM Subject: Hymns     As long as we're talking about hymns (and especially in such a = salutary fashion), shouldn't someone point out that Bibles (including = Psalms) have "verses", while hymns have "stanzas"?   Alan
(back) Subject: Re: Playing hymns in such a way as to ensure the victims are properly and thoroughly anesthesized! From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 15:12:34 -0400   on 7/15/04 2:46 PM, Charlie Lester at crl@137.com wrote:   > > And some of my fellow colleagues would probably fall over in > a dead faint if they heard what I do during the scripture > readings. But again, many of my congregants have very > effusively noted how my musical improvisations really make > the scriptures come alive by adding a depth of meaning and > "atmosphere." A visiting pastor who participated in our > Maunday Thusday service told me that he had "goose bumps" > during the readings and he had never been so deeply moved. >   Charlie, you play during the scripture readings? That's really cool. = What denomination is your church? I can recall that it was de rigueur circa = 1963 to play softly during the pastoral prayer in the Disciples of Christ = church I grew up in, and was playing in at that time, and did so, but I haven't done it in any other church. I would love to, however. Our Lutheran = church doesn't have "pastoral prayers". Maybe none do. In my home church forty years ago, the pastoral prayer was so meaty it was a second sermon. Our scripture readings are done by members of the congregation, with varying degrees of mispronunciation. So I'm afraid playing while they read would only distract them.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Catholic Music From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 12:14:17 -0700   In my previous comments about organs in Catholic churches and the priests who hate them, I certainly was not venturing into "politically incorrect" broadbrushing of all Catholics or any other group for that matter.   I was merely sharing MY experience across nearly 35 years as a church musician and having served just about every flavor of Christianity you can name, including quite a few Catholic churches.   By a fairly long long shot, music in the numerous Catholic churches I have played has singularly been the most lackluster, uninspiring, and boring of them all; and the pastors and ministerial staff the most crabby, uncharitable, and miserly of them all.   I dunno, maybe it's just a regional thing. But it surely is the case, by and large, out here in the, oh, dozen or so Catholic churches in Los Angeles where I have played or subbed.   I have had a couple of fairly long-term stints in Catholic parishes out here and I can recall none of them in glowing terms regarding the music, most especially the congregational singing. To the contrary, the direct opposite holds true in every case.   And most of the priests, who usually seem to fancy themselves the greatest cantors of all time, croak and wabble and wail and bellow (or mumble) their sung-portions of the liturgy with ill-tempered (in every sense of the word) semitones that would even drive John Cage mad.   And, yet, the organist damned-well-better find the right key without any fumbling around, or God Help him afterward when he has to hear it from the priest.   "What the HELL were you doing before the 'Our Father' ??"   "Well, um, I had to get from B quarter flatted half sharp minor to F major, the key it is written in......."   Hell Hath No Fury Like A Priest Scorned. I have learned this the hard way.   And when substituting, I have nearly always received strict and terse admonishments from the titular, "Don't play anything loud -- nothing above foundations 8s and 4s, and nothing heavy in the pedal; for God's Sake DO NOT USE the 32-foots!   Time and time again I have heard this.   Me, being a True Baptist at heart regarding music, have sometimes strayed from the beaten path and have deigned to add maybe just the 16-foot Bourdon in the pedal in lieu of the asthmatic Quintadena. And had a new you-know-what ripped for doing so. I've been bellowed at, yelled at, snarled at, insulted and humiliated by more priests than you can shake a stick at. All for having the cheek to encroach into their threshold of pain as regards the organ.   And, no, it's not like I reach for every knob on the console including the Party Horns to play the 3-fold Amen.   The net result of those emotionally scarring experiences, sad to say, is that I have ever-after declined any opportunities to do any service work in Catholic churches.   Well, the emotional scarring AND the meager pay, that is.   If the stipend were worth it, instead of the token "chump change" that the Msgr begrudgingly doles out after the mass, usually handed over in crumpled singles that faintly reek of cheap bourbon, I might be more inclined to endure the painful effrontery. As it is, "Sorry, I am already engaged."   So there you have it.   Again, I am sure it is not so in ALL Catholic churches. Just in all the ones that I have played in.   ~ C      
(back) Subject: RE: Playing during liturgical events From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 14:19:41 -0500   I play during the pastoral prayer at the United Methodist Church I play for in Springfield, Missouri. It's the only time I can use the 8' Dolcan and Celeste on the neo-baroque instrument--every other single stop eclipses them totally. And, it's good practice for in-service improvisation, if you aren't used to doing it.   One drawback that if foresee is that it reinforces the idea of organ music as "background music" during the service, and I'm not too anxious to succumb to that, but otherwise, I enjoy it.   Daniel   Timothy Daniel Hancock =20 Dean, American Guild of Organists, Springfield Chapter Organist, Grace United Methodist Church Organist, St. Agnes Cathedral Church =20 847 South Weller Avenue Springfield, Missouri 65802 417.862.6272 or dhancock@brpae.com =20 -----Original Message----- From: Randolph Runyon [mailto:runyonr@muohio.edu]=20 Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2004 2:13 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Playing hymns in such a way as to ensure the victims areproperly and thoroughly anesthesized!   on 7/15/04 2:46 PM, Charlie Lester at crl@137.com wrote:   Charlie, you play during the scripture readings? That's really cool. What denomination is your church? I can recall that it was de rigueur circa 1963 to play softly during the pastoral prayer in the Disciples of Christ church I grew up in, and was playing in at that time, and did so, but I haven't done it in any other church. I would love to, however. Our Lutheran church doesn't have "pastoral prayers". Maybe none do. In my home church forty years ago, the pastoral prayer was so meaty it was a second sermon. Our scripture readings are done by members of the congregation, with varying degrees of mispronunciation. So I'm afraid playing while they read would only distract them.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: RE: "Catholic" organ specs From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 07:42:15 +1200   Colin,   Could you email me privately, please. Thanks.   Ross     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.720 / Virus Database: 476 - Release Date: 14/07/2004    
(back) Subject: Information please! From: "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 15:44:52 -0400   Does anyone on this list know how to get in touch with Dr. Alfred Cresci, who is director of music at Holy Innocents Roman Catholic Church in Brooklym, NY. Please email me off-list! Thanks.   Phil Stimmel   The Estey Pipe Organ www.esteyorgan.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Catholic Music From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 16:09:33 EDT   C,   I once had a small battle with a certain Monsignor over the use of plainchant. He suggested that "plainchant is ridiculous when sung in = English." I retorted, "No, Monsignor, plainchant is ridiculous when sung by YOU. In = any language". He was so incredibly clueless that he didn't fire me.   So, it's not just LA.   Pax, Bill H. "This Email Protected from Ridicule by Spellcheck";)  
(back) Subject: Re: Catholic Music From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 13:28:47 -0700   In fairness to the RCs, as long as priests are "sacrament machines" and have to celebrate 3-5 Masses every Sunday, they're not going to have much time OR energy for the niceties of liturgy and music. Gone are the days when we had six Sunday Masses at Holy Rosary in Cleveland, and six priests to celebrate them.   We did a Solemn High Mass, Procession, and Benediction one Corpus Christi in Founders' Chapel of the Catholic university in San Diego, according to the Novus Ordo -- music in Latin (Mozart and plainchant), readings and prayers (all sung) in English, all according to the rubrics. The seminarians stood in the back of the church and LAUGHED. They didn't participate; they LAUGHED.   I despair of both the RCs and white-bread suburban Rite II Anglicans. Neither have a CLUE as to the riches of their respective traditions.   And the coming NEW RC translation of the Mass is even uglier ... of course, that means ALL the music has to be re-written or written anew.   I refuse to compose or arrange for the Roman Rite. I compose and arrange for Rite II Anglicans in the hopes that SOMETHING *might* get preserved.   I'm glad I'm RETIRED (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   DERREINETOR@aol.com wrote:   > C, > > I once had a small battle with a certain Monsignor over the use of > plainchant. He suggested that "plainchant is ridiculous when sung in > English." I retorted, "No, Monsignor, plainchant is ridiculous when sung =   > by YOU. In any language". He was so incredibly clueless that he didn't > fire me. > > So, it's not just LA. > > Pax, > Bill H. > "This Email Protected from Ridicule by Spellcheck";)      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 17:15:52 -0400   On 7/15/04 3:04 PM, "Keys4bach@aol.com" <Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote:   > who is Pete? >=20 Oh, he=B9s on a different list. I=B9ll tell him you=B9re interested!   Hee hee   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Catholic Music From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 16:21:33 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: DERREINETOR@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2004 3:09 PM Subject: Re: Catholic Music     > I once had a small battle with a certain Monsignor over the use of plainchant. He suggested that "plainchant is ridiculous when > sung in English."   There is, however, some truth in what the Monsignor said. The problem is that plainchant is written for Latin and in a Latin sentence the stresses fall in quite different places from where they do in English. It is = rarely possible to fit English words to plainchant without either straying from = the original plainchant, or having the stresses in very awkward places. In particular the principal stressed syllable in English sentences tends to come much nearer the beginning of the sentence than in Latin, and in = psalms and canticles Anglican chant takes account of this by moving off the reciting note on the principal stressed syllable and then dividing up the rest of the sentence. In plainchant it is necessary to keep on the = reciting note until toward the end of the sentence, which results in some of the later syllables toward the end of the sentence being overstressed and earlier ones receiving insufficient stress. Plainchant works fine in = Latin, which is what it was designed to do.   John Speller