PipeChat Digest #4625 - Saturday, July 17, 2004
 
Re:  Playing during liturgical events
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Talkin' back to the Preacher
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re:  some REAL evangelical service-playing
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: on digital organs
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
something else new
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: something else new
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: some REAL evangelical service-playing
  by "Roger Brown" <roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org>
Re: Playing during liturgical events
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
motivation, engagement, participation
  by "v hatch" <vhatch@hotmail.com>
Re: motivation, engagement, participation
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: something else new
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
organ music for August 15th
  by "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: something else new
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: motivation, engagement, participation
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: something else new
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Sparse Swells and key channel repercussions
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: organ music for August 15th
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: something else new
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Sparse Swells
  by "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: "Lights ... Cameras ... ACTION!!!"
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Re: Sparse Swells
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Playing during liturgical events From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 07:37:26 EDT   >Doesn't matter what makes the music; doesn't matter what kind of bread = or >wine/juice you use; doesn't matter who speaks the words...etc   Speaking of wine/juice, has anyone seen or used those new disposable communion cups that have the wafer and the juice all hermetically sealed = "for your protection"? I was at a conference about a month ago, and there was a = company who had these things on display and then they used them for the final communion service..they also had them on display to try. You peel a top = layer of plastic back to expose the wafer, then pull back another layer and drink = the juice, like a little coffer creamer thingy. It's all in one...kinda = wild. > PS: I was just ribbing you about starting the ol' p vs e war. :) LOL I know Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: Talkin' back to the Preacher From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 07:48:06 EDT   Neil wrote: >This is an example of the "call-response" technique (for lack of a = better >word). It can be very effective, when authentic. Not wholly unlike = what a good >theater organist does. What one sees on TV is so many times "staged" thanks to the likes of TBN--but I won't go there--but Neil is correct, when done authentically, = it is an effective technicque. It can be overdone, but when used sparingly, the = organ can add some punctuation and emphasize some of the high points. In our = "free church" traditions, even the prepared sermons may take radical turns if = the Holy Spirit directs the preacher to take a different direction, so it = keeps everyone on their toes. So we always need to be listening and be = prepared to add a "punch" or gliss as needed. >That there may not be a sermon text does not imply a lack of = preparation. This is a very important point that Neil raises. This is not only = limited to Baptists, but I know of many Presbyterian and Methodist ministers who preach without prepared sermon notes. They spend hours each week = memorizing their sermons so they are not tied down to words on the page, so they can be "freed up" to communicate effectively. It's all a matter of if one wants = to preach or if one wants to read a sermon--a matter of style. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: some REAL evangelical service-playing From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 08:01:56 EDT   >> Apparently folks these days NEED some sort of noise in the background >> whatever they're doing. Silence and the opportunity to contemplate >> frightens them, apparently.   >Exactly so. >And when we reach that point, it devalues the organ, it devalues the = music and >it devalues the liturgy. Harry asked a legitimate question, not knowing about our B3 stylings = during sermons over here in the States, but Roger missed the point completely. The background "music" during sermons, is not a constant stream of music, =   it's just punctuation. An evangelical sermon might go for 45 minutes to = an hour and a half or more. We consider a 30 minute sermon short. = Personally, I think that the organ chiming in is to keep listeners awake!!! Anyway, = it's not a style of music, it's just notes or chords, not really melodies, = just snippets...not "muzak", adding excitment, emotion, Spirit, things that = are not welcomed in some churches. People will be standing up during sermons, clapping, saying Amen as they agree with a minister's points, and the = Hammondist will then let out a riff of some sort to "talk back to the Preacher". I fail = to see how that devalues the liturgy or the music, or even the organ, since = that is one of the features and requirements of that style of church, and one = of the trademark styles of music for which the Hammond organ has evolved. The music doesn't continue endlessly while the minister talks, it's just = an occasional punch here an there to add some spice--think of it as some = Tabasco sauce for a sermon. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: on digital organs From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 08:23:10 EDT   In a message dated 7/13/2004 7:50:10 PM Eastern Standard Time, reedstop@charter.net writes: if you want a TOTAL tracker instrument (and I mean the only electrical = items are the blower and lights), try Martin Ott of St. Louis, also. I've = always been very impressed with his style of building trackers. The new tracker Ott organ at Penn State, Behrend campus in Erie, PA has electric stop action. This instrument is typical of the trackers I've = seen, with a sparse swell (with a krummhorn as the only reed) and a fairly well = developed Great and Pedal. In playing the 2' stops in upper register of the = manuals, the pipes sound as if they're being strangled, with a great deal of gurgle = and squawk, sounds I heard also on the big Ott in Lansdale PA at the = Philadelphia AGO several years ago.   Why do new trackers tend to have really skimpy swells, without even a trumpet? Does all upperwork on trackers have this quirky sound?     Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: something else new From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 08:31:47 EDT   HI all:   I see on my CPH calendar that August 15 is St. Mary, the Mother of Jesus Sunday.   What can i play in my little ELCA church to keep the RC-transfers happy without upsetting anti Mary bias?   Currently listed is:   My Soul doth magnify-----JSB and the Queen of the Universe by Charlie Callahan/Morningstar Pub.   dale looking for love in all the wrong places..... Florida  
(back) Subject: Re: something else new From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 06:45:45 -0700   .....how about a selection from Dupre's op. 18? The closing piece from = the Magnificat is a rip-snortin' 48 measure toccata.... =20   -Jonathan ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Keys4bach@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Saturday, July 17, 2004 5:31 AM Subject: something else new     HI all:   I see on my CPH calendar that August 15 is St. Mary, the Mother of = Jesus Sunday.   What can i play in my little ELCA church to keep the RC-transfers = happy without upsetting anti Mary bias?   Currently listed is:   My Soul doth magnify-----JSB and the Queen of the Universe by Charlie Callahan/Morningstar Pub.   dale looking for love in all the wrong places..... Florida=20     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.718 / Virus Database: 474 - Release Date: 7/9/2004
(back) Subject: Re: some REAL evangelical service-playing From: "Roger Brown" <roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org> Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2004 00:09:39 +1000   On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 10:01 pm, RMB10@aol.com wrote:   > =A0I fail to > see how that devalues the liturgy or the music, or =A0even the organ, sin= ce > that is one of the features and requirements of that style =A0of church, = and > one of the trademark styles of music for which the Hammond organ =A0has > evolved.   No I agree - it's your tradition and that's perfectly valid.   I had in mind more the attitude that permeates even some Anglican circles t= hat=20 EVERY GAP in a service MUST be covered up by music - silence MUST be avoide= d. That attitude seemed to be implied by some of your earlier comments and the= re=20 is no doubt in my mind that to regard the organ as the provider of liturgic= al=20 muzac does devalue.   But I do recognise that yours is a very different tradition - different val= ues=20 apply.     =2D-=20 Roger Brown robrown@melbpc.org.au roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org http://rogerbrown.no-ip.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Playing during liturgical events From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 10:17:14 -0400   On 7/17/04 7:37 AM, "RMB10@aol.com" <RMB10@aol.com> wrote:   > those new disposable communion cups that have the wafer and the juice = all > hermetically sealed "for your protection"   I certainly hope the packaging contains all the required nutritional information.   Alan    
(back) Subject: motivation, engagement, participation From: "v hatch" <vhatch@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 09:18:55 -0500   I have been wondering about something: how come there is so much participation in this listserv? Is there an equal amount in the "orgel" listserv--whatever that is? (as a matter of fact what IS the address for the "orgel" one?) I have been trying to figure out why, on the other hand, =   there seems to be almost NO participation from around the country in a listserv designed for college and university teachers. When I got home = from the Los Angeles AGO convention there were 314 messages on my pipechat, but =   about 3 on the college teacher thing (the college teacher thing is a listserv provided by AAUP, American Association of University Professors, but open to anyone interested, I believe--you don't have to be a member of =   the AAUP). Does anyone know whether this energy and willingness to participate is typical of other disciplines--like English litereature or chemistry or cars or whatever?ARE there indeed chat rooms or listservs for =   all these different kinds of fields? And what's the story on this new listserv for organists that was just introduced in the last few days--the Organ Forum. Maybe what I need to do is find out whether there are any peple out there that are involved in the organ discussions and also happen =   to be college teachers who could be recruited to spice up--enliven, energize, empower the AAUP group.   _________________________________________________________________ Don=92t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search! http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200636ave/direct/01/    
(back) Subject: Re: motivation, engagement, participation From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 09:38:31 -0500   Ooooh... what a juicy question! I can't wait to hear other responses. I= 've=20 got a couple of quick thoughts. I think the first that comes to mind is=20 that organists and afficiados tend to be really into it, and yet often ha= ve=20 no one to discuss it with. If you go to the general public and try to st= art=20 a discussion about whether tracker, EP, or DE is the way to go, you won't= =20 get very far. =20   Even car buffs have an easier time. Don't get me started on the whole fr= ont- drive vs rear drive debate! Or turbo versus naturally aspirated. Are=20 airbags worth the risk of decapitation for short drivers? But I have lit= tle=20 trouble finding people in "real life" to argue about these things with. = But=20 who can an organist argue with but other organists? Organists don't usua= lly=20 interact with their colleagues on a daily basis as professors do. =20 Professors can do all their arguing on their lunch breaks. =20   I'm substituting the word "argue" for "discuss" in a tongue-in-cheek way.   The other thought is that organists have way too much time on their hands= ,=20 apparently! :) (woah... duck) I'm planning on spending a lot less time= on=20 here myself, starting, um, tomorrow. :)   Andy     On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 09:18:55 -0500, v hatch wrote > I have been wondering about something: how come there is so much=20 > participation in this listserv? Is there an equal amount in the=20 > "orgel" listserv--whatever that is? (as a matter of fact what IS=20 > the address for the "orgel" one?) I have been trying to figure out=20 > why, on the other hand, there seems to be almost NO participation=20 > from around the country in a listserv designed for college and=20 > university teachers. When I got home from the Los Angeles AGO=20 > convention there were 314 messages on my pipechat, but about 3 on=20 > the college teacher thing (the college teacher thing is a listserv=20 > provided by AAUP, American Association of University Professors, but=20 > open to anyone interested, I believe--you don't have to be a member=20 > of the AAUP). Does anyone know whether this energy and willingness=20 > to participate is typical of other disciplines--like English=20 > litereature or chemistry or cars or whatever?ARE there indeed chat=20 > rooms or listservs for all these different kinds of fields? And=20 > what's the story on this new listserv for organists that was just=20 > introduced in the last few days--the Organ Forum. Maybe what I need=20 > to do is find out whether there are any peple out there that are=20 > involved in the organ discussions and also happen to be college=20 > teachers who could be recruited to spice up--enliven, energize, > empower the AAUP group. >=20 > _________________________________________________________________ > Don=92t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search!=20 > http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200636ave/direct/01/ >=20 > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related=20 > topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List:=20 mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>       A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: something else new From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 10:48:19 -0400   On 7/17/04 8:31 AM, "Keys4bach@aol.com" <Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote:   > My Soul doth magnify-----JSB and > the Queen of the Universe by Charlie Callahan/Morningstar Pub. >=20 The usual =B3must=B2 for the day in ELCA is LBW175, Ye watchers and ye holy ones. A bulletin note can clue people that the second stanza is addressed to the Blessed Virgin.   See also LBW180. =20   If you have =B3Sundays and Seasons=B2 from APH, it has more suggestions. If not, buy one in the fall for 2005.   Alan    
(back) Subject: organ music for August 15th From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 08:33:33 -0700   Any of the Dupre Antiphons / Ave maris stella / Magnficat.   The first of the Three Gregorian Paraphrases of Langlais (Ave Maria/Ave Maris Stella, isn't it?) ... it's not well-known, but it's quite lovely.   SOMEBODY must have written a prelude on "Sing of Mary" (Pleading Saviour).   I think there's a Tournemire folio for the Assumption in L'Orgue Mystique.   Liszt wrote a prelude on the Arcadelt Ave Maria.   Pachelbel Magnificat -- there are a zillion of them.   Titelouze Ave Maris Stella (?), Magnificat (several)   Dandrieu - Magnificat (several)   Titcomb - Benedictu tu (probably out of print)   Boellmann - Priere a Notre Dame (Suite Gothique)   There's all kinds of Marian stuff in the Guilmant L'Organiste Liturgique .... there's a big postlude on the Assumption Office Hymn in L'Organiste Practique ("Induit justitiam" ... is that it?) ... there are also some nice versets on the Magnificat in that same volume       Interesting that ELCA (in accordance with Martin Luther's writings about Mary) keeps St. Mary on the day, while the ECUSA liturgical deformers transfer it to Monday, a transfer that MOST anglo-catholic churches will, of course, ignore.   Cheers,   Bud                   Keys4bach@aol.com wrote:   > HI all: > > I see on my CPH calendar that August 15 is St. Mary, the Mother of Jesus =   > Sunday. > > What can i play in my little ELCA church to keep the RC-transfers happy > without upsetting anti Mary bias? > > Currently listed is: > > My Soul doth magnify-----JSB and > the Queen of the Universe by Charlie Callahan/Morningstar Pub. > > dale looking for love in all the wrong places..... > Florida      
(back) Subject: Re: something else new From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 11:46:01 EDT   In a message dated 7/17/2004 9:46:15 AM Eastern Standard Time, giwro@adelphia.net writes:   > a rip-snortin' 48 measure toccata....   do i have time to re learn it? CCM75 was a LONGGGGGGGGGGGG time ago.....     dale saying thanks  
(back) Subject: Re: motivation, engagement, participation From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 11:48:30 EDT   we are an odd bunch with too much time on our hands at the wrong time thus =   leaving us too much time to surf and play and create discussion holes in = the universe making the Creator wonder what was the Creator thinking when = organists were invented......   no one else cares so much about their life.......   we just happen to love ours, especially since we get paid SO WELLLLLLl for =   it.   dale in Florida  
(back) Subject: Re: something else new From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 11:49:48 EDT   In a message dated 7/17/2004 10:49:20 AM Eastern Standard Time, acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   > If not, buy one in the fall for 2005.   ah the rub, i have friends at CPH so stuff is cheap there.......none at Augsburg so i have to pay retail...........   grinning   dale in florida  
(back) Subject: Sparse Swells and key channel repercussions From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 11:39:06 -0500   Steven Skinner wrote that sparse swells are "typical of the trackers = I've seen" I hope he will see a little further, since mechanical key = action has nothing at all to do with the aesthetic of "sparse swells". = Please remember that organs with tracker action include almost all of = those in Europe through the time of Caville-Coll, and in the US, up = through the time of the glorious Hook organs and those of other = nineteenth century builders in this country. Since the end of the neo = baroque style, many present day tracker action organs are again being = built with full swells. =20 As to the fluttering effect he noticed in upperwork, again this is = certainly not caused by mechanical key action, and I wonder if he = noticed that the effect was not so bad if he began with finger on the = key and pressed gently? The problem is caused by reflection of the air = impulse in the key channel with slider chests. It has been studied by = Dr. Finch in a published paper. The problem was evidently not so bad = with older slider chests which had fabric on the bottom of the channel = dividers, and no slider seals, providing a little leakage of air at the = sliders. Most new slider chests are constructed with solid plywood = bottoms for durability, and slider seals to control leakage and sticking = of the sliders. This airtight construction aggravates the problem. It = has generally been solved, however, by providing bleed holes at one and = sometimes both ends of the key channel. These are sometimes fitted with = felt rings for silence, which can be punched out as needed. This small = exit of air generally solves the fluttering problem completely, but if = you find the problem with an organ you are playing try a gentler touch.. Roy Redman
(back) Subject: Re: organ music for August 15th From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 12:43:14 -0400   On 7/17/04 11:33 AM, "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > Interesting that ELCA (in accordance with Martin Luther's writings about > Mary) keeps St. Mary on the day, while the ECUSA liturgical deformers > transfer it to Monday   Actually, it's both ELCA and LCMS (and others as well, I suspect) that do that; as a "Lesser Festival" it out-ranks a Green Sunday. ELCA calls it "Mary, Mother of Our Lord," and LCMS one-ups with "St. Mary, Mother of Our Lord." Whoopee do!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: something else new From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 12:51:14 -0400   On 7/17/04 11:49 AM, "Keys4bach@aol.com" <Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote:   > ah the rub, i have friends at CPH so stuff is cheap there.......none at > Augsburg so i have to pay retail........... >=20 Oh, I hear ya! That IS a factor. I think =B3Sundays and Seasons=B2 runs about $40. And you have to buy a new one each year. When I was your age you could buy a fat leather-bound altar missal the size of a bobsled for that kind of money.   BUT, this doesn=B9t come out of YOUR wallet. The parish buys it. Preferably two copies (one for Pastor, one for Organist). The other good news is that it=B9s really worth it! It is PACKED with terrific resource material for bot= h Pastor AND Organist, and for less than a buck a week? REALLY worth it!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Sparse Swells From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 10:00:38 -0700   What Roy said (grin). Tracker is an ACTION, *not* a tonal aesthetic. Granted, it DOES impose some limitations (mostly desirable ones) on the size and layout of the Swell organ, and also the wind-pressure(s) ... but that's ALL.   It is well to remember that most of the Victorian choral music so beloved of Anglican organists, choirs, and congregations was accompanied on tracker organs of very MODEST size by our modern standards.   An English cathedral organ of:   GREAT   16' Bourdon 8' First Open 8' Second Open 8' Claribel 8' Gamba 4' Octave 4' Flute 2 2/3' Mixture 8' Tromba   SWELL   8' Open 8' Stopt Diapason 8' Viola 8' Vox angelica 4' Gemshorn 4' Flute (2' Mixture) - added later (16' Bassoon) - added later 8' Cornopean 8' Oboe (4' Clarion) - added later   CHOIR   8' Open 8' Gedeckt 8' Dulciana 4' Principal 8' Clarionet 8' Tuba (added later)   PEDAL   32' Contra Bourdon 16' Open Wood 16' Open Metal 16' Bourdon 8' Violoncello 8' Flute 16' Trombone 8' Tromba   would have been considered QUITE adequate in 19th century England (*and still is*), and would most likely have been built with straight tracker action, except for the Pedal, which might have been tubular pneumatic late in the century.   The all-important "caged rage" English "Full Swell To Reeds" ORIGINATED on TRACKER organs.   That is NOT to excuse the "mystery division behind the shutters" consisting of 8' Gedackt, 4' Rohrfloete, 2' Prinzipal, 1 1/3' Quinte, 1/8' Zimbel III, 8' Rohrschnarrenregal found in ALL TOO MANY neo-whatever tracker organs (grin).   A SWELL that AIN'T.   Nor is it of any USE in a CHURCH other than a Germanic Lutheran congregation that celebrates the classical Lutheran liturgy of Bach's time. Last time I looked, there aren't too many of those in the US.   I am STILL mystified by ANGLICAN churches who install all-unenclosed neo-German-baroque organs.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: RE: "Lights ... Cameras ... ACTION!!!" From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 13:35:26 -0400     You wrote:   > (Not, mind you, that there's anything wrong with a bit of > theatre in church -- as "High Church Smells and Bells > Anglicans" have known, and done, for centuries: What IS all > that pomp and pageantry if it is not THEATRE? It most > certainly is not the way Jesus "Had Church" -- he seemed to > prefer sitting under a tree or standing in a boat. And I > don't recall ever seeing any portraits of him bedecked in > "High Liturgical Drag.")   I responded: Jesus Christ was a practicing Jew and no one in history has practiced Judaism better than Christ. When he was alive there were no churches in = his native land. Just synagogues and one Temple. The church was "born" in the morning hours of the day of Pentecost. Christ ascended earlier than that. How could he have possibly "Had Church"? His standing in boat or sitting under a tree are part of what's been recorded of his life. We don't know what he did in between but he was also recorded being present in synagogue and the Temple. I think you're being presumptuous with some of your statements. The church is 2000 years old. Much has happened to the church in 2000 = years. Think what has happened to the church in only 50 years? What you're interpreting as theatrics are in fact laden with symbolism and Christian instruction. The smells and bells are not necessary for Christian worship but evidently, for some, they are necessary. Please don't dismiss it as a bunch of superstitious "hocus pocus" as I think you're implying (the terms been used for centuries to describe magic tricks. "hocus pocus" was an easily regurgitated phrase people heard when mass was said in Latin.. just = a bit of history). Of all religions Christianity demands the most belief in the supernatural. The pomp and pageantry is there to visually remind those present that something very unique, unusual, sanctified and supernatural = is accompanying the rather odd looking clothing surrounded by the strange and very inefficient architecture. Some think they don't require the visual reminders and are content to have one sense involved: their hearing. I've experienced both and I'd say there's plenty of room for a reasonable balance. All "smells and bells" with a contempt and almost no time for a homily, sermon (whatever you wish to call it) cannot honestly satisfy a worshippers' appetite saddled with a "lively faith". The same can be said equally for those whose church experience involves a prelude, = announcements, a few hymns, a few prayers, maybe an anthem, a reading from scripture that usually has absolutely no relation whatsoever to the sermon which usually lasts 45 minutes offered by a layman wearing business attire and a once in = a while involvement of the communion table wheeled in for the occasion with = an explanation that the Lords' Supper is nothing other than a "remembrance feast".."nothing supernatural going on, that's just barbaric superstition. Now, drink ye all". I used to believe that but after studying church = history on an ongoing basis I find I can no longer honestly believe that.   Thanks for reading. A. Mead          
(back) Subject: Re: Sparse Swells From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2004 12:28:38 -0500   To be totally controversial here... I think what we're observing is that = the people who are "hanging on" to tracker action are also "hanging on" to the =   neo-baroque style. The two don't physically have to go together, but in most cases in the last 30 years, they do go together. The people who have =   come to recognize that warmer sounds are more practical are the same = people who have come to realize that electric action may in many cases be more practical. Therefore, organs with a warm sound tend to have electric = action.   Just my own opinion as it stands right now... it evolves as I constantly learn more, so don't flame me too much, but I realize I've opened myself = up to some flaming. Not long ago I was "tracker action is the only way". :)   Andy     On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 10:00:38 -0700, Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma = Publications wrote > What Roy said (grin). Tracker is an ACTION, *not* a tonal aesthetic. > Granted, it DOES impose some limitations (mostly desirable ones) on > the size and layout of the Swell organ, and also the wind-pressure(s) > ... but that's ALL.     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com