PipeChat Digest #4642 - Saturday, July 24, 2004
 
Titelouze
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
August 15th
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Re: SHEA'S PROGRAM      Re: OHS ???
  by <Swedish5702@aol.com>
Re: OHS Convention
  by "Philip Thibault" <pthibaul@maine.rr.com>
Re: organ music for August 15
  by "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net>
Aug. 15th
  by "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: OHS Convention
  by "Christopher J. Howerter" <christophhowerter@sbcglobal.net>
Re: August 15th
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
languages
  by "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net>
August 15
  by "Bernadette Wagner" <musicalgrl90@yahoo.com>
Re: August 15th
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: languages
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Attitude (and Organists)
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: SHEA'S PROGRAM      Re: OHS ???
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
the POINT about Schein, Scheidemann, Scheidt, Titelouze, etc.
  by "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: the POINT about Schein, Scheidemann, Scheidt, Titelouze, etc.
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
 

(back) Subject: Titelouze From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 02:23:45 -0700   I will have to indeed dig out my info about the organs & registrations for the music of Titelouze. Mersenne (sp?) had left behind a treatise on organs of the time and what combinations to use.   Some of the more interesting tidbits: a 1' stop on the Grand Orgue keyboard, and a "cornet" combination that did NOT include a tierce, duet/trio suggestions that again did not involve a tierce, and twists on use of the cromorne.   When my computer at church finally gets online, perhaps I'll scan the info and send it on some way.    
(back) Subject: August 15th From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 12:38:24 -0700   In Greece this day is known as the Dormition of the Virgin Mary - = literally falling asleep. It is a major religious festival and a public holiday on a par with Christmas. Some interesting people and events associated with August 15th are the departure of The Mayflower from Southampton on its way to Plymouth to collect the Pilgrim Fathers, from where it continued on September 6th on its voyage to found the British Colony in what as now = know as the United States of America. That's why we all speak English. Napoleon Bonaparte was born on this day in 1769, as was Leon Theremin in 1896, inventor of the eponymous instrument and played by theremin virtuoso and list member, Charlie Lester. Is there any music for organ and theremin? Oscar Peterson was also born on this day in 1925 - brilliant pianist but = no known organ recordings - and the Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace in = Honolulu, Hawaii, was dedicated in 1843, making it the oldest RC Cathedral in continuous use in the United States. I am sure some one can come up with something suitable to play on this occasion! John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com      
(back) Subject: Re: SHEA'S PROGRAM Re: OHS ??? From: <Swedish5702@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 09:18:58 EDT   Good Morning Scott:   Was the Shea's gig recorded? I agree with Tom H. totally when he say's = that the Shea's instrument under the guiding hands of Allen Miller is the = finest remaining in house instrument in a movie palace today.   GW to my knowledge never had the opportunity of playing this great instrument. Had he, we would have had a series of LPs/CDs on this = wonderful Wurlitzer.   Having only heard the SF Fox on LP and reel tape and CD I can only image what it sounded like in house.   Tom's memorable cassettes from the regional convention are in my most cherished location next to my Studer broadcast standard recorder/player.   Being a seasoned radio broadcaster and also in the Navy reserves assigned = to Armed Forces Radio I had the unique position of interviewing dear George many times.   I hope to transcribe these interviews and do an article for ATOS and its wonderful bi monthly publication.   Regards, F. Craig Johnson J.J. Jeffries air name both public and AFRTS!  
(back) Subject: Re: OHS Convention From: "Philip Thibault" <pthibaul@maine.rr.com> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 09:41:33 -0400       > From: Tim Bovard <tmbovard@earthlink.net> > Reply-To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Fri, 23 Jul 2004 22:05:58 -0500 > To: Pipechat email list <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: OHS Convention > > Dear List, > > OK, since someone asked (and since it would be ON topic....! <g>), = here's a > few memories of this just past convention which stand out in my mind. = I'll > try to be brief, and hope I don't step on Malcom's toes (and his > forthcoming reviews) *too* much....!!   I've got to thank you for your reports of the OHS convention....I have not joined nor have I attended a convention--I think I'd better change that situation! What great P.R. your writings are for an important = ORGANization!      
(back) Subject: Re: organ music for August 15 From: "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 06:46:23 -0700   One of Widor's symphonies (grin) ... is it the Gothique or the Romain? I can never remember, and I finally gave away most of my organ music.   Bud   Cole wrote:   > Is there anything out there on Salve Regina? If not, how about some kind =   > of improvisation with a little polyphony. I could see something fugal > coming from the refrain. Then to spice it up one could add some of the > syncopation from the "Sister Act" version. There's also the chance for > an antiphonal thingy on the stanza (verse) with the "O Maria". So many > possibilities for someone adept at that sort of thing. > > Ross Coulson "Cole" Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Aug. 15th From: "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 06:53:40 -0700   Anglicans can't quite make up their minds (grin) ... when I published the music for the Mass "Gaudeamus" (most Anglicans WOULDN'T sing the post-1950 Mass "Signum magnum"), I had to provide ossias to insert one of the following into the Introit:   "celebrating a holy-day in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary, on whose   1. Assumption 2. Dormition 3. Repose 4. Solemnity   the Angels are joyful, and join in praising the Son of God"   as there are Anglican parishes who celebrate Aug. 15 under EACH ONE of those titles (!).   The point is, Anglicans believe the BVM is in heaven; they just can't agree on how She GOT there (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: OHS Convention From: "Christopher J. Howerter" <christophhowerter@sbcglobal.net> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 10:20:37 -0400   Dear List,   There is only one correction that I need to make to Tim's posting. He = said that "His (referring to Stephen Roberts) Ives 'Variations on America' was also remarkable, ably brought to us with the efficient help of two of his students acting as the 'combination action.'" Indeed, the Ives was remarkably done, however the other console assistant was not a student of Mr. Roberts. Stephen (pronounced steh' phen) Price, a local of Buffalo = and good friend of mine, was the other assistant. He is the organ scholar at the Ascension, where the concert was. I've known him now for a year from Westminster Choir College Summer Camp, and when I heard that Mr. Roberts' concert was there, I was overjoyed. Nevertheless, I'm sure you've figured out that I was the other assistant. I must say that this convention was well planned and a great success thanks to the ever vigilant Joe McCabe. = I must mention for the fact that Tim thought Stephen was a student of Mr. Roberts, that he may very well become that next year at WCSU. Indeed, = that would be a fine choice for a school!   Sincerely, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC Organist and Choirmaster Salem Lutheran Church Naugatuck, CT Home: (203) 798-9809 Mobile: (610) 462-8017     Subject: OHS Convention From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 23 Jul 2004 22:05:58 -0500   Dear List,   OK, since someone asked (and since it would be ON topic....! <g>), here's = a few memories of this just past convention which stand out in my mind. = I'll try to be brief, and hope I don't step on Malcom's toes (and his forthcoming reviews) *too* much....!!   The first hymn of the convention, at Fred Swann's recital at St. Stanislaus. (Holy God, we praise thy Name) What a wonderful, energetic choice for the first "group sing", and early in his program at that. Though I'm not much of a vocalist myself, there is still something unbelievably magical about being part of the OHS group in song. A great reminder of what we would be in for for the rest of the week.   Karpeles Manuscript Museum's (mostly) 1913 M=F6ller. I guess I'm one of = the few who actually *did* know where I was going to be, why, and what we = would be hearing that day. :-) This event, as I'm told, fell into place at the very last possible moment, when the Karpeles organization finally came = into actual posession of the building (a former Christian Science Church). The organ within had not seen service for quite a few years before, since occupants of the structure after the Christian Scientists had disconnected the 3-phase electric service to the building, leaving the blower motor incapable of operation. This situation changed, apparently just within = the last few months (!!!) such that we were able to visit this venue and hear the instrument while we ate our boxed lunches. (Up to that point, we had already been scheduled to visit another nearby and currently operating Karpeles Museum building, which has only the facade of a not-dissimilar M=F6ller, for the same box lunch.) I found out all of this within a = couple hours of arriving in Buffalo, incidentally, when Joe McCabe cornered me = and offered me the 'chance to volunteer' <wink, wink> to fix a bad key on the organ's console, and mebbe touch up a few out of tune reed notes...? Of course I agreed, and (with borrowed tools) ended up discovering the instrument to be in remarkably good condition, with even the Echo Organ fully functional. Some would term it a "blunderbuss organ" or a "slush box" I suppose -- but I happen to kinda like that sort of organ. ;-) ;-) (we even got to hear the Harp and Chimes, as has already been reported) It was comforting to speak briefly with one of the Karpeles Directors after the event, and hear him express their conviction to retain and restore the instrument as they continue to restore the building = itself, which will become further museum space eventually.   Scott Foppiano's silent movie at the Shea's Theatre. This was just too much fun for words. Bravo!! Here also, I had a nice conversation with = one of the volunteer ushers, who was quite interested in what exactly it was that brought our ragtag group together to the theatre on a Thursday evening. When showing her my Organ Handbook, she recognized many of the churches we were going to visit. (by the pictures of their organs, no less!) They are proud of their spectacular showplace of a Theatre, for good reason indeed.   Stephen Roberts valiantly playing the operable portions of the Kimball at Church of the Ascension, Episcopal. Including the bottom few notes of a 16' reed, which were used to excellent effect during the singing of "The Royal Telephone". (I kid you not -- I still cannot quite honestly believe that the whole group didn't end up piled on the floor in laughter...!) = His Ives 'Variations on America' was also remarkable, ably brought to us with the efficient help of two of his students acting as the "combination action".   Thomas Murray, playing a nearly intact 1923 E.M. Skinner at Central Park UMC. The work of a past master of his style of organbuilding at his finest, showcased by a present master of that same style of music and = organ performance. This event was destined for perfection, by dictionary definition. Afterwards, due to the kindness of Paul Marchesano, I was = able to make the long climb up into the church tower and attic for a quick tour of the instrument's interior. Among the delights hidden up there are the bottom pipes of the (wooden) 16' Trombone, beautifully knuckle-mitered to fit under their ceiling. What gorgeous craftsmanship!   Will Headlee, on the (somewhat altered) 1903 Kimball at St.Louis R.C. Printed programs handed to us on our arrival gave complete registration data and all the notes we needed for the whole show, = including the request to hold all applause until the end of everything. Thus, as = the music progressed, I found myself being drawn further and further into it. (and further away from everything else in the conscious world) By the = time he was finished, I think you might have been able to drive a freight train through the narthex without my noticing it...but the enthusiastic applause brought me back to reality. Then we sang (Round the Lord in glory seated) and I was sent off to nether-nether land yet again...!   James Bigham, playing a hymn festival on a simply enormous instrument of many and various pedigrees, most recently as straightened out by Kegg Pipe Organ Builders. Seems as though this congregation (Holy Trinity Lutheran) is very large and very much likes to sing, and that they have been = involved in a more-or-less continuous process of enlarging and revising (mostly enlarging?) their instrument for several decades now. The results are stupendous, to say the least! Mr. Bigham is the Organist/Choirmaster of the church, and gave us a complete tour of the instrument's vast and powerful resources. (including some lovely soft stops and combinations as well, lest they be neglected in the commentary) I'd have not thought it possible for much of any organ (possibly save Atlantic City?) to overtake the complete group of OHS'ers at full tilt...but with *this* one, we eventually met our match! It'd be great fun to hear the church completely full of their own congregation (this is in fact the "normal" situation there, apparently) all belting out a good loud hymn -- I've no doubt you'd be able to hear them going from outside down the block...!!   Justin Hartz, playing an unusual little (completely original) baby Wurlitzer in the chapel of Forest Lawn Cemetery. This tiny organ seems perfectly suited to the delightful little chapel it is located within, and was shown to be capable of a surprising range of music by Mr. Hartz's program, titled "Going Out in Style". We were welcomed by the president = of the cemetery association/management (I think?) who expressed his very pleasant surprise to learn that their little organ was of great interest = to our group, and he seemed genuinely pleased to accept the Historic Organ Citation which was awarded to it during our visit. I left there with no doubt that the rare little gem of an organ will continue to remain healthy and loved, with renewed appreciation by its owners.   In Middleport NY, the group was scheduled to divide in half and conquer = two small churches simultaneously. Somehow, we managed to arrive in town slightly more than a full hour before the events there were to begin. I still don't know how this happened (as, in my experience, these = conventions usually tend to get off schedule in the "late" direction...!) but it did. Most fortunately, the two churches were a couple blocks down the pleasant Main Street of Middleport from where the Erie Canal passes = through town. Main Street crosses the canal at an interesting ca.1912 mechanical liftbridge at this point, and we had (quite accidentally) arrived just in time to see it in operation several times. The Bridgetenders were = probably caught a bit off their guard by our group of a couple hundred folks with cameras descending on them all at once, but were very hospitable once they realized what was going on, even to the point of opening the access = hatches so we could see and take pictures of the bridge "works". In the end, everybody got to their recitals on time, and we were back on our schedule.   The final convention recital by Ken Cowan, at St. Joseph R.C. Cathedral, where he played the E. & G.G. Hook & Hastings organ, built originally in 1876 for the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia and recently rebuilt by the Andover Organ Company. Along with a fine performance which well = showed the beauty of this magnificent instrument, we also sang the hymn "Dear = Lord and Father of Mankind". Like our first hymn of the convention, this = seemed a perfect match to the group and to the (now very different, of course) mood of the moment. Again, we outdid ourselves in glorious song. I'm not sure there was a dry eye in the house when we finished...the people behind me (local folks, not with the convention group) were most certainly impressed!! It is always fun to see the reactions of parishoners (or = other guests) when they hear what our large group of organ music nuts can do = when given the chance to sing our hearts out...this time, though we didn't get to amaze them with four part harmony, we used group dynamics following the text (and Ken's lead at the console) instead...! <lol>   Well, I said I'd try to be brief, and I guess I already sorta missed that goal. I'll close this now, and leave the rest for Malcolm and/or anyone else to continue. There was indeed a great deal more which took place....!!!   Tim Bovard Little Rock (who is starting to get caught up with missed sleep!)    
(back) Subject: Re: August 15th From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 11:04:42 -0400   At 03:38 PM 7/24/2004, John Foss wrote: >August 15th is the departure of The Mayflower from Southampton on its way >to Plymouth to collect the Pilgrim Fathers, from where it continued on >September 6th on its voyage to found the British Colony in what as now = know >as the United States of America. That's why we all speak English.     Oh do we? You could have fooled me!   I speak English, my American friends speak American! As Professor Higgins =   tells us in "My Fair Lady", - "In America they haven;t used it for years"   I have American, and it's sibling, Canadian, as a second language!   Ducking for cover,   Bob Conway     If it ain't broke, keep fixing it 'til it is -- Geek Handbook    
(back) Subject: languages From: "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 08:11:13 -0700   Of late, we Americans have had to learn a second (or third) language:   Parseltongue, as spoken by a certain reptilian species of politician.   Bud      
(back) Subject: August 15 From: "Bernadette Wagner" <musicalgrl90@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 08:19:32 -0700 (PDT)   Oh my gosh. If someone really does do something from "Sister Act" I will = laugh my butt off. HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! I dare someone to do it. lol. ~a young organist who loves you   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Read only the mail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard.
(back) Subject: Re: August 15th From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 10:54:00 -0500   Wow, I didn't know all of those historic things that happened on August 15. But I did know that it was called the Dormition. The last time the feast fell on a Sunday, I was in my teens and we were still going to Mass at 8:00 on Sunday morning. A few minutes after 8:00 everyone was starting to get antsy, then finally the organist announced the first hymn and Father came down the aisle with a sheepish look on his face. Later he announced that the Feast of the Dormition had prompted him to sleep until someone came to wake him up ;-)   Alicia Zeilenga       -----Original Message----- From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 12:38:24 -0700 Subject: August 15th   > In Greece this day is known as the Dormition of the Virgin Mary - > literally > falling asleep. It is a major religious festival and a public holiday > on a > par with Christmas. Some interesting people and events associated with > August 15th are the departure of The Mayflower from Southampton on its > way > to Plymouth to collect the Pilgrim Fathers, from where it continued on > September 6th on its voyage to found the British Colony in what as now > know > as the United States of America. That's why we all speak English. > Napoleon > Bonaparte was born on this day in 1769, as was Leon Theremin in 1896, > inventor of the eponymous instrument and played by theremin virtuoso > and > list member, Charlie Lester. Is there any music for organ and theremin? > Oscar Peterson was also born on this day in 1925 - brilliant pianist > but no > known organ recordings - and the Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace in > Honolulu, > Hawaii, was dedicated in 1843, making it the oldest RC Cathedral in > continuous use in the United States. I am sure some one can come up > with > something suitable to play on this occasion! > John Foss > http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >      
(back) Subject: Re: languages From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 12:32:13 -0400   At 11:11 AM 7/24/2004, Bud wrote: >Of late, we Americans have had to learn a second (or third) language: > >Parseltongue, as spoken by a certain reptilian species of politician.   Now I wonder who that might be?   Bob    
(back) Subject: Re: Attitude (and Organists) From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 12:44:00 EDT   Jeff, I agree with you. (no flame) I was playing for churches at least 15 =   years before receiving a music degree. However, I do not think my playing =   became better overnight after receiving it. I felt at the age of 4 that I = was going to be a church organist, and that has been the only stable thread in = my life. And, because I have degrees (one in Special Education) and teaching =   certificates, I am not too good to play any type of music asked of me = where I am organist. (Or asked not to play, as it was in one case when a pastor = asked me not to play anything he didn't know). When I was taking lessons and going to college, organists were supposed to play classical (?) organ repertoire = every Sunday, no Tremulant on the solo stops, no gospel or popular-sounding = music. I was told the organist was just as important as the pastor and should act = as such. However, we are all there for the same purpose - to glorify God. = Us older organists are having a hard time adjusting to the contemporary "Praise and =   Worship" style of services, but if we are called of God to be in that = church, that is what we play. Our church does not have a Praise Band, but we do = use some of the "contemporary" music (mostly copyrighted in the 70's to 90's) = and I find it fun to improvise on some of the tunes. The congregation likes = what they know and understand. Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: SHEA'S PROGRAM Re: OHS ??? From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 13:00:41 EDT   We are members of the Theater Organ Guild in Ft. Worth and attend concerts = at Wichita, KS where they have the Wurlitzer that came out of a theater in = NY. This year we also went to Miami, OK, to hear Ron Larson on their Theater Organ. It was also a celebration of getting back into the old music hall = and the entire town was there. We go back to Wichita in October. This is special = to me, as our first "real" date was to one of these Theater Organ concerts, = after meeting at Felix's Oklahoma City concert. (As if everyone didn't know = that) Lee  
(back) Subject: the POINT about Schein, Scheidemann, Scheidt, Titelouze, etc. From: "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 10:37:02 -0700   One can play them in a boring, "academic" manner; or one can play them in a sparkling, exciting manner.   I have heard both.   I never cared for Sweelinck's variations on "Mein junges Leben hat ein End" until I heard a GOOD organist play them with historically informed registrations and articulation.   Titelouze in particular doesn't yield much as it appears on the printed page. It requires a good deal of study to get the ornamentation, inegale, and registration correct.   It took me the better part of a semester to get it to sound like MUSIC.   If you want to learn the freedom necessary to play Couperin on the ORGAN, go learn some of the HARPSICHORD works. They're WILD! (grin)   Frescobaldi ... again, not much excitement on the printed page ... but with proper articulation, rubato (!), and registration (insofar as that's POSSIBLE on American organs) it comes alive.   I never played much Messiaen in church, but one Maundy Thursday when I played Le Banque Celeste, my Anglican congregation "got it", right down to the drops of blood in the pedals.   It is JUST as as foolish and unprofessional to ignore everything BEFORE 1750 as it is to ignore everything AFTER 1750 (as we tended to do when I was in conservatory in the 1960s). I had to learn most of the 19th century organ music on my own, but I learned it, and played it.   But playing big "trashy-crashy" 19th century toccatas EVERY Sunday is like serving overly-sweet cream-filled pastries at every meal.   We have 500-600 years of organ literature to draw upon ... no one century is sanctified; nor is any one century to be automatically dismissed because it doesn't raise the heart rate and bring tears to the eyes at first hearing.   MAKING MUSIC is the bottom line, NOT what century a piece happens to come from.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Re: the POINT about Schein, Scheidemann, Scheidt, Titelouze, etc. From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 13:04:46 -0500   Right you are Bud. Sweelinck, Scheidemann, Bohm, Bruhns ... GREAT organ music! With patient study, a good understanding of early keyboard technique, the instruments of the period, along with a dose of genuine creativity, and this music music comes to life. Besides, having an understanding of 16th and 17th century literature certainly promotes excellence in the performance Baroque AND Romantic music IMHO.   Cheers,   Tim