PipeChat Digest #4651 - Tuesday, July 27, 2004
 
Re: Early age organist
  by <Icedad@aol.com>
Re: Starting ages as organist
  by "Travis L. Evans" <tlevans95@charter.net>
RE: Starting ages as organist
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Organist hymbooks
  by "Peter Harrison" <peter@phmusic.co.uk>
RE: Organist hymbooks
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Early age organist From: <Icedad@aol.com> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 00:31:54 EDT   Greetings,   I was 10 when I started playing the organ at St. Pius V Catholic = Church, McKeesport, Pa. I studied piano at the convent with one of the Sisters of = Mercy who staffed the school and one day she took me up to the choir loft to = learn about the pipe organ. She sat me down and began to show me the workings of = the pipe organ. Sister began giving me lessons from the Liturgical Organist , Book 1 by Carlo Rossini and then we progressed to the Stainer Organ = Method and also the Dickinson Method. I was so excited when I began the Bach "Eight = Little Preludes and Fugues" . The power of the instrument completely won me over. = Sister also gave me lessons on the Mass Chants Within 2 months or so, I = began playing and singing the early morning Requiem Masses with Sister at my = side. Within 6 months I was on my own, playing and singing Mass. Then a year = later in 1964 the Catholic Church dropped Latin for the Vernacular. I continued = to play the morning Masses, but now the chant was in English.I also began accompanying the choir and playing the few hymns that the congregation = were beginning to learn. I loved every minute of playing the pipe organ. I knew at this = early age that I wanted to be a church musician. The original organ I played on = was a great old Estey. It went through several rebuilds by various companies = over the years and still is well maintained. My parents and many family still belong to St. Pius including my 101 year old Grandmother. My = great-grandparents were founding members. I played there until I graduated from high school = and went on to college.When home visiting for the holidays from school, I = always played a Mass or two. Those were the days!!   Peace,   Daniel Weimer Minister of Music Our Lady of Hope Catholic Church Port Orange, Florida  
(back) Subject: Re: Starting ages as organist From: "Travis L. Evans" <tlevans95@charter.net> Date: Mon, 26 Jul 2004 23:41:13 -0500   You'rs truly at my first organ at the tender age of 3, with our big Lowry Theatre organ in the back ground.     http://webpages.charter.net/tlevans95/page1.html      
(back) Subject: RE: Starting ages as organist From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 19:17:41 +1200   >I started organs lessons at 5 on a Lowery Holiday Duo.=A0 By the time I = was 7 I was playing for primary (1st,2nd,3rd grades) school masses at my = school.=A0 By the time I was in the 8th grade I was playing all school masses and 4 = on weekends.=A0 By te time I graduated high school I was playing all masses = (2 Saturday night, 5 Sunday morning and 2 Sunday evening) and directing the elementary school choir and the adult choir.=20   This has been an interesting thread. Me? I had a few years piano lessons = in primary school. Gave that up for several years more. At the age of 17 I = was "converted" to the organ and had, over a year later, 36 lessons only, = back in 1960/1961. I've never sat an organ exam, and had no lessons since. My first organ job was playing a foul Conn Spinet. My second organ job was playing an awful C3 Hammond. My third organ job was Assistant Organist = at Wellington Cathedral.   No, there's no deep meaning in this. It's just the way it happened, = that's all. :-)   Ross        
(back) Subject: RE: Organist hymbooks From: "Peter Harrison" <peter@phmusic.co.uk> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 08:25:41 +0100   One of the requirements raised in the recent discussion was for the book = to lie flat on the music desk, hence to be spiral bound or in a ring binder.   I'd like to suggest that this is not the only answer with an alternative being to use conventionally stitched/bound books but to ensure they have = had at least 40 years prior use so remain on the page where they are opened. Naturally this avoids any temptation for irrelevant contemporary material = to be included in services. When new books are required they can be rapidly aged if vigorously flung at choirboys on a regular basis to keep their attention during practices.   .... Excuse me - must go... I think that's the police at my front door....     Peter M Harrison Emmanuel Church : Holcombe : Lancs, GB & P H M : P O Box 383 : Bury : BL8 4WX : GB tel 07799 62 1954 / 01204 887161 web: www.phmusic.co.uk    
(back) Subject: RE: Organist hymbooks From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 20:03:15 +1200     >I'd like to suggest that this is not the only answer with an alternative being to use conventionally stitched/bound books but to ensure they have = had at least 40 years prior use so remain on the page where they are opened. Naturally this avoids any temptation for irrelevant contemporary material = to be included in services. When new books are required they can be rapidly aged if vigorously flung at choirboys on a regular basis to keep their attention during practices.   Another thing you can if you don't like a particular hymnbook is to cut a bit off one leg of the organ stool. If you judge the piece accurately, the hated hymnbook will be just the right height to prop up the stool so you = can play for the service.   Ross