PipeChat Digest #4652 - Tuesday, July 27, 2004
 
Acoustics
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: Starting ages as organist
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Re: Starting ages as organist
  by <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
POE and POE+ (was youngest on the List)
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Re: Organist hymbooks
  by "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: the real world
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
RE: the real world
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Acoustics
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Tubular Pneumatic Action
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Simon Gutteridge and His Toccata
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
OHS convention organ review 03
  by "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net>
Re: Tubular Pneumatic Action
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: felix unsubscribe etc
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
Re: felix unsubscribe etc
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Re: felix unsubscribe etc
  by "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net>
Re:  Starting age as organist.
  by "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Acoustics From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Mon, 26 Jul 2004 11:36:50 -0500   There is strangeness all around us...and while UK and European members of this list may find our large organs questionable...if they only knew the true state of things over here.   It is rather bizarre to have to deal with church buildings that are designed solely for personal comfort,   The acoustical design of many of these buildings is intended to not permit reflection or even dispersion of sound...rather a "dead" room is the palette for the sound engineer to create what he thinks the sound should be. As a result, musicians with years of training are working at the will of a techie who often knows little or nothing about music.   When musicians complain that they cannot hear what they are doing, they are given a monitor speaker so they can hear, blocking them from hearing what is really going on.   Now the pendulum is swinging in a rather strange way.   (The following is not a sales pitch, but an insight into modern worship)   With more than 3,300 Rodgers Organs with Pipes installed worldwide, and the odd acoustic situation we find ourselves in, Rodgers has included an Ambiance System called RSS in the organs being built so that the digital stops may fill the room with sound, even rooms that possess rather unfriendly acoustics. As I understand it RSS was created by Roland, parent company of Rodgers, for use in outdoor concert venues by symphony orchestras.   Anyhow, when using pipes what happens? Microphones may be placed in and about the pipe array to give the RSS a signal that can be included in the sound field.   Insight: I just completed an organ design in which microphones were suspended over the choir in a very contemporary music format service. The signal from these microphones we directed into the RSS in the Rodgers Organ...now the sound of the choir wraps around the congregation without being loudly forced at them. The music director is thrilled, the choir sings better, also being wrapped in their own sound.   Of course, in a well-designed church utilizing hard, reflective surfaces and without the creature comforts many have come to demand of their churches, this would not be necessary. Smaller organs, as are common in many UK and European, would serve admirably as well.     noel jones, aago moderator, Rodgers Organ Users Group www.frogmusic.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Starting ages as organist From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 05:56:10 EDT   >No, there's no deep meaning in this. It's just the way it happened, = that's >all. :-)   No, but it is interesting. Thanks to whoever it was that did get the = topic rolling. Bernadette and Lee, I think... It's encouraging to see that a = few of the listmembers are young...that's the future of our instrument. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Re: Starting ages as organist From: <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 12:58:18 +0200   I think this has been published before, whatever topic it was. I don't recall. After several privat e requests, to repeat the info within this "rolling" topic, here are the facts again,   FELIX HELL, the early steps:   Jan 27, 1993: first piano lesson. Age: 7 Sep 22, 1993: first organ lesson. Age: 8 Feb 06, 1994: first competition. First Prize (Organ Literature). Age: 8 Mar 06, 1994: first Solo performance. Age: 8 Apr 08, 1994: first full service (RC High Mass on Easter). Age: 8   August 31, 1994: first solo concert abroad. Age: 9 (almost) Dec 16, 1995: German Service Playing Certificate' s exam ("Kirchenmusiker D"). Age: 10 When he moved to the USA in September 1999, shortly before his 14th birthday, enrolling at Juilliard, he had already more than 200 services as liturgical organist under his belt. The rest is history, known probably to most of the list.   For more details please look at Felix's website (www.felix-hell.com), or contact me privately.   Hans-Friedrich Hell -----Original Message----- Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 11:56:10 +0200 Subject: Re: Starting ages as organist From: RMB10@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org   No, but it is interesting. Thanks to whoever it was that did get the topic rolling. Bernadette and Lee, I think... It's encouraging to see that a few of the listmembers are young...that's the future of our instrument.   Monty Bennett   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: POE and POE+ (was youngest on the List) From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 08:02:50 EDT   Good morning, Y'all!   I hope Bernie and Gregory and all youth members of Pipechat are a part of = the more-than-wonderful Pipe Organ Encounters summer program of the AGO. Also, =   the POE+ program for adults is a very fine way for adult beginners to gain = skill and confidence in a similar, week-long away-from-home experience.   I hope everyone on the chat lists (both PIPORG-L and Pipechat) gives full support for these two wonderful programs!   Have a great day.   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea Nashville, TN  
(back) Subject: Re: Organist hymbooks From: "Raymond H. Clark" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 05:07:40 -0700   I was blessed, TRULY blessed, to spend my ENTIRE career of fifty years using probably the best hymnal ever produced in the USA: The Episcopal Hymnal 1940. True, as time wore on, we had to supplement it from time to time from its parent book, the venerable English Hymnal of 1906. But it is still serving hundreds of congregations who rejected the vastly inferior Hymnal 1982 out of hand. Hard to read, full of proofreading mistakes (both text AND music), poorly organized, it is but a pale shadow of its towering predecessor.   Now we have a Women's Hymnal, an African-American Hymnal, a Spanish Hymnal, etc. etc. etc. ... the idea of "unus cultus, unus cantus" has disappeared along with "lex orandi, lex credendi" and the 500-year-old services that united us as a church ... replaced by the "two from column A, two from column B" liturgies of the 1979 whatever-it-is ... it is certainly NOT The Book of Common Prayer.   But I digress (grin) ...   Cheers,   Bud   Peter Harrison wrote:   > One of the requirements raised in the recent discussion was for the book = to > lie flat on the music desk, hence to be spiral bound or in a ring = binder. > > I'd like to suggest that this is not the only answer with an alternative > being to use conventionally stitched/bound books but to ensure they have = had > at least 40 years prior use so remain on the page where they are opened. > Naturally this avoids any temptation for irrelevant contemporary = material to > be included in services. When new books are required they can be rapidly > aged if vigorously flung at choirboys on a regular basis to keep their > attention during practices. > > ... Excuse me - must go... I think that's the police at my front = door.... > > > Peter M Harrison > Emmanuel Church : Holcombe : Lancs, GB > & P H M : P O Box 383 : Bury : BL8 4WX : GB > tel 07799 62 1954 / 01204 887161 > web: www.phmusic.co.uk > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: RE: the real world From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 08:09:23 -0400   >From Bud: The Board of Deacons does NOT expect ANY of the above work NOT = to cost >money ... the days when members of the church were allowed to do things >like that for free are pretty much over, on account of building codes >and liability insurance, UNLESS they are licensed roofers, plumbers, >electricians, contractors, builders, etc.   >But when it comes to the MUSIC, which after the preaching IS the heart >and soul of a Baptist (or just about any OTHER service) ... "oh no, we >don't pay our musicians; that's a SIN! They should DONATE their services >to the glory of God!"   I can certainly see both sides of this issue. Due partly to my own = choices, I think it's unlikely that over a lifetime I'll recoup my (and my = parents') monetary investment in my musical education and accessory expenses. I, = too, strongly feel church musicians' work is often undervalued (at least in a monetary sense) and underpaid. And I agree that no church should *expect* = a professional musician to work for free.   At the small church where I'm employed, most of the members make = substantial financial contributions. They also volunteer for the secretarial, = janitorial and grounds care duties. Although the congregation is currently involved = in calling a new pastor, right now the interim pastor isn't responsible for much beyond Sunday morning duties. Members handle all the administrative work required on behalf of the congregation as well. In a word, volunteers do everything they possibly can.   Bud, I think in the real world there are many congregations in this situation, and many which are much worse off--this being a church in a comfortably middle class suburb with enthusiastic commitment from its members and with real potential for growth. And certainly struggling congregations can close their doors or merge, but this is often seen as--rightfully--a final, drastic resort.   I must respectfully disagree with your sentiment that "Any church that can afford even a PART-TIME *preacher* can afford to pay a part-time ORGANIST. Or let them GO without. If they value music and musicians so little, they don't NEED music in the FIRST place." I think there are probably lots of churches which cannot afford much more than that preacher. To my mind = saying they should go without music even if there's a member who can volunteer is just not a viable, real-world solution.   What do you think about the notion of a congregation paying a member (or committed nonmember, for that matter) to play, and the member then = donating back most or all of their stipend?   Emily A.              
(back) Subject: RE: the real world From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 07:26:15 -0500   At 07:09 AM 7/27/2004, you wrote: >But when it comes to the MUSIC, which after the preaching IS the heart > >and soul of a Baptist (or just about any OTHER service) ... "oh no, we > >don't pay our musicians; that's a SIN! They should DONATE their = services > >to the glory of God!"   Does the pastor also donate his services? Using this logic I would expect it to be a sin to pay for preaching. I do remember recently a post recommending = that an organist not play at their home church primarily due to this kind of fuzzy =   thinking. We have church members being paid for custodian and janitorial duties and grounds keeping. Obviously these things do not contribute to the greater = glory of God. A paid vocalist....horror of horrors.   Jon        
(back) Subject: Re: Acoustics From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 05:33:33 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Of course we understand the true state of things!   It's just that we called them cinemas, and you called them churches!!   We had two men called Robert Hope-Jones and John Compton.   :-0   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- noel jones <gedeckt@usit.net> wrote: > There is strangeness all around us...and while UK > and European members > of this list may find our large organs > questionable...if they only knew > the true state of things over here. > > It is rather bizarre to have to deal with church > buildings that are > designed solely for personal comfort, >       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - 100MB free storage! http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Re: Tubular Pneumatic Action From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 08:43:33 -0400   Dear Daniel and List,   As Bud has mentioned, the remarkable Eton College 19th Century Hill = Organ was restored by our company with the Tubular Pneumatic action = retained. New lead tubing was required. Please do take a look at this = URL, if for no other reason than to see the astonishing case!=20 http://www.mander-organs.com/html/eton_college_chapel.html Not on our Website is the J. W. Walker Organ in Bristol Cathedral. This = was rebuilt retaining the excellent tubular pneumatic action. I have = played it, and found the action without limitations, and, in fact, it = feels very good in the playing, and is responsive without limitations.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com =20   ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Daniel Hancock=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Monday, July 26, 2004 2:19 PM Subject: Tubular Pneumatic Action     Hello List.       I've recently had cause to inquire into the workings of = tubular-pneumatic organ actions and have heard about a supposed = unreliability in instruments with these actions. Is it typical to = experience dead notes and ciphers in such actions? Are actions = restorable to any degree of reliability?       Do any of you know of T-P organs that are either functioning reliably = in original or restored condition? If any of you have or can point me = to diagrams of these actions, I would be grateful       I have a small tubular pneumatic organ at my disposal, 1910 A.B = Felgemaker opus 1067 of 11 ranks and two manuals/pedal with a pretty = standard disposition for that time. I'm looking in to finding a home = for it, but it may have to be stored for some time. Is it worth my = while to restore the tubular pneumatic action, or will it ever be = reliable? If so, should the lead tubes be kept (or can they even) or = replaced with rubber or plastic.       Any help on this topic is sought after. I have a rather elementary = period diagram of such an action, and would be happy to share it with = interested parties.       Daniel       Timothy Daniel Hancock       Dean, American Guild of Organists, Springfield Chapter   Organist, Grace United Methodist Church   Assistant Organist, St. Agnes Cathedral Church       847 South Weller Avenue   Springfield, Missouri 65802   417.862.6272 or dhancock@brpae.com       http://www.agohq.org/chapters/springfieldmo      
(back) Subject: Simon Gutteridge and His Toccata From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 09:04:03 -0400   Hi John and John and List,   Some years ago, Simon and I were in London's St. Marylebone Church, near = the Royal Academy of Music. Simon was improvising a toccata in the style of Vierne. Unidentified Somewhat Famous Organist entered the church, = listening closely, and then inquired of me what was being played. I said: "Oh, = haven't you heard this yet? It is the Finale from the newly-discovered Vierne symphony." Somewhat Famous Organist uttered some British equivalent of "Wow!," and intensely respectfully, listed to the remainder of the piece, and then began intense questioning of Simon concerning how one acquired a copy of the score, etc. He, being the master of the vague managed somehow = to satisfy Somewhat Famous Organist without actually giving out any information. I believe Simon could have had a political career in the U. = S.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, July 26, 2004 3:54 PM Subject: Re: Organs and Organists online update     > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, July 26, 2004 1:05 PM > Subject: Organs and Organists online update > > > > Following the recent discussion on improvisation, I have added a "Toccata" > > in the French style improvised by Simon Gutteridge at St. Paul's, = Covent > > garden at the end of a Sunday service in January this year. Simon has > > visited the US on a recital tour under the auspices of Malcolm = Wechsler. > > This is recorded on an 1861 3 manual 28 stop tracker instrument by > > Bevington - no aids to registration. > > I have met Simon Gutteridge at a couple of OHS Conventions in the past, and > can vouch > for the fact that he is an extremely nice chap as well as an excellent > organist. He is also > extremely lucky in having in St. Paul's , Covent Garden one of the = finest > organs in London, > notwithstanding that it was built in 1861 and has four composition = pedals as > the only aid > to registration. His improvised Toccata on the website sounds stunning, > worthy of Marcel > Dupr=E9! > > John Speller > >      
(back) Subject: OHS convention organ review 03 From: "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 09:21:34 -0400   On evening of friday July 16th I finally had the chance to listen to an E. Skinner organ live in Central Prk UMC, played by Thomas Murray. As most organ people know, original conserved organs by Mr. Skinner are hard to find, but fascinating instruments for the Late Symphonic Organ lover. A look at the stop list says very little to somebody who doesn't know about Mr Skinner's tonal concept. We see a lot of 8', some 4', a low pitched mixture and some very solid 16'. However, these organs have tonal brilliance: Reeds and strings are designed for that. This brilliance, of course, is very different from later, organ reform oriented instruments' upperwork. Ernest Skinner organs are the ultimate symphonic instruments and come very close to the Orchestral Organ. The recital program was adapted to this, excepting the Introduction and Passacaglia in d by Max Reger... unlike *Aeolian*- Skinner, these organs are definitely NOT suited for Reger's big organ works; the small works Op 56 and Op 80 would fit better to them.   After six recitals, two of them with a heavy program in a crowded church without Air Condition I was done, and my only wish was to get out and breathe some fresh air! - I still owe my shakehands to Thomas since I saw him several times in the following days but always from far away and surrounded by other people. I reccomend everybody to go to Tom's = recitals, it's really worth.   Saturday July 17th, third full day at the convention, started with exactly the opposite of the E. Skinner organ: A huge 1954 Schlicker in Trinity Episcopal Church with lots of upperwork and a typical neobarroque tonal conception. What a difference in relation to Mr. Schlicker's Op 02 / = 1932in St Francis Xavier! More than anything else this illustrates the radical changes in tonal conception which happened in scarcely 20 years (keeping = in mind that US-american organ firms were handicapped for 6 years due to WWII events it's even less).   The next organ, Kimball Op 3329 (1903) in St Louis RCC again showed an astoundingly eclectic instrument to us (astoundingly given the = construction year), and once again I apologized silently for my former prejudice regarding Kimball. As I pointed out in part 02, Kimball made astounding things and their organs were of astounding quality (OB Charles Kegg told amazing facts about this in his lecture). St Louis RCC has over-accoustics, and this was the only (but slight) handicap to the excel;lent program: Quick passages blurred. But french cathedrals have exaclty the same problem...   Holy Trinity LC was our next station. It houses an enormous organ, distributed throughout the entire church, with a console that reminds strongly Riverside's in NYC. The tonal concept is very well done, the church's accoustics is great, but honestly I felt like sitting in an organ chamber there. My readers can do their own interpretations... I like organ chambers, they are my workplace :), and Kegg OB did their best to build a great intrument.   A nice organ was Jordan River Missionary Baptist Church's Votteler-Holtkamp-Sparling Op 1343 from 1919. Here we appreciated the = first example of small ex-stock early 20th cty church organ for small town churches, many of them sold by catalog, therefore fast to get, at affordable prices, sturdy as the contemporary "Tin Lizzy" and equal reliable. I PLEAD for such instruments in our present days to beat imitations, although their tonal concept should be different and match our present times, of course. In the following days we could appreciate more of these instruments who share a common problem however: an annoying trend for wind-fluttering. If this problem is inherent to a reservoir / wind system design trouble or to later on adapted blowers I couldn't tell since I had no time for a closer examination.   Back in the Hotel I devoted some time to a close study of St Paul's Cathedral (Episcopal) organ's history and specification. Oh my, I thought: mostly recycled and often modified pipework from the most diverese origins one could imagine. In my native country those compounders are mostly = lemons and a lifelong maintenance nightmare in every sense. The more I was positively impressed when I listened to the organ at the Choral evensong and recital. Here is shown that pipe recycling IS = possible, given a high criteria, close study and very skilled tonal finish. Despite its multiple origins the pipework forms a homogeneous ensamble. I liked this organ so much that the next day I went straight to the episcopal service, missing half of the lecture about the WurliTzer Organ by Jeff Weler- it doesn't matter however since Jeff announced that the book about this interesting topic will be ready on time to be laid under the = Christmas Tree. I surely hope to a) get a christmas tree this year, and b) find the book underneath! :)- Out of this topic, it was the first time for me that I attended episcopal rites in an episcopal High Church. We have an episcopal church in Caracas, but they are only a very small congregation with an old hammond- you figure out, although they do their best and are very commited to ecumenism.   With this remark I come to the end of the 3rd Convention day. Stay = tuned...   Andres First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet, and the cat got something to wonder about.            
(back) Subject: Re: Tubular Pneumatic Action From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 08:49:59 -0500     Tubular-pneumatic action at its best works extremely well and reliably and results in surprisingly few ciphers from dirt in the magnets <g>. It has, however, with good reason been less popular in the United States than in England, and one reason for this is that inferior designs have tended to = be used in the USA. Mention only need be made of the horrors of Moller's = awful bar-and-membrane tubular action (although the handful of Moller pitman tubulars that were built were very fine), and of Steere's use of Carl Weigle's patent membrane chest. Indeed, this is not limited to Steere and one of the problems was that American builders tended to favor inferior German designs over superior British ones. Another particular problem is that the American climate tends to be more extreme than the British one, = and it is difficult to design suitable blead holes to cope with the extremes = of temperature and humidity found here. Estey had as good a solution as = anyone for this, using blead holes in stable brass inserts similar to machine = screw inserts. On the spectrum of good and bad, I would say Felgemaker was somewhere in the middle, perhaps tending toward the good. If it has = worked reliably for nearly a century it might well be worth restoring as is.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: felix unsubscribe etc From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 10:01:01 -0400   Come now. All this speculation.   The boy is probably in the throes of MOVING from his Philadelphia digs, = since he's graduated from Curtis.   When he has his computer set up again, perhaps he'll resub.   --Shirley        
(back) Subject: Re: felix unsubscribe etc From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 07:08:45 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   How do we "know" anything?   Look at the evidence.....   Young organist graduates, vanishes from home, turns up in the Bavarian Alps ("The Hell's are alive with the sound of music") and, above all, cuts himself off from all possible contact.   I think we have the makings of a mystery novel here!!   Isn't imagination a wonderful thing?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Shirley <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> wrote: > Come now. All this speculation. > > The boy is probably in the throes of MOVING from his > Philadelphia digs, since > he's graduated from Curtis. >       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - Send 10MB messages! http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Re: Re: felix unsubscribe etc From: "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 10:09:00 -0400   No cause to worry about, folks. I just got a note from Felix' father about my OHS organ reviews, so they are here with us. Now it's ME who is worried: Mr Hell didn't reveive review 01 and 02. = Didn't they arrive on pipechat?- I am working with a PC which has some tricks I = do not master yet.   Yours Andres ----------- Mensaje Original -------------- De: Shirley [pnst.shirley@verizon.net] Para: PipeChat [pipechat@pipechat.org] Cc: Asunto: Re: felix unsubscribe etc Fecha: 27/07/2004 10:01:19 Mensaje:   Come now. All this speculation.   The boy is probably in the throes of MOVING from his Philadelphia digs, since he's graduated from Curtis.   When he has his computer set up again, perhaps he'll resub.   --Shirley         ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: Re: Starting age as organist. From: "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 07:11:27 -0700 (PDT)   I prolly hold the record at the other end of the scale, starting playing organ in a church at the age of 40. I had spent my whole life as a tenor soloist, and just needed a new challenge. Friends were dying of aids, I was going through a bad patch in my teaching career, so it was either take up a huge challenge or go crazy. I ended up loving it and working very hard at it.   My earliest performance that anyone cares to remember was at the age of 3 when I got up in my little country church in Rising Sun, Indiana to sing a song. When I started to sing, I forgot the words, so I decided on the fly to substitute a song I knew well, so I sang: " I love little pussy, her fur is so warm, and if I don't hurt her she'll do me no harm. I'll sit by the fire and give her some food, and pussy will love me because I am good." The stunned look on the congregation's faces told me I was onto something. Back there, they probably still remember me as "That pussy boy."   Ken   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Kenneth Potter, Substitute Organist 845/358-2528 <swell_shades@yahoo.com>, 845/480-1416 cell =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D