PipeChat Digest #4541 - Monday, June 7, 2004
 
Re: Tamburini
  by "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
Re: Gee Golly Whiz
  by "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
Re: Sanfillipo Organ
  by "brade" <beveland@millsauto.com>
Re: Gee Golly Whiz
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
RE: Where is St. Hyacinth?
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Tamburini
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Tamburini
  by "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
Re: Tamburini
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
LONG RE: Tamburini
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <rgunther@cantv.net>
RE: Tamburini
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <rgunther@cantv.net>
Re: Tamburini
  by "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Tamburini
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Midi files
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: Tamburini
  by "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: UNT is off the hook!...whats with Northwestern?
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Tamburini From: "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 07:48:34 -0300   Dear List,   When I say 'action digital', I say digitalizing the console and relays, but maintaining entire pipework.   > digitalizing the console and relays -- might be a good idea, > I forgot to ask about the maintenance. The maintenance of this equipment type is not much more complicated? And, it is possible a organbuilder make a restauration project 'by photos" of the organ? Or, without to look personally the instrument? It is an absurd idea?   Domitila      
(back) Subject: Re: Gee Golly Whiz From: "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 04:10:09 -0700 (PDT)   With US Air, it has been my experience if I reserve tickets in advance (some years I've had to reserve three weeks in advance... other years two weeks in advance) that I have been able to purchase my tickets at a much lower price.... Oh yes, if you belong to AARP, US Air also give you a better price...   Best wishes to all,     Morton Belcher fellow list member.....   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D --- ProOrgo53@aol.com wrote: > Gee Golly Whiz if these events could JUST have been > advertised at least a > month in advance. > > Having the experience THIS summer that I cannot > leave work for a full week, > until this fall, but a three-day "get away" for a > day in Philly like June 12/13 > would have been magnifico if known about more in > advance. > > (Someone told me that airline tickets cost a lot > less if purchased several > weeks in advance. Is that not still true?) > > Dale Rider > Independence, MO >       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Friends. Fun. Try the all-new Yahoo! Messenger. http://messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Sanfillipo Organ From: "brade" <beveland@millsauto.com> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 08:11:02 -0500   I stayed in Kansas City briefly last year and had an organ tour from a friend. In the neighborhood where his church is located there are at = least three or four churches with these tower bells. The set at his church is still functioning every Sunday. There quite a sight to see when the = striker hits them. And the control box/timer is quite massive as are the chimes themselves.   The story goes that a man living in the neighborhood loved the sound of bells so much he bought a set for each church in the area so he could hear them on Sunday mornings. Now there's a nice guy.   Brad E I    
(back) Subject: Re: Gee Golly Whiz From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 09:15:42 -0400   There's been a price war at Philly International between US Air and the = new-to- Philly Southwest Airlines. Might be worth looking into as this is new in = the past few months.   --Shirley   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   > > > (Someone told me that airline tickets cost a lot > > less if purchased several > > weeks in advance. Is that not still true?)      
(back) Subject: RE: Where is St. Hyacinth? From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 09:22:43 -0400   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_1990662= =3D=3D.ALT Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii"; format=3Dflowed   At 12:15 AM 2004-06-07 -0400, you wrote:   >Its actually Ste. Hyacinthe, about 45 minutes drive south of Montreal.     Andrew,   Try "east" instead of "south". Follow route 20 from Montreal.   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263 --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_1990662= =3D=3D.ALT Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"us-ascii"   <html> <body> At 12:15 AM 2004-06-07 -0400, you wrote:<br><br> <blockquote type=3Dcite class=3Dcite cite><font face=3D"tahoma" size=3D2 = color=3D"#000080">Its actually Ste. Hyacinthe, about 45 minutes drive south of Montreal. </blockquote><br><br> Andrew,<br><br> Try &quot;east&quot; instead of &quot;south&quot;.&nbsp; Follow route 20 from Montreal.<br><br> Arie V.<br> <x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~<br> Arie Vandenberg<br> Classic Organbuilders<br> ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com<br> Tel.: 905-475-1263</font></body> </html>   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_1990662= =3D=3D.ALT--      
(back) Subject: Re: Tamburini From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 09:41:40 -0400   At 09:56 PM 2004-06-06 -0300, you wrote: >Hello, list. > >I need some help again. >About a organ restauration I have some questions. >In the University of Rio de Janeiro there are a Tamburini, 60 stops = (years >60), eletro pneumatic action. >The organ needs a great reform. He is full of termites in the console, >chests, etc), only to begin. >Organbuildering in Brazil is complicated thing. >The situation is: there are two projects about this reform. One is >Brazilian, and other, is french (a organbuilder was in Rio last year). >Both projects pretends to change the pneumatic eletro action to a digital =   >action. This is not good because there isn't a other point of view. > >First question: I'd like to hear some opinions about : >1) is a good idea to put in a organ the digital action system and is a >good idea to put this system in a Tamburini organ (if it is that that is >relevant)? >2) Have the organ with digital action lightest keys? >3) Is possible a organbuilder to make a project to reform a organ (and a >budget ) at the distance? How? In places where there are not = organbuilder >tradition, how are made the projects? >4) The Tamburini is closed. Someone knows if there are one company is >devoted to repairs of organs Tamburini? > >Well, I think it's all. >I thank you very much >Domitila > >Domitila,     I understand your problem, with a lack of good organbuilders in your country, lack of financial resources, and an organ that needs a lot of = help. I will try to answer your questions as best I can.   1) in North America, most new organs, and refurbishments as well, (if = they are not a Tracker), use a computer control system, which can also be = called a digital relay. What these relays do is reduce the amount of hardware, especially of the mechanical variety, and expand the versatility of the instrument. However it is critical to have these systems installed correctly, or various anomalies may occur. Generally they are trouble-free once installed, but it is important to have local, as well as =   manufacturer technical support. If something does go wrong, the = instrument could be in-operable.   2) should not affect the touch at all ( I suppose you mean keyboard and pedalboard action)   3) I don't think any builder would want to take on the job, without inspecting it first.   4) I don't know of any company that does maintenance or repairs on Tambounini organs.   Cheers,   Arie V.         >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263      
(back) Subject: Re: Tamburini From: "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 11:01:01 -0300   Dear Arie,   Thank you very much for your response. One last question: It is possible to change the eletric sistem for a mechanical action?   Domitila   Arie Vandenberg wrote:   > I will try to answer your questions as best I can. > > 1) in North America, most new organs, and refurbishments as well, (if > they are not a Tracker), use a computer control system, which can also > be called a digital relay. What these relays do is reduce the amount > of hardware, especially of the mechanical variety, and expand the > versatility of the instrument. However it is critical to have these > systems installed correctly, or various anomalies may occur. > Generally they are trouble-free once installed, but it is important to > have local, as well as manufacturer technical support. If something > does go wrong, the instrument could be in-operable. > > 2) should not affect the touch at all ( I suppose you mean keyboard > and pedalboard action) > > 3) I don't think any builder would want to take on the job, without > inspecting it first. > > 4) I don't know of any company that does maintenance or repairs on > Tambounini organs. > > Cheers, > > Arie V. > > > > >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ > Arie Vandenberg > Classic Organbuilders > ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com > Tel.: 905-475-1263 > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: Re: Tamburini From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 10:31:34 -0400   At 11:01 AM 2004-06-07 -0300, you wrote: >Dear Arie, > >Thank you very much for your response. >One last question: >It is possible to change the eletric sistem for a mechanical action? > >Domitila     Domitila,   I suppose it is possible to change the organ to mechanical action, but = that would mean keeping only the pipes, blower, reservoirs, etc. Since as you say the termites have got to the wood, that may not be such a bad idea.   However, that would be costly. Well built mechanical systems tend to be very expensive, but also last the longest.   I would say, that should only be considered, if the instrument had musical =   merit to begin with. If it were only a very average sounding organ, you may as well consider an entirely new instrument, even if it were smaller than the present one.   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263      
(back) Subject: LONG RE: Tamburini From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 11:23:45 -0400   Andres Gunther rgunther@cantv.net   Hi Domitila and List, A short primary [LOL] answer to this.   > The organ needs a great reform. He is full of termites in the console, > chests, etc), only to begin.   In short, rude terms: The organ has Terminal Cancer. It must be fully disassembled, finishes stripped off, and its wood parts soaked into a tank with liquid pestizide for 3 days to 1 week. This is known as "inmersion treatment". The pestizide's inert ingredient shouldn't be greasy or water based (naphta or benzene works best) and its active ingredient shouldn't corrode metals. This is a conditio sine qua = non. Since the wood fiber absorbs the pestizide, there is a *chance* that it = will be protected against a new attack for some years- until the active ingredient evaporates or decays. Then, the beasts will be back. Remember that even if the organ is treated its environment isn't. Exactly for this reason forget about a gas chamber or injections. They slow down the ill but don't elliminate it. After the treatment, the damage in the wood remains and must be filled out with acrylate, wood filler, mastix etc. Many pieces will be = so damaged that they must be made anew. Lots of work, and the results aren't very convincing.   Therefore, our old organ builder Kurt Schmeltzer forgot about treatments = and made anew the entire organ woodwork in Spanish Cedar and Mahogany when our Vegezzi-Bossis and Duarte-Albertis got the termites. It was more effective and less expensive at large. Honestly, I would reccomend that for your Tamburini. Brazil produces excellent tropical hardwoods! Make sure however that a) the wood is very well seasoned, and b) the organ builder makes = exact alike chests and pallet actions. The pipework was voiced by the factory to this particular chest type, and placing it on a tone channel-slider chest = or direct electric action for example would be no good at all!   > Both projects pretends to change the pneumatic eletro action to a > digital action. This is not good because there isn't a other point of view.   Indeed this is no good. Again: Pipes that were designed and voiced for EP chests must remain on EP chests of the same type and pallet lifting = action. As for digital driving systems in consoles, which substitute the former solenoid driven contact rails, I wrote several times why the idea wouldn't be good, and I beg pardon to all folks who manufacture digital driving components for EP organs, including sequencers. Our electric power supply is unstable and unreliable. Even with surge protectors, sophisticated digital systems can lose their settings (in the best case) or a delicate chip or = MP burns out (in the worst case). Other case: corrosion due to hot and humid environment. Result: Several hundred dollars (an often unavailable Fortune here!) down the drain; several months until the replacement part arrives from USA or Europe. Again in the worst case, it must be installed and programmed by a specialist who must come from abroad. Another fortune! I know that certain modern devices are much less susceptible, have = built-in surge protectors and corrosion preventing coatings, and are most easy to install even by laymen, but other problem remains: In a few years they = will be outdated and no spare parts available. Final result: a dead organ because there is no money for refurbishing. = Sorry that I am so hard and paint such a black scenario, but it's based on nasty experiences from the past.   For a new electro-mechanical driving system: Be sure that the new contact rails, moving parts and contacts are made from the best of the best only: Gold, or Platinum plated contacts and contact bars, stainless steel and nylon-teflon moving parts. Spark supression diodes on all solenoid coils = are an absolute must. "Heavy Duty Marine Use"-rated electrical components and products should be used in this particular case: Rio de Janeiro is placed aside the seashore and the climate there isn't only hot and humid- the air is salty!   > 1) is a good idea to put in a organ the digital action system and is a > good idea to put this system in a Tamburini organ (if it is that that is > relevant)?   It isn't.   > 2) Have the organ with digital action lightest keys?   My reccomendation: Request a "tracker touch" for the new console. It isn't the "real thing" but anyway better than a too light key touch.   > 3) Is possible a organbuilder to make a project to reform a organ (and a > budget ) at the distance?   No. The organ must be visited and througly inspected, and any seriously interested organ builder will demand that. *Several* opinions and budgets would be good to have in this case, IMHO. The folks who are = willing to sponsor the reconstruction proyect must "bite the bullet" and pay the costs, no matter if project and budget are finally accepted or not. Never rely on a tech who, having only a description of the organ and its failures, makes an average budget "from distance". Neither rely on a = builder who *insists* on funny relocation, enlargement and addition projects. Explain that new ideas are welcome but your budget is for a reconstruction as it is- no more (unless you really like the project, the plan has a sense... and you have the money!).   > In places where there are not > organbuilder tradition, how are made the projects?   Exactly this way, or at least, they should... :)- Good luck with the Tamburini!   Yours Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: RE: Tamburini From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 11:59:38 -0400   Andres Gunther rgunther@cantv.net   Hi,   Arie is right!   > Well built mechanical systems tend to be > very expensive, but also last the longest.   ....and are the easiest to repair for organ builders there, who in so many cases are little more than intelligent and skilled laymen with some cabinetmaking background. Two years ago I wrote a series of "Organ = Building in the Tropics" to another Organ List. I stated there that mech action should be primarily considered for new organ projects in tropical = countries. But the voicing problem of adapting pipes to a different chest type = remains in this particular case- specially the reeds... of course they can be revoiced, but this adds more costs to an already wickedly expensive = project.   Cheers Andres    
(back) Subject: Re: Tamburini From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 09:08:35 -0700       Domitila Ballesteros wrote:   > Dear Arie, > > Thank you very much for your response. > One last question: > It is possible to change the eletric sistem for a mechanical action? > > Domitila   Not unless the organ already has slider chests with electric pull-down action. If it doesn't, you're basically talking about putting the pipes on an all-new mechanism, which would come close to the cost of a new organ. In addition, pipes voiced to play on a pitman windchest would have to be revoiced to play on slider windchests.   Bud Clark San Diego California USA > > Arie Vandenberg wrote: > >> I will try to answer your questions as best I can. >> >> 1) in North America, most new organs, and refurbishments as well, (if >> they are not a Tracker), use a computer control system, which can also >> be called a digital relay. What these relays do is reduce the amount >> of hardware, especially of the mechanical variety, and expand the >> versatility of the instrument. However it is critical to have these >> systems installed correctly, or various anomalies may occur. >> Generally they are trouble-free once installed, but it is important to >> have local, as well as manufacturer technical support. If something >> does go wrong, the instrument could be in-operable. >> >> 2) should not affect the touch at all ( I suppose you mean keyboard >> and pedalboard action) >> >> 3) I don't think any builder would want to take on the job, without >> inspecting it first. >> >> 4) I don't know of any company that does maintenance or repairs on >> Tambounini organs. >> >> Cheers, >> >> Arie V. >> >> >> >> >>> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >>> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >>> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >>> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >>> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >>> Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >> >> >> >> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >> Arie Vandenberg >> Classic Organbuilders >> ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com >> Tel.: 905-475-1263 >> >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >> >> >> > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: RE: Tamburini From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 12:16:40 -0400   At 11:59 AM 2004-06-07 -0400, you wrote: >Andres Gunther >rgunther@cantv.net > >Hi, > >Arie is right! > > > Well built mechanical systems tend to be > > very expensive, but also last the longest. > >...and are the easiest to repair for organ builders there, who in so many >cases are little more than intelligent and skilled laymen with some >cabinetmaking background. Two years ago I wrote a series of "Organ = Building >in the Tropics" to another Organ List. I stated there that mech action >should be primarily considered for new organ projects in tropical = countries. >But the voicing problem of adapting pipes to a different chest type = remains >in this particular case- specially the reeds... of course they can be >revoiced, but this adds more costs to an already wickedly expensive = project. > >Cheers >Andres   Andres,   My ignorance shows here, but I will ask it anyways. I thought that the transition of pipes from E-P chests to slider was not near so drastic on organ pipe voicing, as say going from typical direct electric to slider. = I thought that as long as the wind pressure was relative, only minor voicing =   was required, and mostly the reeds, going from E-P to slider.   Maybe some other organ builders can enlighten us further.   Also, in a topical climate is a mechanical organ really reliable in the long term, especially with swelling due to humidity, salt in the air, termites etc.? Just asking.   Here in Canada, generally the newer tracker actioned organs are in climate =   controlled environments, and even then there are problems, so I would hate =   to think what happens in Brazil.   Cheers,   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263      
(back) Subject: Midi files From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 13:21:02 -0300   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0140_01C44C92.47FEBEB0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   does anyone here know where i might get some nice midi files of Organ = =3D music I got plenty Christian ones, but would like some classical ones=3D20   Daniel ------=3D_NextPart_000_0140_01C44C92.47FEBEB0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1400" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>&nbsp;does anyone here know where i = =3D might get some=3D20 nice midi files&nbsp; of Organ music</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I got plenty Christian ones, but = would =3D like some=3D20 classical ones </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Daniel</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0140_01C44C92.47FEBEB0--    
(back) Subject: Re: Tamburini From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 09:26:59 -0700   I would think that inert sliders and trackers of modern materials like Lexan and aluminum would HELP, but you're right ... even in Florida, tracker actions and slider chests DON'T like the hot, wet summers. But as Andres pointed out, they DO have some FABULOUS native hardwoods available in Brazil for building the chests themselves.   Still, all in all, tracker action and mechanical stop action would be more reliable than anything ELSE.   Cheers,   Bud Clark San Diego CA USA, where we have a LOT of problems with corrosion, being right next to the ocean   Arie Vandenberg wrote:   > At 11:59 AM 2004-06-07 -0400, you wrote: > >> Andres Gunther >> rgunther@cantv.net >> >> Hi, >> >> Arie is right! >> >> > Well built mechanical systems tend to be >> > very expensive, but also last the longest. >> >> ...and are the easiest to repair for organ builders there, who in so = many >> cases are little more than intelligent and skilled laymen with some >> cabinetmaking background. Two years ago I wrote a series of "Organ >> Building >> in the Tropics" to another Organ List. I stated there that mech action >> should be primarily considered for new organ projects in tropical >> countries. >> But the voicing problem of adapting pipes to a different chest type >> remains >> in this particular case- specially the reeds... of course they can be >> revoiced, but this adds more costs to an already wickedly expensive >> project. >> >> Cheers >> Andres > > > Andres, > > My ignorance shows here, but I will ask it anyways. I thought that the > transition of pipes from E-P chests to slider was not near so drastic on =   > organ pipe voicing, as say going from typical direct electric to > slider. I thought that as long as the wind pressure was relative, only > minor voicing was required, and mostly the reeds, going from E-P to = slider. > > Maybe some other organ builders can enlighten us further. > > Also, in a topical climate is a mechanical organ really reliable in the > long term, especially with swelling due to humidity, salt in the air, > termites etc.? Just asking. > > Here in Canada, generally the newer tracker actioned organs are in > climate controlled environments, and even then there are problems, so I > would hate to think what happens in Brazil. > > Cheers, > > Arie V. > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ > Arie Vandenberg > Classic Organbuilders > ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com > Tel.: 905-475-1263 > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: UNT is off the hook!...whats with Northwestern? From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 12:20:50 -0500   Yes - that is University of North Texas. I think she means again as in continuing - not again as in after a downturn. UNT obviously has one of the most thriving departments in the country. They are still supporting 3 organ faculty. They rebuilt and added to the Main Auditorium organ just a few years ago - They bought the Bedient last year (I know some of you HATE the sound - but for an academic setting and for learning French Classic lit, it is the next best thing to going to France) - and now they are building a new organ for Winspear Hall (the newest performance hall on campus.) And not too long ago they bought new harpsichords. I don't know how many majors there are now - but at least enough to keep both departments going and supported.   Margo   F. Richard Burt wrote: > Good Evening, Desiree: > > You wrote: > > > The Organ Dept at UNT is excelling again. > > Do you mean UNT, ...as in the University of > North Texas??? When did they stop excelling, > and now they can excell again? > > ...or are you still talking about Northwestern? > > Appreciatively, > F. Richard Burt > > > .     -- Dr. Margo Dillard Organist, FUMC, Lewisville, TX Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano & Organ Studio