PipeChat Digest #4543 - Monday, June 7, 2004
 
Re: digital "action"
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Patriotic suggestions
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Patriotic suggestions
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
RE: Patriotic suggestions
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
FYI -- Minister at Regan Library today (x-posted)
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Digital Action
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
Re: Digital Action
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Digital Action
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Patriotic suggestions
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net>
Re: Patriotic suggestions
  by "DVR" <DVRmusician@webtv.net>
Re: Patriotic suggestions
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Re: digital "action"
  by "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Digital Action
  by "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: digital "action" From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 15:51:38 -0400   At 12:32 PM 2004-06-07 -0700, you wrote: >"Digital" isn't really an ACTION ... "digital" (when applied to a PIPE >organ) simply means that housekeeping chores (stop action, combination >action, the connection between the keys and pipes, etc.) are CONTROLLED = by >a computer. It generally replaces electro-pneumatic or electro-mechanical =   >RELAYS; it doesn't have anything DIRECTLY to do with the action ITSELF. >You can apply digital technology to ANY electric-action organ. > >Inside the organ, there are still only a handful of ways of actually >making the organ PLAY: > >1. Tracker action >2. Barker lever (pneumatic assistance to what is still basically tracker >action) >3. Tubular pneumatic action >4. Electro-pneumatic action (can be applied to either slider or pitman = chests) >5. Electro-mechanical action (can be applied to either slider or pitman >chests. > >I personally am VERY wary of applying ANY digital technology to pipe >organs ... we had an instance locally where the original manufacturer of >the digital equipment had gone out of business; the organ needed repairs >to the stop and key action; replacement parts were unavailable; the whole =   >system had to be replaced at great expense. > >Think about the lifespan of the average computer ... I HAVE a twenty-year =   >old computer, and it still WORKS, but virtually EVERYTHING in it has been =   >replaced at one time or another. The technology is slow, and primitive. I =   >keep it only because it runs a mailing label program that suits my needs. > >In the USA, we had several organ builders in the 19th and early 20th >century that built "catalog" organs. They were shipped out by railroad to =   >remote places, along with instructions for assembling them ... the >instructions were nothing that a local blacksmith couldn't follow. Many = of >those organs are still playing today BECAUSE the mechanism IS simple, and =   >the replacement parts (wood, leather, etc.) are still generally = available. > >Tracker organs have been around for more than a thousand years; they = WORK; >they keep ON working; and when they DO have to be repaired, the repairs >are SIMPLE to DO. > >My second choice, though there are some issues about pipe speech, would = be >electro-mechanical action applied to slider chests. It's simple to build, =   >and simple to maintain. > >Electro-pneumatic actions and pitman chests are wonders of the early >Industrial Revolution, and a well-built one will last up to a hundred >years, but when it comes time to releather it, it's a NIGHTMARE (grin). > >Cheers, > >Bud Clark   Bud,   I would like to visit this thousand year old tracker you are talking = about.   In fact I would like to visit a 500 year old pipe organ that has NEVER = been worked on, other than basic maintenance and tuning.   It is true that most trackers have simple mechanisms, but still in general =   trackers get an overhaul every 50 to 75 years, assuming they are played much at all. Look at all those famous organs in Europe, especially in Holland, and they had restorations done 2 or 3 times during the 20th = century.   The newer electro-pneumatic chests and pitman chests are fairly easy to re-leather. Just drop the pouch boards shave off the leather, and put new =   ones on. The primary ones are a bigger job though.   The biggest problem with pipe organs, and this is what is causing a lot of =   churches to think twice about one, is not only the initial cost of one, = but the on going maintenance, and the cost of a periodic overhaul. Plus the cost of climate control. A lot of churches here in Canada just can no longer afford it. Heck, they can't even fix the leaky roof, 'caus they have already dipped into next years budget. Another problem here is the lack of organists. Churches just are not going to spend big bucks on an organ, if they can't get anyone to play it.   But that doesn't mean I don't think pipe organs are not worth it. Musically they are superior to digital instruments, or digital = pianos, or acoustic pianos for the traditional type of sacred music, and for playing the organ literature. It is just that the market for new instruments up here is so small, that it is discouraging.   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263      
(back) Subject: Re: Patriotic suggestions From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 16:06:32 -0400   Variations on "The Star Spangled Banner" by John Knowles Paine Charles Callahan has a nice three movement "Patriotic Suite". There's a Dudley Buck set of variations on the National Anthem. I own=20=   them but never learned them. Chuck Peery Cincinnati   On Jun 7, 2004, at 3:29 PM, brade wrote:   > Our city started a lunchtime concert series over the summer months=20 > that rotates through the instruments in town.=A0 This year I am = playing=20 > July 7.=A0 The choice of music is up to me and anything goes for this=20=   > series.=A0 I'm sticking with a more classical approach. > =A0 > I thought it would be fun to do at least one patriotic arrangement. > =A0 > Any suggestions? > =A0 > Brad Eveland > bradekc@yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Patriotic suggestions From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 15:14:43 -0500   Greetings:   May I suggest "Meditation and Variations on America" by Janet Linker.   It is well crafted and falls easily under the fingers.   Best wishes,   Tom Gregory -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569      
(back) Subject: RE: Patriotic suggestions From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 16:14:44 -0400   There's also Salute to the Armed Forces by Camp Kirkland from the Cantata "Sweet Land of Liberty". Excellent 4 part choral arrangement that adapts = to solo organ quite well   Tom Hoehn, Organist Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes, Ellenton, FL (substitute - 4/42 Wurlitzer) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL (4/9?- = Rodgers/Ruffati/Wicks) Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS/VotS-ATOS/DTOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Charles Peery > Sent: Monday, June 07, 2004 4:07 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: Patriotic suggestions > > > Variations on "The Star Spangled Banner" by John Knowles Paine > Charles Callahan has a nice three movement "Patriotic Suite". > There's a Dudley Buck set of variations on the National Anthem. I own > them but never learned them. > Chuck Peery > Cincinnati > > On Jun 7, 2004, at 3:29 PM, brade wrote: > > > Our city started a lunchtime concert series over the summer months > > that rotates through the instruments in town.=A0 This year I am = playing > > July 7.=A0 The choice of music is up to me and anything goes for this > > series.=A0 I'm sticking with a more classical approach. > > =A0 > > I thought it would be fun to do at least one patriotic arrangement. > > =A0 > > Any suggestions? > > =A0 > > Brad Eveland > > bradekc@yahoo.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: FYI -- Minister at Regan Library today (x-posted) From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 16:16:56 EDT     -------------------------------1086639416 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi, Y'all! I thougth some of you might be interested in knowing that it was the Rev. =   Dr. Michael Wenning (the "W" is pronounced as a "V") who officiated at the = service today for President Reagan. Dr. Wenning was, for several years, = the senior minister of the Bel Air Presbyterian Church where the Reagans are = members. He's a great man, wonderful preacher, loves great hymns and is a fan of classical organ music. He's from South Africa (yes, he has "that" accent) = but has been in this country several decades, serving in Pittsburgh, as well as California. Now in quasi-retirement, Michael is the Minister of the Chapel at the Lost = Tree Village in North Palm Beach, FL, during the Florida "season," and is = on the faculty of King's Seminary in the Los Angeles area. King's is the = seminary begun by Dr. Jack Hayford. I just thought you'd like to know. Yours, Darryl by the Sea Nashville   -------------------------------1086639416 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; = charset=3D3DUS-ASCII"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1400" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY id=3D3Drole_body style=3D3D"FONT-SIZE: 12pt; COLOR: #000000; = FONT-FAMILY:=3D20=3D Arial"=3D20 bottomMargin=3D3D7 leftMargin=3D3D7 topMargin=3D3D7 = rightMargin=3D3D7><FONT id=3D3Drol=3D e_document=3D20 face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D3> <DIV>Hi, Y'all!</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>I thougth some of you might be interested in knowing that it was the = Re=3D v.=3D20 Dr. Michael Wenning (the "W" is pronounced as a "V") who officiated at = the=3D20 service today for President Reagan. Dr. Wenning was, for several years, = the=3D20 senior minister of the Bel Air Presbyterian Church where the Reagans = are=3D20 members. He's a great man, wonderful preacher, loves great hymns and is a = fa=3D n of=3D20 classical organ music. He's from South Africa (yes, he&nbsp;has "that" = accen=3D t)=3D20 but has been in this country several decades, serving in Pittsburgh, as = well=3D as=3D20 California.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Now in quasi-retirement, Michael is the Minister of the Chapel at the = L=3D ost=3D20 Tree Village in North Palm Beach, FL, during the Florida "season," and is = on=3D the=3D20 faculty of King's Seminary in the Los Angeles area. King's is the seminary = b=3D egun=3D20 by Dr. Jack Hayford.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>I just thought you'd like to know.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Yours,</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Darryl by the Sea</DIV> <DIV>Nashville</DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>   -------------------------------1086639416--  
(back) Subject: Digital Action From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 16:23:56 -0400   Bud said:   "Think about the lifespan of the average computer ... I HAVE a "twenty-year old computer, and it still WORKS, but virtually EVERYTHING "in it has been replaced at one time or another."   Bud has a 20 year old computer! What kind. I bought an IBM Portable PC (about the size of a tenor sax case) around 1985. It had a fold down keyboard and a small amber screen. It came with 640kb of RAM and I even paid extra to have a 20MB hard drive installed. I paid about $1000 for it with Dad's IBM discount. The one I purchased for my office in 1989 was an IBM PS/2 Model 30-286 for which I paid extra to have a whopping 1024 kb of RAM (double the usual) and a 20 MB (not GB) hard drive. Fortunately, = these mainly obsolesced for me as opposed to quitting on me.   Where this applies to organs . . . the digital or computerized relays = offer some fantastic capabilities for the money - as long as it all works. Some capabilities are simply matters of software programming. Transposing, = MIDI, zillions of pistons and levels of memory are possible. If all the pipes = are on unit chests, one can sit at a laptop and "move" ranks around to any division without having to swap chests or actually alter the physical locations of pipes.   The computers work great as long as they are working. But . . . several times I've stayed up at the office for hours into the night trying to diagnose some seemingly senseless "conflict" that causes the computer to crash unexpectedly. There are no wires that I can trace out, no actual physical element who's function I can test, no way I can "hotwire" the function temporarily. The problem lies somewhere in the CPU.   Computers are definitely female regardless of whether or not the ports on the back have pins or holes!!   Keith    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Action From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 16:41:07 EDT     --part1_1e8.2268de0b.2df62ce3_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 6/7/2004 4:24:47 PM Eastern Standard Time, kwzimmerman@alltel.net writes:   > The problem lies somewhere in the CPU   which often can be replaced post haste with the latest at a fraction of upkeep like on old analog organs..............   dale in Florida   --part1_1e8.2268de0b.2df62ce3_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><HTML><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">In a message dated = 6/7/2004 4:=3D 24:47 PM Eastern Standard Time, kwzimmerman@alltel.net writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D3D"#000000"=3D BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 = PTSIZE=3D3D10 F=3D AMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">The problem lies = somewhere in=3D20=3D the CPU</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" = style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR:=3D20=3D #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans = MS" LANG=3D =3D3D"0"><BR> which often can be replaced post haste with the latest at a fraction of = upke=3D ep like on old analog organs..............<BR> <BR> dale in Florida</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1e8.2268de0b.2df62ce3_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Action From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 16:46:59 -0400   At 04:23 PM 6/7/2004, Keith wrote:   >Computers are definitely female regardless of whether or not the ports on >the back have pins or holes!! > >Keith   My Goodness, Keith, - if djb and some others on the list can get their knickers in a twist over calling an electronic organ a "toaster", I don't =   doubt that the ladies among us might get a little upset at the idea of computers being considered as the feminine gender!   I should duck for cover "toute suite"!   Best of luck,   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: Patriotic suggestions From: "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 17:46:41 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------040503010005030803050103 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii; format=3Dflowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Didn't Dudley Buck write a set of variations on the National Anthem too?   Mack   John Vanderlee wrote:   >> > >> I thought it would be fun to do at least one patriotic arrangement. > >> > >   --------------040503010005030803050103 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv=3D"Content-Type" = content=3D"text/html;charset=3DISO-8859-1"> <title></title> </head> <body text=3D"#000000" bgcolor=3D"#ffffff"> Didn't&nbsp; Dudley Buck write a set of variations on the National Anthem too?<br> <br> Mack<br> <br> John Vanderlee wrote:<br> <blockquote type=3D"cite" cite=3D"midp0510030bbcea9d795ecd@%5B143.229.45.245%5D"> <style type=3D"text/css"><!-- blockquote, dl, ul, ol, li { padding-top: 0 ; padding-bottom: 0 } --></style> <title>Re: Patriotic suggestions</title> <blockquote type=3D"cite" cite=3D"">&nbsp;</blockquote> <blockquote type=3D"cite" cite=3D"">I thought it would be fun to do at least one patriotic arrangement.</blockquote> <blockquote type=3D"cite" cite=3D"">&nbsp;</blockquote> <br> </blockquote> </body> </html>   --------------040503010005030803050103--    
(back) Subject: Re: Patriotic suggestions From: "DVR" <DVRmusician@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 17:00:34 -0500   Brad.... Charles Callahan's "Patriotic Suite" is an excellent choice! I have performed many times with wonderful audience response! Donna Van Riper, M.M., B.A.   "Keep a Song in Your Heart!". . . . .Donna    
(back) Subject: Re: Patriotic suggestions From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2004 18:00:51 EDT     -------------------------------1086645651 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear List Friends, When we make suggestions for repertoire, both choral and organ, may we include the publisher? It's so much easier to locate the piece from our = favorite vendor if we know. And for sure, I'm as guilty as others! I promise I'll = do better! Thanks. Darryl by the Sea Nashville, TN   -------------------------------1086645651 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; = charset=3D3DUS-ASCII"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1400" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY id=3D3Drole_body style=3D3D"FONT-SIZE: 12pt; COLOR: #000000; = FONT-FAMILY:=3D20=3D Arial"=3D20 bottomMargin=3D3D7 leftMargin=3D3D7 topMargin=3D3D7 = rightMargin=3D3D7><FONT id=3D3Drol=3D e_document=3D20 face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D3> <DIV>Dear List Friends,</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>When we make suggestions for repertoire, both choral and organ, may = we=3D20 include the publisher? It's so much easier to locate the piece from our = favo=3D rite=3D20 vendor if we know. And for sure, I'm as guilty as others! I promise I'll = do=3D20 better!</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Thanks.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Darryl by the Sea</DIV> <DIV>Nashville, TN</DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>   -------------------------------1086645651--  
(back) Subject: Re: digital "action" From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 15:43:37 -0700       Arie Vandenberg wrote:   > At 12:32 PM 2004-06-07 -0700, you wrote: > >> "Digital" isn't really an ACTION ... "digital" (when applied to a PIPE >> organ) simply means that housekeeping chores (stop action, combination >> action, the connection between the keys and pipes, etc.) are >> CONTROLLED by a computer. It generally replaces electro-pneumatic or >> electro-mechanical RELAYS; it doesn't have anything DIRECTLY to do >> with the action ITSELF. You can apply digital technology to ANY >> electric-action organ. >> >> Inside the organ, there are still only a handful of ways of actually >> making the organ PLAY: >> >> 1. Tracker action >> 2. Barker lever (pneumatic assistance to what is still basically >> tracker action) >> 3. Tubular pneumatic action >> 4. Electro-pneumatic action (can be applied to either slider or pitman >> chests) >> 5. Electro-mechanical action (can be applied to either slider or >> pitman chests. >> >> I personally am VERY wary of applying ANY digital technology to pipe >> organs ... we had an instance locally where the original manufacturer >> of the digital equipment had gone out of business; the organ needed >> repairs to the stop and key action; replacement parts were >> unavailable; the whole system had to be replaced at great expense. >> >> Think about the lifespan of the average computer ... I HAVE a >> twenty-year old computer, and it still WORKS, but virtually EVERYTHING >> in it has been replaced at one time or another. The technology is >> slow, and primitive. I keep it only because it runs a mailing label >> program that suits my needs. >> >> In the USA, we had several organ builders in the 19th and early 20th >> century that built "catalog" organs. They were shipped out by railroad >> to remote places, along with instructions for assembling them ... the >> instructions were nothing that a local blacksmith couldn't follow. >> Many of those organs are still playing today BECAUSE the mechanism IS >> simple, and the replacement parts (wood, leather, etc.) are still >> generally available. >> >> Tracker organs have been around for more than a thousand years; they >> WORK; they keep ON working; and when they DO have to be repaired, the >> repairs are SIMPLE to DO. >> >> My second choice, though there are some issues about pipe speech, >> would be electro-mechanical action applied to slider chests. It's >> simple to build, and simple to maintain. >> >> Electro-pneumatic actions and pitman chests are wonders of the early >> Industrial Revolution, and a well-built one will last up to a hundred >> years, but when it comes time to releather it, it's a NIGHTMARE (grin). >> >> Cheers, >> >> Bud Clark > > > Bud, > > I would like to visit this thousand year old tracker you are talking = about.   Arie, I think if you re-read that sentence, you will discover that I'm speaking of the GENRE, not a specific instrument. But, as a matter of fact, there IS one: Sion, Switzerland. > > In fact I would like to visit a 500 year old pipe organ that has NEVER > been worked on, other than basic maintenance and tuning. > > It is true that most trackers have simple mechanisms, but still in > general trackers get an overhaul every 50 to 75 years, assuming they are =   > played much at all.   The K & G I speak of below was played for 3-4 Masses and Vespers DAILY; most RC organs (anyway) WERE.   Look at all those famous organs in Europe, > especially in Holland, and they had restorations done 2 or 3 times > during the 20th century.   MOST of those were ill-informed attempts to electrocute and romanticize the instruments; the second rebuilds were usually attempts to put them back the way they WERE, and/or re-trackerize them when the newer electric action or pneumatic action failed. > > The newer electro-pneumatic chests and pitman chests are fairly easy to > re-leather. Just drop the pouch boards shave off the leather, and put > new ones on. The primary ones are a bigger job though. > > The biggest problem with pipe organs, and this is what is causing a lot > of churches to think twice about one, is not only the initial cost of > one, but the on going maintenance, and the cost of a periodic overhaul. =     Please. I've read all the electronic substitute makers' propaganda about that. What they DON'T tell you is that speakers will need re-coning or replacing every 10-15 years (more often near the coast), and that you will be REPLACING their instruments every 20-30 years.   What costs MONEY is when a church puts in a pipe organ and DOESN'T keep up with the maintenance. That's the churches' fault, NOT the organs.   > Plus the cost of climate control.   We moved an 1898 Koehnken & Grimm from Holy Cross Monastery to the Immaculata Church in Cincinnati in the 1970s. NONE of those old Catholic barns were EVER heated much above 50 F. in the winter, and THEN only on Sundays. It was 105 F. in the gallery the June we took it out, and the humidity was about 90%. ALL it needed was the reservoir releathered and a few broken trackers fixed. The pallet leathers were PRISTINE. It probably hadn't seen a tuner in decades; it was still in reasonable tune when we took it down.   DRY central heating and A/C does more damage to organs, pianos, furniture, etc. than NOT having it. If a church chooses to run the A/C at 60 F. in the summer and the furnace at 80 F. in the winter, it's because the PEOPLE want it that cold and that hot ... NOT the organs.   A lot of churches here in Canada just > can no longer afford it. Heck, they can't even fix the leaky roof, > 'caus they have already dipped into next years budget. Another problem > here is the lack of organists. Churches just are not going to spend big =   > bucks on an organ, if they can't get anyone to play it.   But isn't that true of electronic substitutes as well as pipe organs? > > But that doesn't mean I don't think pipe organs are not worth it. > Musically they are superior to digital instruments, or digital pianos, > or acoustic pianos for the traditional type of sacred music, and for > playing the organ literature. It is just that the market for new > instruments up here is so small, that it is discouraging. > > Arie V. > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ > Arie Vandenberg > Classic Organbuilders > ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com > Tel.: 905-475-1263 >   I have YET to see a church where there was a WILL to have a pipe organ and somebody to play it that DIDN'T succeed in both.   My mother's church had a "catalog" TP Estey ... IT saw an organ tech ... NEVER. When they built a larger church, the Estey (still playing) was replaced by a small new pipe organ. The women had saved butter and egg money for DECADES to buy it. They never CONSIDERED an electronic substitute. It simply wasn't on the table. And this was in a little mining town of 2000 people. The church probably had 200 members at MOST.   I don't want to put words into Seb Gluck's mouth, but he has OFTEN said that it is the defeatist attitude of SOME organist that results in an electronic substitute being installed, and/or downy-bird organists (my words, not his) who just HAVE to have 100 equivalent electronic "ranks" so they can play (fall through?) the Widor toccata once or twice a year, rather than having a small pipe organ that is built to accompany the congregation and choir, which, after all, IS the job of a CHURCH organ.   Yes, it's nice to have a recital organ, but not at the expense of having pipes at ALL. Preludes and postludes are NOT that important, at least not in liturgical churches. MOST Roman Catholic, Anglican, and Lutheran churches can be served VERY well by a correctly designed, voiced, and installed encased organ of 10-20 stops.   There is a ONE-rank Wicks in a small Lutheran church here in San Diego. It wouldn't have been MY choice, but it accompanies the LITURGY quite admirably.   There is a FINE little 2m Johnson in the old downtown RC church in Elyria OH that accompanies the singing of upwards of 1000 people every Sunday. It is correctly voiced and scaled for the room, which has excellent acoustics.   There's a ONE-manual Johnson in the Evangelische Kirke in National City, just south of me, that does an equally fine job ... tall, narrow, German hall-church, good acoustics.   There's a ONE-manual Ott (newish) in Founders' Chapel at the local Catholic university. I HAVE played a recital on THAT organ, and it's a MARVELOUS little work-horse.   It simply is not good stewardship to install an electronic substitute for $50K-$100K that is going to have to be replaced every 20-30 years when you could recycle a marvelous 19th century pipe organ like the one Seb rescued in New York that will BE there for a couple of hundred years.   People turn up their noses at small organs and recycled 19th century organs. That's unfortunate, because they can make more MUSIC than ANY amount of digitalia. It's the ORGANISTS who don't know what to do with them ... among other things, there's no place to HIDE ... you can't pull great handfuls of stops, crank up the reverb, and muck about and make a half-way impressive sound like you can on an electronic substitute.   You have to choose literature that suits the organ, and play it MUSICALLY.   I rest my case (grin).   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Action From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2004 15:46:41 -0700       Keith Zimmerman wrote:   > Bud said: > > "Think about the lifespan of the average computer ... I HAVE a > "twenty-year old computer, and it still WORKS, but virtually EVERYTHING > "in it has been replaced at one time or another." > > Bud has a 20 year old computer!       What kind.   RadShack TRS-80 Model III   Cheers,   Bud