PipeChat Digest #4550 - Wednesday, June 9, 2004
 
Diapason Depots? Organ Barns?
  by "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Another sad story -- five years in the making
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: orphans of the storm
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
foam speakers
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Sell a 16' Bourdon
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Reconing speakers
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
Re: Reconing speakers
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Reconing speakers
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
Re: foam speakers
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: foam speakers
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: digital "action"
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Strange request
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
MEININGER BLOWERS (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: foam speakers
  by <gdeboer@bluemarble.net>
Re: Gee Golly Whiz (airfares)
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
Re: Tower Chimes
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Diapason Depots? Organ Barns? From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 08 Jun 2004 13:29:41 -0700   The late Alan Laufman tried to act as a central clearing-house / depot for such things, but he was simply overwhelmed. What's needed is four or five locations nationwide.   There has simply GOT to be away to apply modern marketing techniques to pipe organs ... some 19th century builders had showrooms in at least a few major cities, with small "off-the-shelf" catalog organs you could "take home with you." Faced with plug-and-play electronic substitutes (Allen can deliver even a large custom model in less than a year's time), in our "want it YESTERDAY" consumer culture it's asking quite a bit for the average organ committee to spend big bucks on something they can't HEAR, even if you CAN get them to go hear instruments by the same builder that are of the same size and in comparable acoustical = environments.   I'm not saying it's RIGHT, but if I want an Allen or a Rodgers, I just have to get in the car and drive a few blocks to the Allen or the Rodgers store; if I want a PIPE organ, I'm faced with a HORRENDOUSLY complex process that can take five, ten, even twenty YEARS. I spent six years on the pipe organ project at St. Matt's, only to have ALL that work tossed out the window when the chairman of the organ committee arbitrarily decided that digital substitutes had reached par with pipe organs, and that I only wanted a pipe organ for the "prestige."   I know advertising costs money, but for instance: in The Church Annual, the "bible" of the American Episcopal Church, there are two or three small ads for pipe organs and SEVERAL *full-page* ads for electronic substitutes. Now, I can tell you, Episcopal churches looking for vendors of just about ANYTHING go to the Annual FIRST ... stained glass, church furniture, alarm systems, record-keeping software, vestments, choir robes, etc. etc. etc.   Cheers,   Bud       John Vanderlee wrote:     > so why can't I sell a 16' Bourdon? must be fortune in clear lumber! > Thinking of offering it to a cabinet maker to cut up for other uses. > > John V > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Another sad story -- five years in the making From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 08 Jun 2004 15:27:54 -0500   My professor is always saying that a one manual, 8 stop organ is all his church needs. They have a 17 stop Casavant.   From looking at the registrations that untrained organists leave on my organs, I don't think the larger stop list does them any good. It just seems like they use ALL the stops and then use the pedal to decide how loud they want it.   I am completely with my teacher in believing that a well-voiced -even if small- pipe organ WILL do the job.   Alicia Zeilenga      
(back) Subject: Re: orphans of the storm From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 08 Jun 2004 15:38:45 -0500   Thanks Bud! I feel the exact same way, but it's almost useless to say anything most of the time, since I'm all of 20. Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tue, 08 Jun 2004 09:45:41 -0700 Subject: orphans of the storm   > > > F. Richard Burt wrote: > > > > > > > Reconing speakers is a whole lot easier than replacing > > the vast amount of leather valves in a windchest. That > > is both an economic and practical advantage. Let's > > meet again in 2025 and discuss this subject again. <grins> > > > > F. Richard Burt > > Dorian Organs > > > > > > . > > > > > > You make my point. I'm talking about SLIDER windchests with > electro-mechanical or tracker pull-downs. There are not "vast amounts > of > leather valves" in a slider windchest, whether on electro-mechanical OR > tracker action ... there are sixty-one pallets (presuming a normal > keyboard compass) and that's IT. And, as I mentioned, given the QUALITY > of leather 100 years ago, the K & G we moved needed NO pallet leathers. > > MOST of the problems Arie, Bob and others have talked about have been > with shoddily-made slider chests and tracker actions that used inferior > materials. It happens. There are at least a couple of electronic > substitutes that can't pass the UL safety tests (!). > > As to the organs at Organ Clearing House and elsewhere, it requires a > certain amount of VISION to see them as fine instruments of integrity > in > their own right, and to accept them as such. It also requires that > churches PLAN AHEAD for pipe organs, involving a builder from DAY ONE, > BEFORE the blueprints are drawn. How many places have the foresight to > do THAT? > > Again, the fault lies with the churches and the organists, NOT with > those wonderful old organs. > > As someone said, "why is a Stradivarius seen as a priceless antique, > but > an old organ as a piece of junk?" Time and again we've ALL seen > PRICELESS 19th century pipe and early 20th century pipe organs go down > with a building, or be hauled away to the dump. > > And that will CONTINUE to happen until we OURSELVES, the ORGANISTS, > learn to value them for what they are: finely-crafted musical > instruments ... AND we learn how to play them and the literature that > was intended for them ... not EVERY church organ needs to have the > resources to play the Liszt "Ad nos" or the Reger "Morning Star" > (chuckle). > > Barbara Owen and Organ Historical Society have been TIRELESS champions > of BOTH the instruments AND their literature. > > I cannot IMAGINE substituting ANY electronic sound for the singing 8' > Principal of a Hook, a Johnson, a Koehnken & Grimm, etc. Those who have > ears to HEAR, go and LISTEN. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: foam speakers From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 8 Jun 2004 16:07:00 -0500   No, the speakers I refer to had the actual cones of some sort of foam material that just literally began to fall apart.........shreds of "cone" were falling out. I don't know the exact substance, but it seems to have some sort of foam structure. There was NO foam in suspending the speakers whatsoever. FWIW, these were the Radio Shack Mach 1 line. I know, I know, there were not audiophile quality speakers, but they were one of the few affordable speakers I could find that had 15" woofers and did a decent job reproducing the bass of organ pipes. But the reconed speakers are warmer in sound; the originals were rather sterile.   Dennis Steckley   Ain't No Tagline Here!        
(back) Subject: Sell a 16' Bourdon From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 8 Jun 2004 16:39:02 -0500   SELL a 16' bourdon, John? Heck, I can't even GIVE one away with matching chests!   Dennis Steckley   Ain't No Tagline Here!        
(back) Subject: Re: Reconing speakers From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Tue, 8 Jun 2004 16:38:19 -0500   HOW DO THE SPEAKER WITH ALUMINUM CONES HOLD UP? James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Artisan of Wood WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message ----- From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, June 08, 2004 11:06 AM Subject: Re: Reconing speakers     > At 10:26 AM 2004-06-08 -0500, you wrote: > >John said: That is probably because your speakers are old enough to be > >coned with cardboard, rather than with foam rubber, which is = susceptible > >to a mold which causes it to disintegrate. The speakers on my sound > >system needed reconing after less than ten years. > >____________________ > > > >Interesting, John. In the mid-1980's, I bought a pair of stereo > >speakers with 15" woofers. They had some sort of FOAM cones which > >totally disintegrated along about 1998. I had them reconed; the new > >cones appear to be traditional "paper." In any case, they sound better > >than ever. > > Dennis, > > I assume that you are talking about the suspension material itself = rather > than the cone. Most speaker cones are still of the paper or treated = paper > variety. It is the suspension material where the issue is. > > Generally paper suspensions have very poor compliance as it is too stiff > and tends to have distortions in shape when played, especially when = played > loud. A better solution is corrugated treated cloth material, which is > better, but still stiff. > > The problem with the foam suspensions, of course is the foam rot, which > causes them to either rip or just fall apart after a period of time. = This > was especially so, with the foam materials of the 70s and into the 80s. My > guess is that the newer stuff will last at least 50% to possibly 100% > longer. The reason foam was used was it had good compliance. > > Most of what we use is a rubber surround, which has very good = compliance, > and also lasts a lot longer. We have used woofers with this type of > material now for well over 20 years, and have had nary a problem. The > problem though is you can't get 15" or 18" woofers with this type of > surround, I guess because of lack of demand. > > You may ask what does compliance have to do with this. Well it has to = do > with excursion of the cone ( total distance of forward and backward > travel), as well as efficiency. If you use a stiffer suspension that means > a whole lot more watts demanded from the amplifier. If these speakers = are > asked to put out sufficient volume in a church setting, you have to = think > efficiency pretty quickly, otherwise you amplifiers will run out of > headroom, and distort. So what works in a house with an 8" woofer, will > not work in a church. And the problem is usually in the lower frequency > range where amps. and speakers run out of capacity in a larger room. > > If you have a properly designed audio system on an electronic organ, it > will sound much better, the speakers will last longer. The fact that so > many electronic organs only have 2 or 4 audio channels does not help > matters much. To mimic a pipe organ, in terms of spread and weight of tone > even remotely you more audio channels. But then of course the price = goes > up as well, sometimes quite a lot, as good audio is never inexpensive. > > Having been in the business for 25 years, believe me, I have seen a lot = of > bad speaker designs, a lot of rotted foam, some ripped paper cones, > etc. Not pretty. > > So, I can readily understand some people's aversion to electronic > organs. If a product is only as good as it's weakest link, surely an > electronic organ will never sound any better than it's bad audio system (if > indeed it is bad). > > Arie V. > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ > Arie Vandenberg > Classic Organbuilders > ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com > Tel.: 905-475-1263 > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Reconing speakers From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 08 Jun 2004 18:04:07 -0400   At 05:38 PM 6/8/2004, James Grebe wrote:   >HOW DO THE SPEAKER WITH ALUMINUM CONES HOLD UP?   Back in the early 1960's in England, there were some speakers made by GEC with aluminum cones. I seem to remember that they were either called "Presence" or "Surround". I had a pair of 8 inch for my mid range speakers, but they were too bright for my liking.   I gave them to my brother, back in England. He uses them them to this day, =   and they sound well enough, - having mellowed quite a bit over the past 40 =   years! Or have I simply just got used to the brightness?   Now, I am sure that aluminum cones would more or less disintegrate in a sea-side atmosphere, but he lives in the middle of England, - a long way from the sea.   Did they ever show up on this side of the pond?   I have been a speaker buff for most of my life, and have listened to far too many to remember them all, but it seems to me that the well tried and tested paper cones have turned out best overall.   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: Reconing speakers From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Tue, 8 Jun 2004 18:02:15 -0500   Aluminum coned speakers are used by Hartke, a manufacturer of stage amps, and Sharper Image is producing HI-Fi speakers with alum also.. James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Artisan of Wood WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message ----- From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, June 08, 2004 5:04 PM Subject: Re: Reconing speakers     > At 05:38 PM 6/8/2004, James Grebe wrote: > > >HOW DO THE SPEAKER WITH ALUMINUM CONES HOLD UP? > > Back in the early 1960's in England, there were some speakers made by = GEC > with aluminum cones. I seem to remember that they were either called > "Presence" or "Surround". I had a pair of 8 inch for my mid range > speakers, but they were too bright for my liking. > > I gave them to my brother, back in England. He uses them them to this = day, > and they sound well enough, - having mellowed quite a bit over the past = 40 > years! Or have I simply just got used to the brightness? > > Now, I am sure that aluminum cones would more or less disintegrate in a > sea-side atmosphere, but he lives in the middle of England, - a long way > from the sea. > > Did they ever show up on this side of the pond? > > I have been a speaker buff for most of my life, and have listened to far > too many to remember them all, but it seems to me that the well tried = and > tested paper cones have turned out best overall. > > Bob Conway > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: foam speakers From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 08 Jun 2004 18:37:18 -0500   Perhaps it was something similar to whatever *this* is, pictured in a recently completed eBay transaction I stumbled across. I wouldn't have guessed that they ever made such a thing...! (item #5702639467)   http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=3D50597&item=3D57026= 39467&rd=3D1   --Tim   At 04:07 PM 6/8/2004, you wrote: >No, the speakers I refer to had the actual cones of some sort of foam >material    
(back) Subject: Re: foam speakers From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jun 2004 19:48:02 -0400   Tim --   The speaker pictured in the expired auction is a Yamaha Natural Voice Speaker. It was standard issue on all early Yamaha electone organs. We = who sold th4e Yamahas referred to them as giant ears. The sound supposed radiated throughout the entire unit not in the traditional piston movement we are all familiar with. Only problem was they were lousy for pedals.   When Yamaha started producing organs in the US (apanese components = assembled in US cabinets, the giant ear was replaced by traditional speakers. = That's one of the main reasons I bought my Yamaha (1979) in the US cabinet, the speakers were much better plus they had real internal leslies inthem as well.   Tom Hoehn, Organist Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes, Ellenton, FL (substitute - 4/42 Wurlitzer) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL (4/9?- = Rodgers/Ruffati/Wicks) Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS/VotS-ATOS/DTOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOUploads/ ----- Original Message ----- From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, June 08, 2004 7:37 PM Subject: Re: foam speakers     > Perhaps it was something similar to whatever *this* is, pictured in a > recently completed eBay transaction I stumbled across. I wouldn't have > guessed that they ever made such a thing...! (item #5702639467) > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=3D50597&item=3D57026= 39467&rd=3D1 > > --Tim > > At 04:07 PM 6/8/2004, you wrote: > >No, the speakers I refer to had the actual cones of some sort of foam > >material > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: digital "action" From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Wed, 9 Jun 2004 08:26:51 +0800   I have nothing against a good tracker action. There is a small Wm Hill in = a church in my town which was built in 1890, resotired in the 1970s after 80 years of service and is in fine condition thirty years later. I merely = cited instances of badly built trackers in response to the comment on the longevity of electronic organs. BE.   > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Tuesday, June 08, 2004 8:47 AM > Subject: Re: digital "action" > > It largely depends on how well built a tracker organ is. Some = instruments > have held up extremely well, such as the von Beckerath at St. Michael's > Episcopal Church in New York City, or the Frobenius in Queen's College, > Oxford, which have both delivered faultless service for forty years. > John Speller > >    
(back) Subject: Strange request From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 08 Jun 2004 19:37:17 -0500   About two years ago I heard the piece "A Fancy" by William Harris, and obtained a copy. This coincided with my infamous decision to unburden myself of the organist position at St. A's. I never looked at the music until yesterday, when I noticed that the first page of my set of the Novello edition was cut right after the first beat of the first measures of each line.   Does anyone have this piece and would be willing to fax me a copy of the first page only?   Many thanks.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: MEININGER BLOWERS (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jun 2004 22:17:05 EDT     --part1_53.de776b2.2df7cd21_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hello all   I am seeking information on the company that builds Meininger blowers or a =   link their web site. Any assistance will be greatly appreciated. Thanks = so much.   -Scott in Memphis   Scott F. Foppiano Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.   --part1_53.de776b2.2df7cd21_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><HTML><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Hello all<BR> <BR> I am seeking information on the company that builds Meininger blowers or a = l=3D ink their web site.&nbsp; Any assistance will be greatly = appreciated.&nbsp;=3D20=3D Thanks so much.<BR> <BR> -Scott in Memphis<BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" = style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR:=3D20=3D #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D4 PTSIZE=3D3D14 FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Monotype = Corsiva" LA=3D NG=3D3D"0"><B>Scott F. Foppiano</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" = BACK=3D3D"#ffffff=3D " style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSER=3D IF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0"></B><BR> Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D3D"#00000=3D 0" BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 = PTSIZE=3D3D10=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Monotype Corsiva" LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_53.de776b2.2df7cd21_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: foam speakers From: <gdeboer@bluemarble.net> Date: Tue, 8 Jun 2004 22:04:13 -0500   Tim,   The Yamaha speaker shown was the type as found in the Yamaha Electone home= =20 organs. They were advertised as having "natural sound"   Gary     Quoting Tim Bovard <tmbovard@earthlink.net>:   > Perhaps it was something similar to whatever *this* is, pictured in a=20 > recently completed eBay transaction I stumbled across. I wouldn't have= =20 > guessed that they ever made such a thing...! (item #5702639467) >=20 > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll? ViewItem&category=3D50597&item=3D5702639467&rd=3D1 >=20 > --Tim >=20 > At 04:07 PM 6/8/2004, you wrote: > >No, the speakers I refer to had the actual cones of some sort of foam > >material >=20 > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >=20 >=20 >=20       >  
(back) Subject: Re: Gee Golly Whiz (airfares) From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Wed, 09 Jun 2004 00:11:53 -0400   Dale and all list members, I've not traveled by air a great deal, but I have gained a bit of tech savvy. Two interesting and free tools to use in travel are to be found = here:   http://johnnyjet.com/ and http://www.sidestep.com/desktop/?SbAutoOpen=3D1&SbLoc=3DF.   The first, Johnnyjet, has all the links you could want for travel, and they're all in one place! The second, SideStep, is a small utility that will install itself and show up as a sidebar whenever you look for prices at Orbitz, Travelocity, or any of the other ones. It's not spyware or intrusive except when you are looking for bargains. It will go out over = the WWW and get a wide range of prices and carriers.   When I first was looking for a one-way to LA, I had a long lead time. The best offer I found was on AirTran for $114. I ended up not being able to = go in September but had to wait 'til the end of November when I only had ten days to plan the trip. I ended up having to pay the dizzying sum of $147 = on Delta with one stop in Atlanta. I used SideStep and was happy about my choices. Of course I was going from Dayton, Ohio to LA and not some out-of-the-way place like Walla Walla, WA or Votaw, TX.   The organ tie-in? My trip to LA was to pick up a three-manual MIDIfied console that had been connected to a Casavant in sunny southern California =   just two and one-half blocks from the beautiful Pacific. I think I got a swell deal there as well as the great one on plane tickets.   Ross Coulson "Cole" Votaw, Springfield, Ohio, USA    
(back) Subject: Re: Tower Chimes From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Tue, 08 Jun 2004 23:18:24 -0400   Steven Skinner wrote: >as the 50's bong-atrons have been dead for decades.   I give. What is a "bong-atron"?   Ross Coulson "Cole" Votaw, Springfield, Ohio, USA