PipeChat Digest #4553 - Wednesday, June 9, 2004
 
Re: small pipe organs
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: small pipe organs
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: small pipe organs
  by "Peter Rodwell" <iof@ctv.es>
Rebuilding: Organbuilder vs. Musician
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
New Theatre Organ CDs
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: small pipe organs
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: small pipe organs
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Denominational Organs
  by "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Rebuilding: Organbuilder vs. Musician
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
small pipe organs
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
RE: Re: foam speakers
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Rebuilding: Organbuilder vs. Musician
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Email
  by "Ken Walker" <ken@stmaa.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: small pipe organs From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jun 2004 14:17:30 EDT     --part1_1dd.2398d489.2df8ae3a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 6/9/2004 12:37:16 PM Eastern Standard Time, kwzimmerman@alltel.net writes:   > To > put it in perspective, the church where I was organist for 15 years = replaced > its aging Baldwin living room organ (with external speakers) with a = Rodgers > 702 for appr. $17,000. It was a small to medium two manual instrument > which, although it has no pipes, is sooo much better than the one it > replaced.   I should think that at 17K it kinda sorta oughta sound a HECK of a lot = better than old technology............   this sounded like a slap at Baldwin-------i own a working model 5 Baldwin....sounds like 48 year old technology but it still works------and = Union Electric likes it whenever i am at my father's house and warm those tubes up.   just felt called to make sure that everyone knew the 702 probably sounds better than 15 year old Rodgers and Allens......   dale in Florida pro toaster until it is 35 ranks.......   --part1_1dd.2398d489.2df8ae3a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><HTML><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">In a message dated = 6/9/2004 12=3D :37:16 PM Eastern Standard Time, kwzimmerman@alltel.net writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D3D"#000000"=3D BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 = PTSIZE=3D3D10 F=3D AMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">To<BR> put it in perspective, the church where I was organist for 15 years = replaced=3D <BR> its aging Baldwin living room organ (with external speakers) with a = Rodgers<=3D BR> 702 for appr. $17,000.&nbsp; It was a small to medium two manual = instrument<=3D BR> which, although it has no pipes, is sooo much better than the one it<BR> replaced. </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" = style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR:=3D20=3D #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans = MS" LANG=3D =3D3D"0"><BR> I should think that at 17K it kinda sorta oughta sound a HECK of a lot = bette=3D r than old technology............<BR> <BR> this sounded like a slap at Baldwin-------i own a working model 5 = Baldwin...=3D ..sounds like 48 year old technology but it still works------and Union = Electr=3D ic likes it whenever i am at my father's house and warm those tubes = up.<BR> <BR> just felt called to make sure that everyone knew the 702 probably sounds = bet=3D ter than 15 year old Rodgers and Allens......<BR> <BR> dale in Florida pro toaster until it is 35 ranks.......</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1dd.2398d489.2df8ae3a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: small pipe organs From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jun 2004 14:27:24 EDT     --part1_ac.5a0f755c.2df8b08c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 6/9/2004 1:05:25 PM Eastern Standard Time, dillardm@airmail.net writes:   > I CAN'T change out ailing mother-boards. >   if you can do the other things you can change out mother boards...........   i on the other hand cant fix rectifiers, belts and so on....i can pull a pipe.   i can re boot the electronic organ OR i can play the piano like i did when =   the pipe organ shot craps...........   BTW, new digitals have only a very few boards..........keep the electric steady and dont static charge it with your leather and should be okay.   BIG should, but should be. Just like real organs. i dont think i ever = went into a practice room at CCM without the organ working except the Walker = one time where the blower did not.   dale in Florida leaving the fray for now.....   --part1_ac.5a0f755c.2df8b08c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><HTML><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">In a message dated = 6/9/2004 1:=3D 05:25 PM Eastern Standard Time, dillardm@airmail.net writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D3D"#000000"=3D BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 = PTSIZE=3D3D10 F=3D AMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">I CAN'T change out = ailing moth=3D er-boards.<BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" = style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR:=3D20=3D #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans = MS" LANG=3D =3D3D"0"><BR> if you can do the other things you can change out mother = boards...........<B=3D R> <BR> i on the other hand cant fix rectifiers, belts and so on....i can pull a = pip=3D e.<BR> <BR> i can re boot the electronic organ OR i can play the piano like i did when = t=3D he pipe organ shot craps...........<BR> <BR> BTW, new digitals have only a very few boards..........keep the electric = ste=3D ady and dont static charge it with your leather and should be okay.&nbsp; = <B=3D R> <BR> BIG should, but should be.&nbsp; Just like real organs.&nbsp;&nbsp; i dont = t=3D hink i ever went into a practice room at CCM without the organ working = excep=3D t the Walker one time where the blower did not.<BR> <BR> dale in Florida leaving the fray for now.....</FONT></HTML>   --part1_ac.5a0f755c.2df8b08c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: small pipe organs From: "Peter Rodwell" <iof@ctv.es> Date: Wed, 09 Jun 2004 20:28:12 +0200   Quoting Margo Dillard:   > here's one for you - our digital now has "random access" > expression pedals - sometimes, but not all the time, at some > point anywhere from halfway to almost closed, the pedal changes > direction and the organ starts getting louder instead of > softer... [etc]   As anyone in the computer industry will be able to confirm, these are not faults but "undocumented features".   Peter.    
(back) Subject: Rebuilding: Organbuilder vs. Musician From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jun 2004 14:31:19 EDT   Dear Chatters: One of the attitudes that is lethal to modern American organbuilding = is the absolute insistence upon the new. This usually develops into a = situation in which it becomes an "all or nothing" quagmire with disappointing results. I have found that NEITHER side is the offender more often than the = other. Some common scenarios:   (A) A reputable organbuilder examines the existing pipe organ, which = the client wishes to discard in favor of a new instrument. The builder has = been told that there is ONE holdout on the committee, vestry, or board who = believes the organ can be salvaged, and the organbuilder is asked to look at the = present organ "just as a formality" before submitting his design and bid. The organbuilder determines that there are, in fact, exceptional resources in place: A pair of vibrant strings from the 1920s that are the = closest thing he's heard to real French string in America; a wooden 16' Violone = and 16' Bourdon that should stay in the Pedal; 8' and 4' Diapasons that are far = too lar ge for the Great department, but would constitute "free" independent Pedal =   stops in the new scheme; an 8' Flute on the Great that is characterless in = its present incarnation, but the experienced builder knows that at 4' pitch it = could be something beautiful, articulate, and full of life in the new design; a = full and round Clarinet that, although neither flesh nor fowl, would do equal justice to a Parry anthem and a Dandrieu dialogue. "Well, Mr. So-and-so, 'the best organbuilder working in this state,' = has told us that all of this is worthless. At three times your price, we'll go = for the new organ and be safe about it." When the builder asks to purchase the =   good remaining pipework as they ready the church for the new organ, he is = quoted an impossibly high price, and the organ is carted to the landfill, or = given to a hobbyist friend of the organist.   (B) The client is truly convinced that they must save at least SOME of =   the organ. It has served the congregation for many decades, and more funds = are likely to be raised if portions of the organ can be incorporated into the organ, a practice that has been honored for centuries. A consultant tells them, "Well, it's no Skinner," as if all Skinners = were conceived and executed with perfection, and no other organs of merit were ever built. The organ is replaced either with a pipeless imitator, or a = pipe organ of limited scope because the client was convinced that they should = discard their resources.   (C) A knowledgeable consultant asks an organbuilder to propose the relocation of a fine organ. The organbuilder draws upon his knowledge of = what is available, either in his own collection or languishing unused and = unappreciated in another building, and offers three alternatives: A 19th century = instrument of 40 ranks in a freestanding case that can be either returned to = mechanical action, or retained in its rebuilt form, needing only a new keydesk and a cleaning and reregulation of the pipework; a 36 rank Kimball, unaltered, = with the tonal scheme and type of voicing that dovetails beautifully with the = liturgical style and acoustic of the venue; or an instrument built substantially of pristene pipework gleaned from a fine evolved instrument that was removed = from a building that had been sold. All three alternatives are presented because they would make something =   exceptional available to the client. The organbuilder would not promote = anything that might damage his career, and has chosen these alternatives carefully. = In sympathy with the consultant's thesis, they are a perfect match to the musical culture of the client's worship style. "We're not shopping for somebody else's junk, and we are certainly not =   throwing money away on a 'used' organ," comes the cry from the client. "If = it were any good, it wouldn't be available in the first place."   (D) The organist has their pet organbuilder in mind, and will do = anything and everything to have their friend build an organ for them, even if it = means condemning an existing organ to the scrap heap -- or worse. All bids are a =   charade, and the organist holds their breath until they turn blue, all the = while retaining a list of 'experts,' some associated with his pre-ordained organbuilder, to reinforce his position. They either get their beloved = instrument or not, but either way, they find themselves at a different job within a year = of the organ's installation...   Organbuilders really DO want to relocate organs, rebuild organs, and restore organs. Almost any historically revered and respected organbuilder = HAS incorporated older pipework into new organs, or engaged in the rebuilding = and restoration of existing instruments. As long as they are compensated = fairly for their craft and art, honest organbuilders wish to spend their time = creating musical instruments. Yes, there are those who refuse to use ANYTHING that has sung on another's wind, but then it is up to the client to question their motives. = If they prove their case, then the client can feel at ease with the final result. = But I think one might find that the organbuilder usually makes a good effort to respect his clients' interests and his predecessor's efforts.   Sebastian M. Gluck Tonal Director Gluck New York http://www.glucknewyork.com   ..  
(back) Subject: New Theatre Organ CDs From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Wed, 9 Jun 2004 14:31:09 -0400   New theatre organ CDs from Jelani Eddington, Scott Foppiano, Rob Richards, Don Thompson, Simon Gledhill, Donald MacKenzie and others including a Wurlitzer in Germany and two historic theatre organ reissues from Reginal Dixon, are now available at http://www.ohscatalog.com/theatorrec.html    
(back) Subject: Re: small pipe organs From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Wed, 09 Jun 2004 13:42:24 -0500   At 10:39 AM 6/9/04, you wrote:   >Can we lay to rest once and for all the erroneous notion that digital >organs do NOT require maintenance? > >They DO.   Anyone who finds need for a electronic/digital organ technician are in for =   a SHOCK....they demand and usually get fees that would break a real organ builders heart. All electronic devices also have a built in obsolescence factor...none of them will ever be around long enough to qualify for an OHS plaque proclaiming its' significance.   Jon    
(back) Subject: Re: small pipe organs From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jun 2004 14:48:38 EDT     --part1_15b.372e19d4.2df8b586_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 6/9/2004 2:47:02 PM Eastern Standard Time, opus1100@catoe.org writes:   > ...none of them will ever be around long enough to qualify for an > OHS plaque proclaiming its' significance. > >   indeed just like not too many people use an IBM Selectric = anymore.......let alone a Remington Rand or a Model T Ford.   Big grin on my face---- I LOVE this place.   dale in Florida   --part1_15b.372e19d4.2df8b586_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><HTML><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">In a message dated = 6/9/2004 2:=3D 47:02 PM Eastern Standard Time, opus1100@catoe.org writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D3D"#000000"=3D BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 = PTSIZE=3D3D10 F=3D AMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">...none of them will = ever be a=3D round&nbsp; long enough to qualify for an <BR> OHS plaque proclaiming its' significance.<BR> <BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" = style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR:=3D20=3D #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans = MS" LANG=3D =3D3D"0"><BR> indeed just like not too many people use an IBM Selectric = anymore.......let=3D20=3D alone a Remington Rand or a Model T Ford.<BR> <BR> Big grin on my face---- I LOVE this place.<BR> <BR> dale in Florida</FONT></HTML>   --part1_15b.372e19d4.2df8b586_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Denominational Organs From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 09 Jun 2004 11:55:43 -0700       Keith Zimmerman wrote:   > List, > > > Bud's use of the term "Anglicized version" brings up a question that = I've > wanted to ask for a good while. I think I have a very vague idea of = what he > means, but I don't know the specifics. The concept was also stated in a > description of a small organ designed by Kenneth Tickell for a convent - = the > idea that the kind of music that is to be played on the organ dictates = the > size, the stoplist and the voicing. > > > Could someone attempt to give - using specific music - how stoplists = might > vary according to denomination. To keep things simple, I'd like to = consider > a smallish two-manual instrument in similar sized congregations of = different > denominations. > > Thanks, > Keith > >   It not only varies from denomination to denomination, but from country to country. Anglican churches in England (for the most part) have much stronger CHOIRS than we do in the US; they require more accompanimental stops. The US Lutheran churches are slowly but surely sinking into the general protestant pit of "three hymns and an anthem", except for a few high-church LCMS and Wisconsin Synod places, and Alan's ELCA in NYC. The modern RC service in the US requires a hymn-playing machine and a few soft stops for accompanying a cantor.   In Lutheran places where they still sing the chorales and play chorale-preludes, a Germanic stoplist is needed; a swell box probably ISN'T; while the glory of an Anglican organ is "Full Swell to Reeds," which can be as little as an Oboe or Cornopean with sub and super couplers, or a full reed chorus.   Roman Catholic and Anglican organs are pretty much interchangeable, since the historic liturgical method of playing organ in the RC church (versets in alternation with the choir) no longer exists.   A SMALL RC OR ANGLICAN ORGAN   GREAT   16' Bourdon 8' Open Diapason 8' Harmonic Flute 8' Dulciana (big English style), or broad-scale Gamba 4' Octave 2' Fifteenth Mixture 8' Trumpet or Clarinet   SWELL   8' Open Diapason 8' Stopt Diapason 8' Viola 8' Vox angelica 4' Spire Flute 2 2/3' Cornet III 8' Cornopean 8' Oboe   PEDAL   16' Open Wood 16' Bourdon (gt) 10 2/3 Quint Bass 8' Open Bass (metal) 4' Chorale Bass 16' Trombone (wood)   A SMALL LUTHERAN ORGAN IN TRADITIONAL STYLE   GREAT   16' Principal 8' Octave 8' Chimney Flute 4' Octave 2' Octave Mixture 16' Bassoon   POSITIVE   8' Gedeckt 4' Principal 2 2/3' Sesquialtera II (narrow-scale) 2' Octave Mixture 8' Krumhorn   PEDAL   16' Principal (gt) 8' Octave Bass 4' Chorale Bass Mixture 16' Trombone 8' Trumpet   Now, obviously, there are also going to be differences in voicing, style of reeds, and mixture composition.   Either of those organs would play the SERVICE of their respective denominations, and a big chunk of the LITERATURE associated with them. They could be made as trackers, or with slider chests and electric pull-downs.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Rebuilding: Organbuilder vs. Musician From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jun 2004 14:57:51 EDT     --part1_147.2bae3468.2df8b7af_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear dear SG!   i simply have to meet you at LA.....will you have a booth did i read on an =   earlier posting?   It irritates the stuffins out of me when they want to replace old organs....the church i grew up in has a 1931 46 Rank Aeolian.........4 = celestes,10 reeds, it is to die for. No upper work to speak of but some 73 note chests as appropriate and couplers all over the place. The console has been = releatherd 3 times in my 37 years of playing and so really needs help. Combination = action pouches could use some help to.   Competing toasters want to add a big console and digi to make it a = complete organ. It is quite complete as it is..... have played everything from Scronk(?) to Messian on it. Not to composer's specs but beautiful in its = own right.   Go to it and be about the business.....   3 cheers for you and your health.   dale in Florida   --part1_147.2bae3468.2df8b7af_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><HTML><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">Dear dear SG!<BR> <BR> i simply have to meet you at LA.....will you have a booth did i read on an = e=3D arlier posting?<BR> <BR> It irritates the stuffins out of me when they want to replace old = organs....=3D the church i grew up in has a 1931 46 Rank Aeolian.........4 celestes,10 = ree=3D ds, it is to die for.&nbsp;&nbsp; No upper work to speak of but some 73 = note=3D chests as appropriate and couplers all over the place.&nbsp;&nbsp; The = cons=3D ole has been releatherd 3 times in my 37 years of playing and so really = need=3D s help.&nbsp; Combination action pouches could use some help to.<BR> <BR> Competing toasters want to add a big console and digi to make it a = complete=3D20=3D organ.&nbsp; It is quite complete as it is..... have played everything = from=3D20=3D Scronk(?) to Messian on it. Not to composer's specs but beautiful in its = own=3D right.<BR> <BR> Go to it and be about the business.....<BR> <BR> 3 cheers for you and your health.<BR> <BR> dale in Florida</FONT></HTML>   --part1_147.2bae3468.2df8b7af_boundary--  
(back) Subject: small pipe organs From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Wed, 9 Jun 2004 16:30:36 -0400   Floyd Higgins said, "Here's another idea for a small tracker practice/studio/chapel organ. I copied this from the Web, but don't remember the author or site. If you wrote this, please forgive me for this."   Floyd and others,   You may find that article on the following link: http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/essays/kilk.htm   The larger article from which the above link is taken can be found at: http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/schemes/trz/3m.htm which is entitled "Small Three Manual British Organs of the Romantic Zenith."   I posted this same link several months ago during a relatively short = thread about small organs. I was absolutely fascinated by this concept of these very small three manual organs. Actually, there is one organ that had = three manuals with one rank each!!!   I would encourage you to check out = http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/organs.htm which is the homepage for the late Julian Rhodes. Via "Organ Designs" = link, you will find many articles about organ design. I particularly liked the documents by George Dixon.   Enjoy, Keith      
(back) Subject: RE: Re: foam speakers From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2004 08:57:07 +1200     >Bob, actually alumunim holds up very well in a marine environment. Aluminum Oxide, unlike rust (Iron Oxide) forms a very strong protective layer that prevents further oxidation.   This is very true.   I have a very old portable gramophone made by Decca in 1912. It has a spun-aluminium reflector to throw out the sound. It is in perfect order.   Ross   --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.700 / Virus Database: 457 - Release Date: 6/06/2004    
(back) Subject: RE: Rebuilding: Organbuilder vs. Musician From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2004 09:23:04 +1200     > One of the attitudes that is lethal to modern American organbuilding = is the absolute insistence upon the new.   Old ranks can be very useful indeed. To me, the only issue is musicality: = if the rank is in good order, or can easily be put into good order, then keep it if it will add to the musical use of the instrument. I'm thinking specifically of the two very old ranks on the Westminster Abbey organ that E.Power Biggs used in his "The Art of the Organ" records many years ago.   For my home organ here, I'm using almost nothing but old ranks, from host = of dates and sources. This is in large measure because I really could afford absolutely nothing new, but also because it gives me great delight to hear wonderful old tones blending in making a very musical instrument. I would not suggest things quite to that extent in a "public" instrument, but compromises can be easily made.   Here at home, I have, as just examples, a wooden 8ft Stopped Diapason by Jenkins & Farrell from 1883; a Hill Norman & Beard 8ft Vox Humana (of huge scale and heavy metal) from 1931; 16ft Bourdon from an 1871 Hill & Son; Clarinet 8ft from Hobday 1906; 8ft Salicional by Stinkens 1964; 8ft = Dulciana by Stinkens 1994; 4ft Geigen Principal by T.C.Lewis 1884; wooden Claribel Flute by Brake 1928 (from a chamber organ); 16ft Bourdon by Jenkins 1879; 8ft Gedackt (metal) by Laukhuff 1964. Etc. Binding altogether is the = Great's Principal chorus 8 4 2 of Hill & Son pipes from 1871. I hope to add a Mixture there.   Too, I shall be some day making two little balanced sections of pipes of beautiful "classical modern" tone, finely voiced by Stinkens on 2.5" wind. The first division, which I have playing now, was made by Stinkens in = 1974. The other lot were made a year later by the same firm, and equally well voiced but never actually put in an instrument and I found them just a few months ago and managed to buy them. As most of the 4ft was missing, I'm adding two 4fts from elsewhere. So, these two balanced divisions are - 8 Gedackt (all metal) 4 Rohr Flute (chimney flute) 2 Principal (very high tin) 1 1/3 Gemsquint (plain metal 1 Octave (very high tin)   8 Gedackt (all metal) 4 Gemshorn (tapered, Hill & Son 1871) 4 Open Flute (wood, Hill & Son, inverted mouths, 1871) 2 Fifteenth (plain metal) .. Cymbal II-III (high tin)   All great fun. My stuff is all being controlled by a 4m console which was enlarged up from 2m. (I'm not recommending this kind of console for = "public" use).   Ross   --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.700 / Virus Database: 457 - Release Date: 6/06/2004    
(back) Subject: Re: Email From: "Ken Walker" <ken@stmaa.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jun 2004 16:23:49 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C44E68.2E4AD33C Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Please take me off of the email circulation. I have found the discussions interesting and I would love to see more but I can't keep up with them at this time. =3D20   =3D20   Thank you for your service.   =3D20   Ken Walker   ken@stmaa.com   =3D20     ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C44E68.2E4AD33C Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <html xmlns:o=3D3D"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" =3D xmlns:w=3D3D"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" =3D xmlns=3D3D"http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">   <head> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Dus-ascii"> <meta name=3D3DGenerator content=3D3D"Microsoft Word 11 (filtered = medium)"> <style> <!-- /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} a:link, span.MsoHyperlink {color:blue; text-decoration:underline;} a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple; text-decoration:underline;} span.EmailStyle17 {mso-style-type:personal-compose; font-family:Arial; color:windowtext;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} --> </style>   </head>   <body lang=3D3DEN-US link=3D3Dblue vlink=3D3Dpurple>   <div class=3D3DSection1>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>Please take me off of the email circulation.&nbsp; I = =3D have found the discussions interesting and I would love to see more but I =3D can&#8217;t keep up with them at this time.&nbsp; <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>Thank you for your =3D service.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>Ken Walker<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'><a =3D href=3D3D"mailto:ken@stmaa.com">ken@stmaa.com</a><o:p></o:p></span></font><= =3D /p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>   </div>   </body>   </html>   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C44E68.2E4AD33C--