PipeChat Digest #4555 - Thursday, June 10, 2004
 
Rodgers 702
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
Re: Hey, Mister, buy my bourdon PLEASE!
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: foam speakers
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: small pipe organs
  by "Travis L. Evans" <tlevans95@charter.net>
Re: small pipe organs
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: small pipe organs
  by "Ray Ahrens" <Ray_Ahrens@msn.com>
Re: small pipe organs
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: small pipe organs
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
RE: small pipe organs
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Long RE: C-C and SCHNITGER in South America
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <rgunther@cantv.net>
 

(back) Subject: Rodgers 702 From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2004 08:00:07 -0400   Listers,   The Rodgers 702 IS a digital organ. It has divided expression. The salesman said he thought it was voiceable, but it isn't. The 751 and 790 and up are. They had come out as we purchased this model from the = showroom. It does have divided expression, numerous pistons, and 4 levels of memory. I did a google search and found a copy of the brochure on the following = ad: http://vintagehammond.com/selected.asp?ID=3D245   One feature that is probably standard on most MIDI capable organs, each division has one MIDI tab. Using the below-mentioned MIDI device, saving = a combination that includes a MIDI voice to a piston also saves that particular MIDI voice. IOW, even with only a single MIDI tab on Swell, = each of the 6 Swell pistons could have a different MIDI sound assigned to the MIDI tab.   We also purchased the PR300S MIDI sequencer and sound module. A couple times I played a piano/organ duet by myself by sequencing the piano part into the PR300S and playing the organ part along with it. A couple other times, I sequenced the piano accompaniment to a couple of out choir pieces into it and played the vocal parts on the organ along with some MIDI = strings as offeratories.   Regarding the contemporary scene, I used the sound module for a Youth = Sunday in creating sounds such as that cross between a marimba and piano that one often hears on the CDs. I think they liked it.   You have to understand that (1) the pipe organ was unmentionable for this group and (2) the previous organ was having problems going out = occasionally.   The Great Principal sounds really nice as does the Nasongedeckt. The = Swell 4' Koppelflote was very nice for Flute solos. I particularly loved the combination of the Great Principal + Nasongedeckt.   Anyway, that had nothing to do with pipes, but the question was asked.   Keith      
(back) Subject: Re: Hey, Mister, buy my bourdon PLEASE! From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2004 08:01:53 -0700   >Bud sez: > >>>Not necessarily. At least one organ-builder salvaged 19th century >>>timber from a building he was renovating for a new shop. >>> >>>Others (and this isn't limited to organ-builders) scour the >>>countryside for 19th century barns, etc., buy them up, and >>>dismantle them for their lumber. >> >>John Vanderlee wrote: > >>so why can't I sell a 16' Bourdon? must be fortune in clear >>lumber! Thinking of offering it to a cabinet maker to cut up for >>other uses. >> >Bud sez: > >Pedal bourdons aren't made out of windchest-quality hardwoods, to >start with ... they're usually sugar pine or spruce. Bourdons (good, >bad, indifferent) are frankly a dime a dozen. And, that wood has >already been MADE into something. What's needed is the good LUMBER, >unless you happen to have a lovely 19th century stopped wooden flute.   Point taken... but when was the last time you saw so much CLEAR lumber and priced it ? ;-)   John V    
(back) Subject: Re: foam speakers From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2004 08:10:43 -0700   >Perhaps it was something similar to whatever *this* is, pictured in >a recently completed eBay transaction I stumbled across. I wouldn't >have guessed that they ever made such a thing...! (item #5702639467) > >http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=3D50597&item=3D5702= 639467&rd=3D1 > >--Tim > >At 04:07 PM 6/8/2004, you wrote: >>No, the speakers I refer to had the actual cones of some sort of foam >>material > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   I know those speakers.. they were used in the Yamaha "organs" in the '70's. there was a whole spiel that went with the design that had the outline of a human ear. Apparently the public never bought it ( the idea) and from my viewpoint they sounded tinny and plain terrible.   John V  
(back) Subject: Re: small pipe organs From: "Travis L. Evans" <tlevans95@charter.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2004 10:00:48 -0500   Our organ which is a combo has required more maintenance on the digital stuff than on the pipe stuff outside of tuning. Our organ is just a = little over 3 years old. We've had power supplies replaced 3 times, had a pipe driver go bad, and a piston replaced that kept selecting itself.   At my last post I played a 100% pipe organ, we never had to have a = service call to fix anything. Just tunings.   Travis ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andrew Barss" <andrew.barss@ns.sympatico.ca> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, June 09, 2004 11:33 AM Subject: Re: small pipe organs     > I didn't say digital organs don't require maintenance. I said they > don't require REGULAR maintenance -- and pipe organs DO if you want > them to play well. > > My local Allen dealer (with whom I maintain a cordial relationship) has > about 150 digital organs in the field -- some of those dating back as > far as 1972. The store processes approximately 15 service trips per > year on average. Some of those are "repeat offenders" i.e., older > instruments with open key contacts in particularly dirty environments > that require cleaning at least every year or so. That problem, by the > way, has was addressed (by Allen, at least) nearly 20 years ago by > changing to sealed contact switches. > > On average, then, that's (approximately) one trip per organ every ten > years! I'd hate to see the condition of most any pipe organ that only > received service once in ten years. And let me add that, in my > experience, owners of digital organs are far less tolerant of even > little problems than owners of pipe organs -- whom I have seen live > with significant troubles for months "until the tuner gets here." > > Cheers, > Andrew > > On 9-Jun-04, at 12:39 PM, Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications wrote: > > > Can we lay to rest once and for all the erroneous notion that digital > > organs do NOT require maintenance? > > > > They DO. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: small pipe organs From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2004 11:36:35 EDT     --part1_f7.3ba2c37f.2df9da03_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 6/10/2004 11:08:15 AM Eastern Standard Time, tlevans95@charter.net writes:   > At my last post I played a 100% pipe organ, we never had to have a = service > call to fix anything. Just tunings. > >   at my last post i played 100% pipe organ, even after tunings it was not = in tune, it was always losing notes--- and the blower was so noisy it had to = be turned off during sermons.   today with the toaster, the only service call i have had in 4 years was.....wait......still thinking......nope none..... i fixed the screw loosened pedal myself.   never gonna be a good ending to these debates.....LOVE THIS LIST.   dale in Florida     --part1_f7.3ba2c37f.2df9da03_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><HTML><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">In a message dated = 6/10/2004 1=3D 1:08:15 AM Eastern Standard Time, tlevans95@charter.net writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D3D"#000000"=3D BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 = PTSIZE=3D3D10 F=3D AMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">At my last post&nbsp; = I played=3D a 100% pipe organ, we never had to have a service<BR> call to fix anything.&nbsp; Just tunings.<BR> <BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" = style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR:=3D20=3D #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans = MS" LANG=3D =3D3D"0"><BR> at my last post i played 100% pipe organ,&nbsp; even after tunings it was = no=3D t in tune, it was always losing notes--- and the blower was so noisy it = had=3D20=3D to be turned off during sermons.<BR> <BR> today with the toaster,&nbsp;&nbsp; the only service call i have had in 4 = ye=3D ars was.....wait......still thinking......nope none.....<BR> i fixed the screw loosened pedal myself.<BR> <BR> never gonna be a good ending to these debates.....LOVE THIS LIST.<BR> <BR> dale in Florida<BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_f7.3ba2c37f.2df9da03_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: small pipe organs From: "Ray Ahrens" <Ray_Ahrens@msn.com> Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2004 10:40:59 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0CCA_01C44ED7.6B59D100 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Wait a minute! I thought the word "toaster" was verboten on this list. = =3D Doesn't someone's girdle become overly constrictive every time he hears = =3D that word? Y'all get a grip, ok? =3D20               today with the toaster, the only service call i have had in 4 years =3D was.....wait......still thinking......nope none..... i fixed the screw loosened pedal myself.   never gonna be a good ending to these debates.....LOVE THIS LIST.   dale in Florida     ------=3D_NextPart_000_0CCA_01C44ED7.6B59D100 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <STYLE></STYLE>   <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1106" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY id=3D3DMailContainerBody=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-LEFT: 10px; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; =3D COLOR: #000000; BORDER-TOP-STYLE: none; PADDING-TOP: 15px; FONT-STYLE: =3D normal; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana; BORDER-RIGHT-STYLE: none; =3D BORDER-LEFT-STYLE: none; TEXT-DECORATION: none; BORDER-BOTTOM-STYLE: =3D none"=3D20 leftMargin=3D3D0 topMargin=3D3D0 acc_role=3D3D"text" = CanvasTabStop=3D3D"true"=3D20 name=3D3D"Compose message area"><?xml:namespace prefix=3D3D"v" =3D /><?xml:namespace prefix=3D3D"o" /> <DIV><FONT lang=3D3D0 style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff"=3D20 face=3D3D"Times New Roman Special G1" color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D3 =3D BACK=3D3D"#ffffff"=3D20 PTSIZE=3D3D"10" FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT">Wait a minute!&nbsp; I thought the = word =3D "toaster"=3D20 was verboten on this list.&nbsp; Doesn't someone's girdle become = overly=3D20 constrictive every time he hears that word?&nbsp; Y'all get a grip, =3D ok?&nbsp;=3D20 </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Times New Roman Special G1"></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS"></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS"></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS"></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS"></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS"></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT lang=3D3D0 =3D style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff"=3D20 face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D2 BACK=3D3D"#ffffff" = =3D PTSIZE=3D3D"10"=3D20 FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT"> <DIV><BR>today with the toaster,&nbsp;&nbsp; the only service call i =3D have had in=3D20 4 years was.....wait......still thinking......nope none.....<BR>i fixed = =3D the=3D20 screw loosened pedal myself.<BR><BR>never gonna be a good ending to =3D these=3D20 debates.....LOVE THIS LIST.<BR><BR>dale in=3D20 Florida<BR><BR></DIV></FONT></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0CCA_01C44ED7.6B59D100--  
(back) Subject: Re: small pipe organs From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2004 13:02:32 EDT     --part1_12f.43b61f97.2df9ee28_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   i play it i can call it what i want....<G>   it is a Church Organ Sysyems-Prestige II G-404.   3 Manuals, 2 32's, 2 celestes, 8 reeds and A/B voicing.   Lots of organ for a not big price...........   dale in FLorida   --part1_12f.43b61f97.2df9ee28_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><HTML><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 PTSIZE=3D3D10 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" LANG=3D3D"0">i play it i can call = it what i=3D want....&lt;G&gt;<BR> <BR> it is a Church Organ Sysyems-Prestige II G-404.<BR> <BR> 3 Manuals, 2 32's, 2 celestes, 8 reeds and A/B voicing.<BR> <BR> Lots of organ for a not big price...........<BR> <BR> dale in FLorida<BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_12f.43b61f97.2df9ee28_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: small pipe organs From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2004 12:51:24 -0500   At 10:40 AM 6/10/2004, Ray Ahrens wrote: ><?xml:namespace prefix=3D"v" /><?xml:namespace prefix=3D"o" /> >Wait a minute! I thought the word "toaster" was verboten on this >list. Doesn't someone's girdle become overly constrictive every time he >hears that word? Y'all get a grip, ok?     No, Ray, that's on the "other" pipe organ list. <g> Mr. Bellomy doesn't choose to take part in Pipechat, apparently. I guess we're all just to pleasant, friendly, and (most of all) willing to overlook each others use of "non-literally-accurate" terminology for such things from time to time.   Pity....!   Cheers --   Tim Bovard Pipechat Co-Administrator      
(back) Subject: RE: small pipe organs From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2004 14:25:28 -0400   Arie wrote among other things:   Jon,   I don't know where you live, but certainly here in Ontario right now, = there is no one getting rich servicing organs. Most of us, and that isn't many of us, do not drive fancy cars, at least no fancier than pipe organ = service people, do not inhabit prestigious addresses, and probably don't have much in the bank.     Arie V.   Arie: What on heaven and earth are you talking about? Are you referring to = people in the electronic organ business in Ontario, or people in the pipe organ business in Ontario? If it's the former I can't disagree as I have little knowledge concerning it. If it's the latter, you've forgotten about addresses like 1351 Mt. Pleasant Road, Toronto ( yeah, that's prestigious) and cars with funny names like: Jaguar, popular at some time if not now = with another pipe organ service provider in Ontario who happens to live in a = very beautiful and well decorated home in a necessarily rural setting. AjM        
(back) Subject: Long RE: C-C and SCHNITGER in South America From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2004 14:48:04 -0400   Andres Gunther rgunther@cantv.net   Another AGEP! <collective groan>... Since my big historical sagas were mostly published in other List, I want = to make an answer to Malcolm's observations for all pipechatters.   Malcolm wrote:   > I have been aware of at least some of the South American = Cavaill=E9-Colls for > some time. One of the two South American students of Stephen Roberts, of > whom you are aware, Juan Mesa and Gustavo Andres, is from an area quite near > two C-C Organs. I forget whether it is Juan or Gustavo.   Let me submit a little info about this since Stephen Roberts isn't Pipechat member. Juan Mesa is from Chile, which houses some original Cavailles too, including the perhaps only "custom made" C-C of South America; and Gustavo is from Argentina which houses a lot of Mutins (rather than "original" Cavailles). Argentina became a so important client for Charles Mutin in = its time that Mutin even had a *filial workshop* installed in Buenos Aires! In January 2004, Stephen Roberts, Juan Mesa and Gustavo Andres went to Chile and Argentina on a small concert tour. Juan and Gustavo are very promising young men for the organ world and get my dayly prayers and wishes among a lot of other organ people! :)- Since the hands-on task seems to be to re-awake the interest and love for the King of Instruments, people like them are badly needed, I think.   > and now you throw out the news that there is an > Arp Schnitger Organ in Brazil!   It's in the Mariana Cathedral, Minas Gerais, Brazil; restored by R. v. Beckerath. For a time it wasn't sure if it was a "real Schnitger", but research work at the restoration cleared up that indeed it is one. Brazil houses several Cavailles too. My knowledge is only from journal articles, however. Perhaps Domitila could write us a little more first hand info on this...   > My amazement comes from the juxtaposition of > the existence of these instruments against the rather chaotic political > background you describe in many South American countries at this time.   Yes, this is a big paradoxon with a complex background. One reason for that can be found in the fact that South America despite the chaotic situation in many countries is very rich, and the Church is respected excepting temporary prosecutions. Organs often were purchased (or donated) for prestige reasons. Then, the best of the best available on the market = was ordered. And this, in the late 19th cty, surely was an instrument from the prestigious Aristide Cavaille-Coll in Paris!   Somewhat Off Topic: In other areas it's the same; in some countries more, in some = countries less. In Venezuela, we got a nice lot of First Line Grand Pianos. It's = said that in the late 1950's Caracas was the "City of the Cadillacs", and I remember well how many Mercedes Benz were running on our highways in the "Golden seventies". The paradoxon continues! I wrote several times about the political ongoings in my country. Nevertheless, if you come to Caracas you'll find a sloppy but charming city with nice and peaceful people (unless you arrive = at a bad moment alike the riots of past March). Despite all rants against "Mr Bush and The Yankees", an american instructor was hired for the Youth Orchestra's Brass Ensamble training; flights and calls to the USA have preferential rates; Coca-Cola is the preferred drink; and every year new Wendy's, Mac's, Domino's Pizzas open their doors. New malls are inaugurated, and you will ask yourself how the heck came in all these lots of imported goods if the money exchange market is closed and importation only possible with a license; and the use of credit cards abroad only is possible with a government's permission. "The Passion of Jesus Christ" was a Hit, and "The Day after Tomorrow" will be another. You will ask yourself where are the 38% unemployed, the 80% critical poor, the economic breakdown I wrote about. They are there- in the background, and after some time you will find them. Despite all rants against Hi Tech, you can get any device from Home Theatre to Cellular and Internet Service (at wicked prices, however, and = if an artifact fails it must be discarded- forget about claimed guarantees or reliable servicing). How then? I know some of the answers (not to be discussed here), but others are a mystery even for me. South America's problem is less the poverty or economic breakdown but the fact that richness isn't well administrated and distributed. And certainly the distribution doesn't = reach the Organ World. And if an "orgler" doesn't get rich anywhere (I am plenty aware of that), here we are living "at the verge" unless we switch to part-time-orgler status or go away.   Back to topic, Malcolm wrote: > For > Schnitger in the 18th century, and Cavaill=E9-Coll in the 19th to = contract for > the building and transport of these instruments, and to actually set = them up > and get properly compensated for doing so, tells of a rather different sort > of social/political time from that of the present.   Well, the Schnitger is a "unicum". It was brought from Portugal when Brazil was a portugiese colony, as many spanish organs were brought from spain until native artisans were able to build native organs. Minas Gerais then was Brazil's wealthiest region. In "grosso modo view", South America had two great organ periods: the first in Colony times, the second in the second half of the 19th cty. = Then, a fair equilibrium between the organ's owner, the organist, the technician and the budget for all happened. But it didn't last. The first period was shortcutted by Independence wartimes, the second by a decline in church music, ending with the 2nd Vatican Council. About a third Organ Period later... At the present, once an organ is installed or restored, the sponsor feels that his commitment is done. Who plays it? - organists are = underpaid. Efforts to organize recitals face so much trouble, from getting the permission of the parish to raise the money. Who makes the maintenance? - the responsibility is tossed from sponsor to owner and vice versa while = the tech gets moss waiting for a decision and approval of the budget. Domitila pointed that out; I second it. An honourable exception seems to be Mexico! At last minute they = started to rescue their priceless 16th to 18th Cty organs *and* to raise a native organ & organ restoring tradition. Charles Fisk and D.A. Flentrop had a significant role in this history. Lately I was told by my chilean colleague Dr. Carlos Lauterbach that a new effort to awake interest in the organ and to promote organ recitals is started. Chile is on way up after the Pinochet aera, it seems.   > Mind you, Detlef Kleuker > seems to have managed to do this in the 20th century, and he did it = enough > times that one assumes it was made worth his while.   In the second half of the 20th cty, lots of german immigrants and protestantism came to a "booming" South America, and that started the = begin of a third, more sophisticated and less noticeable Organ Aera. Meanwhile organs in RC churches were abandoned after the 2nd Vatican Council, the lutherans bought new organs because they needed them- not for prestige. Since Mr Kleuker manufactured "Tropical Resistant" organs, he was the = first choice. The lutherans promoted organ recitals and concerts in their churches. That happened typically in my country. I am just researching on the history of our D. Kleuker which has 40th anniversary this year. It's astounding how many organ recitals were given = on it, mostly from the late 60's to the mid-80's, and by whom: Ernst Ulrich von Kamecke, Konrad Voppel, Jennifer Bate... not to forget us "native" organists Pablo Castellanos, Jorge Sanchez, a humble servant and his "Junior colleague" Napoleon Savelli.   > And, one needs to > ruminate on how it is that in the 19th century, no one in major cities = in > the U.S. had the smarts or the resources to commission C-C to bring us = an > Organ.   Yes, this is amazing, more that the 1889 C-C catalog lists a lot of organs sent over to "Amerique" (in contrast to "Brezil", Mexique", "Chili" and "Venezuela" a.o.). One explanation could be that in "Amerique" there was a shipping station to other countries... To the other side, the USA had a = lot of native organ builders in that time, as I could see in Orpha Ochse's = book. People perhaps preferred to buy "native" than to import, I guess... more that C-C's were pretty expensive! What's more amazing for me however is that *French Canada* doesn't have a C-C!   +++ Away from this : I am somewhat ashamed about the rant whith which I closed one of my recent AGEPs, but the = panorama really isn't prone to "positive thinking" although I try my best. I = decided to wait until mid-2004 to see if the situation in my country improves, but it didn't. Aside the average troubles, last February my former organ instructor told me: "Forget about the Cavaille-Colls, Andres. We spent millions in their restoration, and then even couldn't give recitals on = them. And if an organist comes from Europe he won't play on an Orgue de Choeur sized instrument, neither lick the parish's boots to get permission for practicing on it". In May I was told that the Concert Organ Project for the Youth = Orchestra Concert Hall will remain a far dream until God alone knows when, due to = the average situation here. That project would have been an opportunity for me to get a training as voicer, a job making the organ case, and later on an income with a maintenance contract. Last Sunday my parish told me that from now on he had to short cut my schedule to 4 days a week because he has no money to pay me. This is the second short cut in a year; until August 2003 I played the dayly Mass 6 = days a week. I never in lifetime believed that it would come down to this point. = The danger lies not in the situation itself but in the 'morale' down. Fortunatedly I got a lot of encouragement by people from the OHS, AIO and the Organ Lists, and that kept me away from giving up more than once and committed me to stand by improving my knowledges. Many, many thanks, last but not least for your patience with my fiendish long writings.   Yours Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.