PipeChat Digest #4561 - Wednesday, June 16, 2004
 
Re: Ocean Grove Review
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Andrew Carnegie and the organ
  by "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net>
Re: Single Expression
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
RE: Single Expression
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Single Expression
  by "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Keilor / St.Paul -Prarie Home
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
Re: Single Expression
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Single Expression
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Felix Hell: Salute to Philadelphia
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net>
Andrew Mills at St. Agnes', New York
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
St. Louis Fox to celebrate its 75-year anniversary [x-posted]
  by "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Ocean Grove Review From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 15 Jun 2004 07:15:45 -0500   I have no idea what his policy is at that particular theater - but I have just always enjoyed and been glad that there is ONE widely popular radio show that showcases a wide variety of folk, ethnic, classical, etc... He has had many groups and individuals perform classical music, including organists. I have heard more than one who where an organist played both classical and theater organ selections and Mr. Keillor fully participated in the vigorous cheering of the audience. Yes - he does occasionally make tongue-in-cheek remarks about music - but then he is a comedian. He show features good music in genres few radio shows give air time - and LOTS of it. Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.   Randolph Runyon wrote: > That would be terrible if true. But, just so we all know who it is we = are > talking about, maybe we should spell his name correctly: Keillor. > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.edu > > > > on 6/14/04 9:16 AM, brade at beveland@millsauto.com wrote: > > >>I once heard that Mr. Keeler is NOT a fan of the organ and forbids its = usage >>in the theatre he owns in St. Paul, MN. Anyone know if this is true? >> >>Brad Eveland >> >> >>Subject: Ocean Grove Review >> >> >> >>>Sadly there was no room for the pipe organ on today's "Prairie Home >>>Companion." >> >>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >> >> > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >     -- Dr. Margo Dillard Organist, FUMC, Lewisville, TX Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano & Organ Studio    
(back) Subject: Andrew Carnegie and the organ From: "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net> Date: Tue, 15 Jun 2004 08:44:24 -0400   Does anyone on this list have access to a complete listing of the pipe organs which received support from Andrew Carnegie? I know there is a microfilm listing at Columbia University, but I'm trying to save myself a trip.   Phil   The Estey Pipe Organ www.esteyorgan.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Single Expression From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 15 Jun 2004 08:06:12 -0500   OK - while we are on this subject - we are currently "shopping" organ builders - and we have had more than one suggest putting only 1 or 2 ranks outside on the wall, and rest of the great and pedal inside the chamber (possibly even under expression). I have only ever played one organ that had that situation (only one rank outside the chamber) many years ago - and in its case, the one rank was SO much LOUDER than the rest of the organ, you could only use it for a "climax" last-note of the postlude kind of stop. Give me some opinions - is this a problem or was it just that organ. Will I be happy if the whole organ is inside a chamber except one pedal principal and one great principal - or will I feel like the rest of the great is in another room??   Thanks, Margo   Andy Lawrence wrote: > I have played and maintained small organs that are entirely in one > expression box. I think its a great idea, when you bring cost savings = into > the equation (when applicable). Sure, it would be nice to have some > unenclosed pipework, too, but often there are major complications to = making > this happen, as in your case. One problem with everything under = expression > is you have no pipe facade. Visual problem only (though you might be = able > to find some attractive pipes to use as dummies). The musical problem = with > it is that you can't significantly change the tone with the swell pedal, = but > only volume. But there will be times when you appreciate being able to > quiet down the whole organ equally. So I wouldn't say its a musical > disadvantage... there are musical advantages and disadvantages. I = wouldn't > worry about it. Even the largest organs have compromises. You have to > balance cost with practicality. > > One of my pet peeves is when builders put part of a rank IN the box, and =   > part of it OUT of the box. I say, if you can't put an entire rank in = the > box, put the whole thing outside. Generally speaking, when split up = this > way, you have to leave the box open if you are using that stop. Very > annoying. > > Andy > > > >>If the ranks are balanced appropriately relatively to each other, do >>you see much of a problem (musically) with having the whole organ >>under single expression? > > >>Thanks, >>Keith > > > > A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service > PO Box 111 > Burlington, VT 05402 > (802)578-3936 > Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >     -- Dr. Margo Dillard Organist, FUMC, Lewisville, TX Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano & Organ Studio    
(back) Subject: RE: Single Expression From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Tue, 15 Jun 2004 11:25:07 -0500   In the current organ at St. James Cathedral in Chicago (mostly E.M. Skinner), there are a few stops at the back of the nave in flower boxes that were added by the Bradford Organ Company when the present instrument was put together and refurbished. When stops from this group are added to a registration during a hymn, they overpower the main organ in the chancel in a most unpleasant way. I don't think you would necessarily have this problem with unenclosed ranks in your church, given that all pipes would be in the same neighborhood, but voicing would need to be sensitive.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Margo Dillard Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2004 8:06 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Single Expression   OK - while we are on this subject - we are currently "shopping" organ=20 builders - and we have had more than one suggest putting only 1 or 2=20 ranks outside on the wall, and rest of the great and pedal inside the=20 chamber (possibly even under expression). I have only ever played one=20 organ that had that situation (only one rank outside the chamber) many=20 years ago - and in its case, the one rank was SO much LOUDER than the=20 rest of the organ, you could only use it for a "climax" last-note of the   postlude kind of stop. Give me some opinions - is this a problem or was   it just that organ. Will I be happy if the whole organ is inside a=20 chamber except one pedal principal and one great principal - or will I=20 feel like the rest of the great is in another room??   Thanks, Margo   Andy Lawrence wrote: > I have played and maintained small organs that are entirely in one=20 > expression box. I think its a great idea, when you bring cost savings into=20 > the equation (when applicable). Sure, it would be nice to have some=20 > unenclosed pipework, too, but often there are major complications to making=20 > this happen, as in your case. One problem with everything under expression=20 > is you have no pipe facade. Visual problem only (though you might be able=20 > to find some attractive pipes to use as dummies). The musical problem with=20 > it is that you can't significantly change the tone with the swell pedal, but=20 > only volume. But there will be times when you appreciate being able to=20 > quiet down the whole organ equally. So I wouldn't say its a musical=20 > disadvantage... there are musical advantages and disadvantages. I wouldn't=20 > worry about it. Even the largest organs have compromises. You have to=20 > balance cost with practicality. >=20 > One of my pet peeves is when builders put part of a rank IN the box, and=20 > part of it OUT of the box. I say, if you can't put an entire rank in the=20 > box, put the whole thing outside. Generally speaking, when split up this=20 > way, you have to leave the box open if you are using that stop. Very=20 > annoying. >=20 > Andy >=20 >=20 >=20 >>If the ranks are balanced appropriately relatively to each other, do=20 >>you see much of a problem (musically) with having the whole organ=20 >>under single expression? >=20 >=20 >>Thanks, >>Keith >=20 >=20 >=20 > A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service > PO Box 111 > Burlington, VT 05402 > (802)578-3936 > Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >=20 >=20 >=20     --=20 Dr. Margo Dillard Organist, FUMC, Lewisville, TX Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano & Organ Studio   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: Re: Single Expression From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 15 Jun 2004 10:32:41 -0700       Margo Dillard wrote: > OK - while we are on this subject - we are currently "shopping" organ > builders - and we have had more than one suggest putting only 1 or 2 > ranks outside on the wall, and rest of the great and pedal inside the > chamber (possibly even under expression). I have only ever played one > organ that had that situation (only one rank outside the chamber) many > years ago - and in its case, the one rank was SO much LOUDER than the > rest of the organ, you could only use it for a "climax" last-note of the =   > postlude kind of stop. Give me some opinions - is this a problem or was =   > it just that organ. Will I be happy if the whole organ is inside a > chamber except one pedal principal and one great principal - or will I > feel like the rest of the great is in another room?? > > Thanks, > Margo >   That was the old style of building -- put a "Titanic Smokestack Scale" Open Diapason outside the chamber or on the facade.   I think it's very useful in a two-manual organ to have a divided Great (or Swell) ... something like this for a small organ:   GREAT   (unenclosed)   8' Open Diapason 4' Octave 2' Fifteenth Mixture   (enclosed, separate box and shoe)   8' Chimney Flute 8' Gemshorn 4' Flute 8' Trumpet or Clarinet   If at least the enclosed section is affected by the Gt/Gt 16 and Gt/Gt 4, that gives you a fairly flexible small "quasi-Choir" division for accompanying, and two enclosed divisions where you can regulate the volume of solo and accompaniment ... that's often a problem with a small organ with a completely unenclosed Great.   BUT ... the stops need to be voiced so that they all balance one another when the box is OPEN.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Keilor / St.Paul -Prarie Home From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jun 2004 15:00:09 EDT   Brad Eveland writes   > Subject: Re: Ocean Grove Review > From: "brade" <beveland@millsauto.com> > Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2004 08:16:27 -0500 > > I once heard that Mr. Keeler is NOT a fan of the organ and forbids its = usage > in the theatre he owns in St. Paul, MN. Anyone know if this is true? > > Brad Eveland   Quite the opposite. Garrison is a MAJOR fan of the Wurlitzer at the Fitzgerald Theatre in St. Paul and, most recently, engaged me to play for = a November broadcast 2 years ago. About 1 week before the event water leaked into = the chambers and damaged the instrument permanently disabling it for broadcast = use. Sad to say nothing has changed since.   Dennis James  
(back) Subject: Re: Single Expression From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jun 2004 15:18:51 -0500   Yep... sounds like you had an old wooly diapason exposed. I think if the scaling and voicing (balance) was appropriate, you would like very much having the open diapason and a pedal principal outside the box and the = rest of the organ inside the box. The only reason I wouldn't do this is if = space didn't allow for it as in the original case in this thread. Having an entire principal chorus outside the box as Bud suggests is even better if space allows. This almost gives you an independent great.   Andy   On Tue, 15 Jun 2004 10:32:41 -0700, Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma = Publications wrote > Margo Dillard wrote: > > OK - while we are on this subject - we are currently "shopping" organ > > builders - and we have had more than one suggest putting only 1 or 2 > > ranks outside on the wall, and rest of the great and pedal inside the > > chamber (possibly even under expression). I have only ever played one =   > > organ that had that situation (only one rank outside the chamber) many =   > > years ago - and in its case, the one rank was SO much LOUDER than the > > rest of the organ, you could only use it for a "climax" last-note of = the > > postlude kind of stop. Give me some opinions - is this a problem or = was > > it just that organ. Will I be happy if the whole organ is inside a > > chamber except one pedal principal and one great principal - or will I =   > > feel like the rest of the great is in another room?? > > > > Thanks, > > Margo > > > > That was the old style of building -- put a "Titanic Smokestack > Scale" Open Diapason outside the chamber or on the facade. > > I think it's very useful in a two-manual organ to have a divided > Great > (or Swell) ... something like this for a small organ: > > GREAT > > (unenclosed) > > 8' Open Diapason > 4' Octave > 2' Fifteenth > Mixture > > (enclosed, separate box and shoe) > > 8' Chimney Flute > 8' Gemshorn > 4' Flute > 8' Trumpet or Clarinet > > If at least the enclosed section is affected by the Gt/Gt 16 and > Gt/Gt 4, that gives you a fairly flexible small "quasi-Choir" > division for accompanying, and two enclosed divisions where you can > regulate the volume of solo and accompaniment ... that's often a > problem with a small organ with a completely unenclosed Great. > > BUT ... the stops need to be voiced so that they all balance one > another when the box is OPEN. > > Cheers, > > Bud   A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Single Expression From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Tue, 15 Jun 2004 16:00:45 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2004 8:06 AM Subject: Re: Single Expression     > OK - while we are on this subject - we are currently "shopping" organ > builders - and we have had more than one suggest putting only 1 or 2 > ranks outside on the wall, and rest of the great and pedal inside the > chamber (possibly even under expression). I have only ever played one > organ that had that situation (only one rank outside the chamber) many > years ago - and in its case, the one rank was SO much LOUDER than the > rest of the organ, you could only use it for a "climax" last-note of the > postlude kind of stop. Give me some opinions - is this a problem or was > it just that organ. Will I be happy if the whole organ is inside a > chamber except one pedal principal and one great principal - or will I > feel like the rest of the great is in another room?? >   It has certainly been the majority opinion at most periods in = organbuilding that at least the Principal chorus on the Great should be unenclosed. In most cases the whole of the Great will be unenclosed. If nothing else the 8' Open Diapason should be unenclosed so that it can be used in solos against the Swell under expression.   The problem arises when the Great is unenclosed and outside the chamber while the rest of the organ is "buried" in a chamber in such a way that = the sound cannot get out. Then you will certainly find that the Great is ridiculously loud in comparison with the rest of the organ. But it is a matter of good organ planning to make sure that that the sound of the = Swell gets out and forms a proper balance with the Great.       John Speller      
(back) Subject: Felix Hell: Salute to Philadelphia From: "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net> Date: Wed, 16 Jun 2004 00:06:44 -0400   There is not much that I can add to Rich Blacklock's review of Felix Hell's concert at Irvine Auditorium. But I am going to add a few observations of my own. Having a bit of a different slant on my approach to organ music being more of a builder than organist, I can say that I have known personally some of the ikons of the organ world, namely E. Power Biggs and Virgil Fox, but have met many others in my duties as service person for the Methuen Organ while at Andover Organ Company as I was always there at recitals.   Felix I am happy to say is now added to that list. I have heard a number of his concerts now, mostly in the New England area, Newark and Philadelphia. I see constant growth in his abilities to interpret and register pieces familiar to him so at each hearing it is a new experience to hear but still maintaining the integrity of the music. I must also add that the organ, recently restored by Austin has not lost the character of the era that it was built in. Felix's approach to the Bach Toccata and Fugue in D minor was definitely a romantic one. The organ is not that well suited for Bach but Felix made the music fit the organ and it was a performance any Fox fan would have been proud of, but with definite Felix touches. This was no imitation. My teacher once said of the Bo=EBllmann Suite Gothique, or as he called it, Suite Antique his teacher really liked it. That was Lynwood Farnam. And yes, my first teacher was a Curtis grad too. I find it always enjoyable and Felix has a flair for it that makes it fresh each time I hear him play it. The rest of the program was excellent also. The Gig Fugue was played as well as any performances I have heard. The organ while loud in the room could also be soft when needed it is a wonderful example of Austin's work of that era and I am pleased they left it as such. It is more than adequate for the room and has many exciting sounds and combinations. After a full day at The Grand Court this organ was refreshing and familiar too. My hat is off to Kimberlee Austin and all involved with its restoration.   I regret that I will not be able to attend the OHS convention, giving me another opportunity to hear Felix. I will however be in Portland, Maine when he plays the Kotzschmar Austin, July 6th, also another Giant of its era and well worth hearing.   Philadelphia was a triumph for the organ on June 12th and for Felix Hell as well. I await, as all his followers do, even greater things from this talented young man.   Cheers,   Mack    
(back) Subject: Andrew Mills at St. Agnes', New York From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 16 Jun 2004 00:53:57 -0400   Wednesday, June 9, 2004. St. Agnes Church, New York   Andrew Mills, Organist.   I'm on the train, heading north for home, after hearing Andrew Mills play = a stunning recital on a happy little Mander , http://www.mander-organs.com/html/st_agnes.html happy because it lives in a superb acoustical environment, and has such a wonderful master. This program was the last in the yearly series of "Rush Hour Concerts," played always at 6:30 p.m., each concert ending with the brief service of Benediction, in which all get to sing the wonderful Benediction hymns (Tantum Ergo and O Salutaris). I have to say that it is particularly fine just entering into the church before each program, and receiving a dose of wonderful incense. This superb series is sponsored in large part by a generous gift from the Bob and Dolores Hope Charitable Foundation - yes, THAT Bob Hope - and also by a generous group of Friends = of Music at St Agnes.   Andrew Mills holds a Bachelor's degree from the North Carolina School of = the Arts and a Master's degree in Organ performance from Catholic University = of America in Washington, DC. He is a regular lecturer at the annual = colloquia of the Church Music Association of America. He has been heard in many = major churches in the U.S. and also at the Church of St. Ignatius in Rome. For eight years, he was Organist and Choirmaster of St. Peter's Church on Capitol Hill in Washingon. I don't recall how many years he has been at = St. Agnes, but I remember letting out a huge cheer when I got word that he had been given the appointment, and that is more than a few years ago. My enthusiasm for Andrew has to do not only with his ability to push down = keys (the right ones, and in the right order), but also the great thought and imagination that goes into his programming. He devotes a lot of "quality time" to this, and every recital is to love and to learn from. To wit:   The evening's program was listed as: "A Tale of Four Centuries." I know = that some there be who would like to forget about the earliest centuries of = Organ music. We read comments on the list about Organists playing "academic" recitals only interesting to "AGO types." Some of us golden oldies = remember an ever-irascible Organ magazine editor from the early to mid 20th century who styled this earlier music "Graveyard Gems," or "Resurrected Relics." I somehow have a volume of Cl=E9rambault which says in large type on its = cover, "Graveyard Gems," taking a little poke at the magazine editor whose = comment it was. In my east end Sunday balcony, I am careful not to have the cover showing on the music desk because it can be read from below. I wished = during Andrew's performance of his first piece that all who dislike or fear this music could only have been at this recital. We heard Fantasia super "Io = son ferito lasso:" fuga quadruplici by Samuel Scheidt (1587-1654), and so compelling was this performance that I do believe it would have convinced even the arch-Virgilian. It was registered gently, in the beginning on two flutes, 8 & 4 from the Great, and with their inherent crescendo in rising lines, the effect was truly lovely. There was a modest crescendo including the addition of some of the quieter reeds, but there was also a crescendo = of sorts involving a wonderful control of touch and an exciting forward = motion, and the climax of the piece was breathtaking.   Here followed Bach Trio Sonata No. 2 in C Minor, my very first trio sonata all those years ago. I find Andrew's approach to this elegant music to be unique, and I think this has to do mostly with touch, with also his gentle and clear approach to registration. This man has total control over the mechanical action of this instrument, and his consistency of articulation = at any speed is really wonderful. It rewards one's close attention. I think = the speed of the first movement was a bit slower than in many performances = (The Master failed to leave us tempo markings!), and because of touch and articulation considerations mentioned above, it was terrifically exciting. The Largo, on the other hand, moved a bit faster than I have heard it, = with a lovely, sweet registration, and it worked. The Allegro received a = virtuoso performance. The registration was the most forceful of the Sonata, but yet had a gentle character.   At my advanced age, Andrew has eradicated yet another great lacuna in my listening experience. Of the Opus 7 Preludes and Fugues of Dupr=E9, the G Minor was the popular choice during my student days and long after. A very few worked up the nerve to play the terrifying B Major, most notably in = the last couple of years, Felix Hell. I have never in all my ?? years heard = the middle one, the F Minor. It is a gentle, contemplative work, full of = beauty and interest, and I feel a bit like Simeon - "For mine ears have 'heard' . = .. .. . " - although I don't feel quite ready to depart in peace. To quote a = bit of Andrew's pleasant note, "Unlike its extrovert neighbours, the F minor = is as mystical and melancholy as the Seine on a foggy winter afternoon."   Within the context of beautifully controlled articulation and phrasing, = the words "heavy fingers" have come to mind often when I have been listening = to Andrew. Let NOT heavy mean ponderous, or anything remotely like that. It's just a beautiful use of the often lost art of the legato, and I am totally beguiled by this playing. In his stirring performance of the Mozart K. 608 = F Minor Fantasia, I thought in places, we perhaps wanted a bit more space between notes, just in this one piece, with its very complex textures = moving at high speed. Also, the building, while not large, has a most generous acoustic. I do not mean to suggest the performance was less than = fulfilling. It was rightly vigorous and exciting all the way. I must quote again from the notes, speaking first of the Floetenuhr, the Organ clock with = automatic player, for which Mozart was writing: "With this 'music box on steroids' = at his disposal, Mozart was limited only by his boundless imagination, and = the mastery of these 'too many notes' with only ten fingers and two feet has been a joyful challenge for Organists ever since."   I will try to carefully note on these lists any future recitals by Andrew Mills, or concerts with his choir. You will be well rewarded, I know.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com                          
(back) Subject: St. Louis Fox to celebrate its 75-year anniversary [x-posted] From: "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jun 2004 22:47:01 -0700   On August 1, the St. Louis Fox Theatre will celebrate its 75-year anniversary with two screenings (2:00 and 7:00 p.m.) of the same film shown when it opened on January 31, 1929: "Street Angel" with Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell (MGM, 1928).   This picture is said to be the first to include a musical soundtrack on the film - hyped "The Wonder of the Ages." (The dialogue was still silent, using subtitles.)   The film's soundtrack will not be used; however. St. Louis Fox house organist and theatre-organ legend Stan Kann will provide the musical accompaniment. (He did not mention whether or not he'll have a 1929 Hoover on the console lift, but don't be surprised if he does!)   The St. Louis Fox has one of five 4/36 "Crawford Special" Wurlitzers [1] and one of only two still in their original location. [2]   Vintage cars will be parked around the theater, and prices will be rolled back to 1925: 75=A2 admission, and 5=A2 prices!   This surely will be a must-not-miss event for those in the St. Louis area. If you do make it, go up to see Stan Kann afterward and tell him Charlie Lester said hello!     ------- [1] Jesse Crawford did not actually design the "Crawford Special" but merely stipulated the inclusion of certain ranks. However, he did have high praise for the specifications.   [2] The other Crawford Special still in its original home is the Detroit Fox instrument.   The first Crawford Special was located in the Paramount Theater in Manhattan and is now in the Century II Exhibition Hall in Wichita, Kansas.   The San Francisco Fox instrument is now in the El Capitan Theater in Hollywood.   The Brooklyn Fox instrument is now in a private residence in Gig Harbor, Washington (this is actually a 37-rank instrument).   The latter three Fox Theaters have all been demolished. Only Detroit and St. Louis remain.   -------   For photos and more info, SEE: http://www.sltos.org/FOX436.htm http://www.michael.leland.name/stl022.htm   -------