PipeChat Digest #4577 - Thursday, June 24, 2004
 
Re: up, down, all around
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Estey "Luminous" Console
  by "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net>
RE:Clergy Funerals / Burial
  by "John Jarvis" <JLJarvis@comcast.net>
Re: up, down, all around
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Amazin' Grace
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Lemare's "Celebrated" Andantino
  by "Will Scarboro" <whs1325@yahoo.com>
RE: Estey console
  by "Harry E. Martenas" <harrym@epix.net>
British Invasion at Bowdoin Street!
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: up, down, all around
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Clergy Funerals / Burial
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Amazin' Grace
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: Amazin' Grace
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: up, down, all around From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 23 Jun 2004 18:15:31 -0400   On 6/23/04 2:20 PM, "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   Bud and Cole: =20   [Bud said:]   > I have to admit that I've never heard the distinction, and I was brought = up on > the tenth edition of "Ritual Notes" and the 1928 edition of Emily Post > (chuckle).   I went running to find mine, and it's not where I thought it was; I think it's newer than (inferior to) yours. ("Ritual Notes," not Emily.) >=20 > Yes, the altar is analagous to the Temple at Jerusalem, and one speaks of > going UP to the ALTAR (at least one DID, until the liturgical deformers p= ulled > it away from the wall and did away with the steps), but I've never heard = of anyone walking UP the aisle.   Well, with all the years you spent in theatre-style protestant auditoria, you can be forgiven for thinking of an entrance procession as "down." >=20 > Alan, perhaps it's a Lut'ren thang? <g> >=20 Is it possible? Did I make this whole thing up? Actually, maybe I unconsciously thought of it as biblocatholic topography! Luther was a Hebrew scholar, while Cranmer could manage "Amen," "Alleluia," and maybe tw= o more words ("Hosanna," "Sabaoth"). So maybe it's just what I thought was "our share" of the "deposit of the faith," to be shared with you A.D. 2004!   Everybody else: Bud and I are great friends (I hope, still!), so don=B9t tak= e this banter too seriously.   In short, though: I don=B9t know. But doesn=B9t it make sense?   Alan              
(back) Subject: Estey "Luminous" Console From: "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net> Date: Wed, 23 Jun 2004 19:14:28 -0400   Karl Watson forwarded the following response to my query.   > That's easy. It's Melchiorre Mauro-Cottone. Hope I spelt that right. = I > think the instrument is a cinema job, maybe in NYC. I saw this picture = in > my teachers old (1920's) American Organist magazines when I was a kid.   In doing my research, I find that it was for a large Estey in New York's Capital Theater.   If you will check on my website, you'll find several pictures of these = "cash register" consoles....look under "Models" and also on the Opus List # = 2043, the National Cash Register Company's Estey in Dayton, OH.   I'm quite sure they were developed by William Haskell to be the "latest = and most modern", though I believe they had mechanical problems with them. I think it's interesting that this type of console was used in the 1920's, = and nowadays one sees them as a very modern and "high-tech" type of console.   I've just put up a "quick" page at Opus 1710 telling a bit more about the organ and Mauro-Cottone.   Phil Stimmel   The Estey Pipe Organ www.esteyorgan.com      
(back) Subject: RE:Clergy Funerals / Burial From: "John Jarvis" <JLJarvis@comcast.net> Date: Wed, 23 Jun 2004 17:00:22 -0700   I find all of this discussion about various funeral traditions very interesting. I do have a question to my Roman Catholic friends on this = list - why do you find dead clergy laid out in the bottom portion of an altar where all can see them for the rest of time? I first noticed this in = St. Peters when I visited the Vatican as a teen and have since seen this practice in many places in mostly South America. It was especially sad = to see women kneeling at these altars kissing the ring of the dead person through the glass. What is the purpose and meaning of this tradition? =20    
(back) Subject: Re: up, down, all around From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 24 Jun 2004 09:02:11 +0800   The expression "walking UP the aisle " is quite commonly used in = Australia. I have never heard it put any other way. However I have also heard "DOWN the aisle" too. There doesn't appear to = be any way considered to be correct here as far as I can see. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, June 24, 2004 2:20 AM Subject: up, down, all around     > I have to admit that I've never heard the distinction, and I was brought > up on the tenth edition of "Ritual Notes" and the 1928 edition of Emily > Post (chuckle). > > Yes, the altar is analagous to the Temple at Jerusalem, and one speaks > of going UP to the ALTAR (at least one DID, until the liturgical > deformers pulled it away from the wall and did away with the steps), but > I've never heard of anyone walking UP the aisle. > > Alan, perhaps it's a Lut'ren thang? <g> > > Cheers, > > Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Amazin' Grace From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 24 Jun 2004 09:03:36 +0800   And the Lord's Prayer to "Auld Lang Syne" as per Cliff Richards. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "M Collins" <mcoll@panix.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, June 24, 2004 12:46 AM Subject: Re: Amazin' Grace     > On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 ContraReed@aol.com wrote: > > And you do know you can also sing > > Amazing Grace to the "Mickey Mouse March??? > > > > And the Doxology to "Hernando's Hideaway" from "The > Pajama Game". > > --- MJC >  
(back) Subject: Lemare's "Celebrated" Andantino From: "Will Scarboro" <whs1325@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 23 Jun 2004 18:17:22 -0700 (PDT)   There was a previous discussion about the origins of this piece a few = months back. I quote my own message on the subject. "Edwin Lemare wrote his Andantino in D-flat in 1892. It was one of his = first published compositions for organ. Published by Robert Cocks & Co. in = 1892. With the expiration of the original copyright Lemare prepared an = "improved" version of it that was published by Foster Music in 1924. The = copy with the pedal half notes and half rests is the earlier of the two = versions. Both versions represent Lemare's interpretation of his own work. =   Later on the advice of his wife Charlotte, he made an effort to get it = published as a waltz. Even though his own attempts were not entirely = successful, in 1925 Lemare gave permission to the firm of Villa Moret to = use his melody in connection with a song called "Moonlight and Roses", and = the rest is history." The reason it is referred to as the "celebrated" Andantino is because = Lemare's piece was one of the most popular piece of organ music play = during the early 20th century. There was hardly ever a recital that Lemare = wasn't compelled by the audience to play his Andantino. One need only read = the long section about the piece in Lemare's book "Organs I have met" to = understand the full meaning and impact of this piece on member of the = general public. Now to tackle another angle to this story. I have heard the story about = Lemare getting angry about people putting words to his music but I have = never found any evidence to substantiate that story. Even Lemare himself = was trying to make his tune a song upon the suggestion of his wife. He = later gave his permission for others to do so. All of this comes from = Lemare's own pen. While he wasn't mad about the tune getting words, he did = get angry whenever he heard the Andantino being "jazzed up" by a "hot = music" band. He utterly despised "jazzed" music. Anyway, this topic shows us very well how much interesting history can be = behind one song. I hope this helps to answer your questions. Will Scarboro     --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - Send 10MB messages!
(back) Subject: RE: Estey console From: "Harry E. Martenas" <harrym@epix.net> Date: Wed, 23 Jun 2004 21:59:46 -0400   I believe the biggest problem was when the lamps underneath the stop controls burned out, there was no way to know whether a stop was turned on or off.   Rich Lavoie (don't know if he was ever on this list, he was once on piporg-l) was part of the effort to save a large concert Estey in Sacramento (opus 2526 spec here: http://www.esteyorgan.com/Opus2526.html). He told me that it still has its luminous stop console, although there was discussion about adding a second console with all the modern playing aids.   Does Phil Stimmel or anyone else have any current information on this organ?   Harry      
(back) Subject: British Invasion at Bowdoin Street! From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 23 Jun 2004 22:27:16 EDT   Dear List,   The Church of St. John the Evangelist, 35 Bowdoin Street, Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts, will host the following concerts next week:   On Monday, 28 June at 8PM, the Choir of Christ College, Cambridge (UK) = will present works by CHH Parry, Faure and Kodaly. Ticket prices $18/$14. This = is their first concert in New England for a long while, I'm told. Not to be = missed.   On Tuesday, 29 June at 7:30 PM the Choir and Orchestra of the Imperial Medical School, London, will present works by Bach, Parry and Mozart's = Coronation Mass. Ticket prices to $20, discounts for medical professionals and = students.   Please see www.stjohnsbowdoinst.org for directions and parking info. = Tickets may be had in advance by contacting the Parish Office.   Hope to see some of you Yanks there!   Pax, Bill H. SJE, Boston.  
(back) Subject: Re: up, down, all around From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 24 Jun 2004 00:43:13 -0500   As far as I know here in Central Illinois, fathers walk their daughters down the aisle and the bride and groom walk down the aisle. Seems silly, but that's what I've heard. Alicia Zeilenga   -----Original Message----- From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>   > The expression "walking UP the aisle " is quite commonly used in > Australia. > I have never heard it put any other way. > However I have also heard "DOWN the aisle" too. There doesn't appear > to be > any way considered to be correct here as far as I can see. > Bob Elms.      
(back) Subject: Re: Clergy Funerals / Burial From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 24 Jun 2004 02:20:58 EDT   Dear J L Jarvis: =20 In the way you describe the situation, I would bet that those in glass cofi= ns are known as incorruptables. The body remains, fresh and supple, long after dissolution and desiccation of the body to bones and dust should have taken place. It's considered a miracle and only occurs with Saintly Souls. There =20= is no preservatives administered to the body. Many have been buried under harsh conditions, with quick lime thrown on the body. Many have been=20 buried under these conditions for several decades. If you are at all curiou= s about The Incorruptables there is a comprehensive book by TAN press by that title authored by Joan Carroll Cruz. Pope John XXIII seems to be the latest example. His body was carried through St. Peter's Square as late as 2002 viewed by several thousand people. It is totally intact. The=20 faithful often venerate these relics and receive cures from terminal diseas= es and other favors. There are well over 125 of these and have been in this =20 state for 100's of years. Bernadette of Lourdes is displayed in a convent in Pari= s, France. She only appears to have fallen asleep. Interesting stuff, and just=20 adds to the wonder and glory of God. =20 Ron Severin =20 =20 I find all of this discussion about various funeral traditions very=20 interesting. I do have a question to my Roman Catholic friends on this lis= t =E2=80=93 why do=20 you find dead clergy laid out in the bottom portion of an altar where all=20 can see them for the rest of time? I first noticed this in St. Peters when= I =20 visited the Vatican as a teen and have since seen this practice in many=20 places in mostly South America. It was especially sad to see women kneeli= ng at=20 these altars kissing the ring of the dead person through the glass. What i= s=20 the purpose and meaning of this tradition? JL Jarvis  
(back) Subject: Re: Amazin' Grace From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Thu, 24 Jun 2004 15:30:10 +0800   Amazing Grace to Theme from Gilligan's Island.   What is that 8.6.8.6 meter?   ----- Original Message ----- From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>   > And the Lord's Prayer to "Auld Lang Syne" as per Cliff Richards. > Bob Elms. > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "M Collins" <mcoll@panix.com> > > > > > And you do know you can also sing > > > Amazing Grace to the "Mickey Mouse March??? > > > > And the Doxology to "Hernando's Hideaway" from "The > > Pajama Game". > > > > --- MJC -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   -- _______________________________________________ Talk More, Pay Less with Net2Phone Direct(R), up to 1500 minutes free! http://www.net2phone.com/cgi-bin/link.cgi?143          
(back) Subject: Re: Amazin' Grace From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 24 Jun 2004 03:39:27 EDT   Dear Jan: 86 86 meter tells us the number of syllables per line of verse. It also makes it possible to substitute a different tune of the same meter to the verses. Ron Severin