PipeChat Digest #4580 - Saturday, June 26, 2004
 
40 Years Kleuker Organ of german LC Part 04
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <rgunther@cantv.net>
Organs and Organists online
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Re: up, down, all around
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Clergy Funerals / Burial
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: Funerals / Burial
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Funerals / Burial
  by "Milo R. Shepherd" <mrstwin2@cox.net>
Royal Albert Hall Organ Inaugural Concert
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Royal Albert Hall Organ Inaugural Concert
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Royal Albert Hall Organ Inaugural Concert
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
RE: up, down, all around
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Anglican Funeral Rites
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: up, down, all around
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
American Presidential Visit
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: 40 Years Kleuker Organ of german LC Part 04 From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 07:49:44 -0400   40 Years Kleuker Organ of La Resurrecci=F3n LC, Caracas, Part 04 LITURGICAL ORGANISTS IN "LA RESURRECCION" LUTHERAN CHURCH:   No lutheran worship can exist without music. Due to this fact the world = was gifted with a Buxtehude and a Bach- to name only the most famous. The German Preacher Congregation in Caracas carried on this tradition from its beginning on. It is documented that in the late 19th/early 20th = century the congregation already had a choir, a small orchestra and a reed organ. Despite all difficulties it seems to be they had a relative active music life. When the congregation was rejoined in 1951 an organist and cantor, Mr. Werner Gunther, father of this humble Servant, was hired and put in charge of the church music affairs. He founded the choir, which, with some interruptions, carries his activities on to these present days as "Coro = San Miguel". My father left the position in 1956.   Mrs. Ruth Gosewinkel was my father's succesor. She became a most important figure in Venezuela's music history; I wrote extensively about her career = in the Organ History of Venezuela. She re-founded the chamber orchestra and started the Christmas Church Concerts which became a tradition. As noted, she was in direct charge of the organ design and building supervision, and the first organist to play on it. On January 1st 1965 she resigned because she had to raise her children and considered that the new instrument was worth a more professional trained organist (Mrs Gosewinkel was mostly = choir conductor). But she remained in contact with the Congregation through the "Musica Antiqua" Music Association she founded- most founding members were germans and congregation members.   For more than a year the music in the congregation was in charge of Mrs. Emma Baader. In September 1966 a young organist and cantor, Mr. Christian Grundmann, arrived from Germany and took over the position. He founded a children's choir and organized many church concerts and organ recitals. In 1969 his contract expired, and again the music was in charge of Mrs Emma Baader until 1970 when the US-american organist Ms. Linda Ellington was hired. She played for a year, and in 1971 Prof. Yannis Ioannidis took over the position until 1976.   For two years from 1976 to 1978 the church music was in charge of diverse people who had more good will than professional knowledge. In 1978, by reccomendation of Mrs Gosewinkel and Prof Ernst Ulrich von Kamecke (Church Music Director of St Petri Church in Hamburg) a young german-brazilian organist, Ms. Ursula Maria Penner, was hired. Due to the fact that these were the "Golden Seventies" there were enough people and money available = for music activities and that enabled Ms Penner to organize a very active = music program. She gave one organ recital each month (at the last wednesday) and Pastor Kropatschek who was in charge of the Congregation at that time founded a Posaun choir and the church choir was rejoined to new activity too. In 1980 Ms Penner edited a casette with recorded pieces on the organ.   In June 1981 Rvd. Kropatschek and Miss Penner left the congregation. Fortunatedly, Rvd Wolfgang Storch, the new Pastor, was another music enthusiast. Church music as well as the monthly "Evening music" on each = last wednesday continued under the direction of the new Director of Music, = U.S.- american organist Stephanie Duncan. Since Mrs Duncan was no choirmaster, Rvd. Storch took over the choir at amateur level, and "Musica Antiqua" association helped out a lot although in September 1979 Mrs. Ruth = Gosewinkel had died. Things went that way until Mrs. Duncan left in 1984 and Mr. Christian Grundmann, who had married and remained in Venezuela all these years, was put in charge again- until this very day, with Rafael Andres Gunther in charge as auxiliar organist and maintenance of the two organs.   In 1985, "Musica Antiqua" was dissolved, and members of the former association continued the music activities in the congregation under the conduction of Pastor Wolfgang Storch until 1986. After Rvd. Storch went = back to Germany, Mr. Grundmann conducted the choir and orchestra until January 1996. A highlight was the Church Concert at the congregation's 100th anniversary in 1993 in the course of which Mr. Christian Grundmann, demonstrated the resources of the organ with a performance of Cesar = Franck's Chorale # 3. In January 1996 Mr Grundmann left the choir activity but remained as organist. From 1996 to 2001 this humble servant was = choirmaster, and from 2001 to the present day the choir is conducted by Mr. Napoleon Savelli, who started anew the traditional Christmas Concerts.   The german lutheran "St Michael's Congregation" always pursued three main goals outside the Pastorate for the german protestants in Caracas: Ecumenism, Social Welfare and Church Music activities. After 1983 and = 1989, the increasingly critical economic and political situation of the country caused a shift from Cultural Activities to Social Welfare in the congregation's priorities. After 2001 the situation in Venezuela = constitutes a handicap to planning and organizing music activities in advance, outside the fact that the increasing emmigation of congregation members to one = side and the aging of the remaining congregation members to the other side puts = a great questioning sign on a prospective future. Nevertheless Mr Grundmann, Mr Savelli and myself do our best to keep the organs in good condition and the church music above the minimum acceptable level at a minimum = [sometimes no] cost. I have to admit however that this often becomes a quite hard = task which demands a lot of time and nerves from all of us.   I cannot close this installment without mentioning Mrs. Irene Ebersteins, who since 1951 is Organist in charge for the spanish, scandivian, lettish and hungarian congregations who share the Center, although Prof. Miguel Castillo Didier was organist of the spanish congregation (named "La Reforma") from 1976 to 1980, when Mrs Ebersteins took over again. The scandinavian and lettish congregations merged into the german or spanish congregation in the last years. In Fall 2001 the Hungarians hired Napoleon Savelli as organist; but Mrs. Ebersteins is still in charge as organist of the spanish congregation "La Reforma". With 91 years of age and 53 years = at His service this can be considered a true record!   In the next (and last) installment I will write about the organists who = gave recitals on the Kleuker in all these years. Stay tuned...   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.      
(back) Subject: Organs and Organists online From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 15:52:36 +0300   Dear group, This is to let you know about a new website I have put up in collaboration with organist Timothy Grenz. It is called organs and organists online and can be reached by clicking on http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ It replaces the very limited "organuploads" group on Yahoo. Some of you who = are members of other lists may have already seen this notice ; it is a bit = late arriving here due to a Yahoo UK server problem which the list has been = told about. There are, of course, many websites now with downloadable organ music on them, but I think I can claim that this is the first one which offers both upload and download facilities for members. Its aims and activities are summarised on the site, but briefly it allows the public to download organ recordings and members to upload organ recordings and performances, preferably their own and not in breach of copyright. Also welcome are photographs and articles about organs of interest. It is a service = available free to anyone - you do not have to be a member to download the files, though membership (free) is required for uploads. Since going online just over three weeks ago we have had over 1,100 hits and nearly 500 hits on = the downloads page. At present there are 36 files, mostly pipe organs. If you wish to download files use the RIGHT CLICK on your mouse and "save target as". They are all complete performances - no irritating samples! It is a new site and, as it is comprehensive, there may be a few teething problems, but enough is up and working to make it a viable operation. It includes performances on a number of different pipe and electronic organs, such as St Paul's, Covent Garden, The Royal Albert hall, London, The = III/44 Holtkamp organ in St. John Vianney Catholic Church, Rancho Cordova, CA, Graham Blyth playing the 3 manual Veritas Digital organ he designed and installed in Buffalo, New York, Stephen Hamill at a 4 manual Phoenix organ in Ireland, Tim Grenz's Cantor House Organ and my Vicount/Ahlborn house organ. The downloads will be added to regularly. Since originally writing this we have added several new files, including a performance of the Bach Fantasia in G minor played by 14 year old = Norwegian organist Jarle Fagerheim recorded live 2 years ago in a concert when he = was 12 and several Dutch organs played by Aarnoud de Groen as well as Gregory Ceurvorst at the Martin Ott organ Op. 17, Boutell Memorial Concert Hall, Northern Illinois University, De Kalb, IL (Bach D major Prelude) and the Aeolian-Skinner organ in Alice Millar Chapel, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. The accent is on the use of the organ as a musical instrument, and to this end I should like to have a representative collection of as many = different organs as possible, particularly with a view to showing their capabilities in performance of organ music of all periods and types. There are also articles, photos and stop lists of organs in the UK, Germany, Holland and France. These will be added to regularly - we would like to have an = American and an Australian section, and are open to further suggestions. I would like to invite your contributions of photographs, articles and = performances on pipe, digital and theatre organs. In addition to the major organs already listed, other lesser known but unusual instruments would also be welcome. I would like to thank David Scribner and Tim Bovard, owners of Pipe Chat, for allowing me to publicise this site. John Foss      
(back) Subject: Re: up, down, all around From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 08:57:36 -0400   On 6/24/04 7:53 PM, "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> wrote:   > I think most often the alter table, if there is one, is raised on a = platform.   I think you're right. It may not be a HIGH platform, but at least a step = or two up; maybe three--depending on the size of the room.   > More than a few chuches have taken to building facilities with "stadium > seating." Ostensibly it gives the congregation a better view of the = pulpit, > but to my mind makes the whole worship service more of a theater = production. > Moreso when a "rock" band is included with drums (usually a Roland = V-drum kit) > featured prominantly in the center position. I'm not averse to this = seating > arrangement, though my own church, www.deltaoaks.org, is worshipping in = a > (very nice) flat-floored gynmasium of an SDA school.   Frankly, I think your arrangement sounds just fine. It offers the fact = that it's quite flexible; you can "re-arrange" things much more easily than in = a room where the layout (and elevations) are pre-determined by the = "structure" of the room. I looked at the photos on your website, and it seems to me that you make GOOD use of the flexibility your room offers. > > No confusion was intended ... just an observation that the worship > "experience" has changed in many denominations over the years. > And that's for sure.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Clergy Funerals / Burial From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 10:06:59 EDT   At almost every funeral for which I played in Oklahoma, unless requested = by the family, the casket was left open until time for the funeral, closed = with flowers put on top, and after the sermon the flowers were removed and the = casket opened. Then everyone but the family walked by to get their last look at = the body. After they were outside the family all went to the casket, = sometimes with hysterical crying. Then they were seated while the minister talked = to them for a few minutes. That was when I quit playing the Postlude. One = funeral home requested I play The Lord's Prayer during the time people were = viewing the body. Most of the people waited in the foyer for the family to pay = their respects and then go to the cemetery, which was directly across the street = from my former church. This has been over a period of over 50 years and the = last funeral for which I played this was the procedure. The order of service = was usually the same: Prelude from the time the first person sat (usually 30 = minutes before the service), at the appointed time the pastor and/or pastors came = in and the soloist sang the first song. Then the eulogy and another song, = then the sermon, another song, followed by the Postlude and viewing of the = body. Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: Funerals / Burial From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 12:49:21 -0400   On 6/25/04 10:06 AM, "OMusic@aol.com" <OMusic@aol.com> wrote:   > after the sermon the flowers were removed and the casket opened. Then > everyone but the family walked by to get their last look at the body. Af= ter > they were outside the family all went to the casket, sometimes with hyste= rical > crying. Then they were seated while the minister talked to them for a fe= w > minutes. That was when I quit playing the Postlude. One funeral home > requested I play The Lord's Prayer during the time people were viewing th= e > body. Most of the people waited in the foyer for the family to pay their > respects and then go to the cemetery   I have the feeling, Les, that that procedure would have the effect (intende= d or not) of =B3undoing=B2 the good work of the sermon and the music and the scripture, and that it would be so much more spiritually =B3healthy=B2 for ALL the above to happen, indeed, if desired (as described by you), but for all of it to be OVER WITH BEFORE the service itself (which includes the interment across the street). How would you feel about that?   Alan  
(back) Subject: RE: Funerals / Burial From: "Milo R. Shepherd" <mrstwin2@cox.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 12:57:47 -0400   Re: Funerals / BurialIn LDS/Mormon funerals, there is a view 1 hour before the actual start of the service. Just before the service starts, there is = a family prayer and one final goodbye before the coffin is closed. During = the service the coffin is closed. There are occasions where it might be = opened up due to a family member arriving late but that takes place after the service (my cousin arrived late for my grandfather's funeral, so the = coffin was opened for him to see him one last time). Otherwise its a very upbeat and forward looking service as it is pointed out that we have to look at = the eternal nature and not the immediate present in all this.   Just thought you would like to know.   Milo -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Alan Freed Sent: Friday, June 25, 2004 12:49 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Funerals / Burial     On 6/25/04 10:06 AM, "OMusic@aol.com" <OMusic@aol.com> wrote:     after the sermon the flowers were removed and the casket opened. Then everyone but the family walked by to get their last look at the body. = After they were outside the family all went to the casket, sometimes with hysterical crying. Then they were seated while the minister talked to = them for a few minutes. That was when I quit playing the Postlude. One = funeral home requested I play The Lord's Prayer during the time people were = viewing the body. Most of the people waited in the foyer for the family to pay their respects and then go to the cemetery     I have the feeling, Les, that that procedure would have the effect (intended or not) of =93undoing=94 the good work of the sermon and the = music and the scripture, and that it would be so much more spiritually =93healthy=94 = for ALL the above to happen, indeed, if desired (as described by you), but for all of it to be OVER WITH BEFORE the service itself (which includes the interment across the street). How would you feel about that?   Alan  
(back) Subject: Royal Albert Hall Organ Inaugural Concert From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 14:33:48 -0400   I listened this afternoon to John Mander being interviewed on BBC Radio 3, =   - it was really quite interesting to hear about the organ restoration from =   the restorer's own thoughts.   I have also found out that the Inaugural Concert, which is tomorrow = evening in London, will be broadcast on BBC Radio 3 on Wednesday July 14th at 19.30 GMT. Make a note of the date and time, but remember that it is at British Time, make your own adjustment. Here in EST it will be on at 4.30 = pm.   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Royal Albert Hall Organ Inaugural Concert From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 14:38:53 -0400   I listened this afternoon to John Mander being interviewed on BBC Radio 3, =   - it was really quite interesting to hear about the organ restoration from =   the restorer's own thoughts.   I have also found out that the Inaugural Concert, which is tomorrow = evening in London, will be broadcast on BBC Radio 3 on Wednesday July 14th at 19.30 GMT.   Listeners abroad can access the Radio 3 live stream via the Radio 3 web site at www.bbc.co.uk/radio3   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Royal Albert Hall Organ Inaugural Concert From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 15:58:00 -0400   Roger Evans has pointed out that 19.30 London time is 2.30 pm here in the Eastern Daylight Time zone,   Thanks for correcting my mistake Roger, and I agree with you that it would =   be best to check the time nearer to the actual date!   Bob Conway     I listened this afternoon to John Mander being interviewed on BBC Radio 3, - it was really quite interesting to hear about the organ restoration from the restorer's own thoughts.   I have also found out that the Inaugural Concert, which is tomorrow = evening in London, will be broadcast on BBC Radio 3 on Wednesday July 14th at 19.30 GMT.   Listeners abroad can access the Radio 3 live stream via the Radio 3 web site at www.bbc.co.uk/radio3   Bob Conway   :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Note: opinions expressed on PIPORG-L are those of the individual con- tributors and not necessarily those of the list owners nor of the Uni- versity at Albany. For a brief summary of list commands, send mail to listserv@listserv.albany.edu saying GET LSVCMMDS.TXT or see the web page at http://www.albany.edu/piporg-l/lsvcmmds.html . ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::    
(back) Subject: RE: up, down, all around From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 16:27:35 -0500   That puts a whole new spin on worship, doesn't it? Wonder if God would walk out early on some of our performances?   I'd like to have the job doing the yada-yada thing, just to try it out. Of course, my definition of yada yada may be different.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Cole   If there is an "audience" in our worship, it has to be the Lord God Almighty, n'est-ce pas? The people are the players, and the priest and/or verger is (are) the director(s). Of course, the organist provides the music, and the sexton is the yada yada yada . . . .          
(back) Subject: Re: Anglican Funeral Rites From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 18:04:33 -0400   I'm out of town on a choir tour right now, ao I'm just catching up on = reading posts, but I just read a post about not knowing which way the = casket was placed in a church.   We funeral directors know which way the casket was placed in the casket = because the casket of a lay person is always brought in a church feet = first and is brought out of the church feet first. How do we know which = end is the foot end? Well, the hinges for the lid are on the back side, = the lock for the sealing machanism on metal caskets is always on the foot = end, and if all else fails, the manufacturer's brand name label is always = at the foot end.   When a flag is on a casket, as was on the President's casket, the blue = field, is always on the left side of the chest, over the heart, and the = stripes are over the foot end of the casket, so it's easy to tell.   In a liturgical setting, when the feet are to the altar, rather than = perpendicular (as in non-liturgical settings), the casket is usually = turned before bringing it out of the church.   Ok, back to organic topics....   I played the old (early 1990's) Rodgers pipe/electronic combo organ = yesterday at Brentwood Baptist in Houston as part of our choir tour. It = had some interesting sounds on it, but it sure was a loud organ! I was = hoping to be able to sneak over to 2nd Baptist, but didn't have time, = since I had limited rehearsal time and was at the mercy of the church's = minister of music for transportation, AND I wanted to do some shopping at = the Houston Galleria!   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: up, down, all around From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 16:30:07 -0600   Hello, PipeChatters:   Keeping things in perspective is one of our greatest challenges, for when we lose sight of reality as God see it (us) from the edge of eternity, we lose everything worth while.   With our world knowingly in turmoil (on-going situation for most people), let's use our bandwidth to uplift, wherever possible.   F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs   ..   Subject: RE: up, down, all around     > That puts a whole new spin on worship, doesn't it? > Wonder if God would walk out early on some of > our performances?   I doubt it. He looks at the play from the very edge of eternities past, present, and future, and knows the ultimate outcome of our triviality.   > I'd like to have the job doing the yada-yada thing, just to try it out. > Of course, my definition of yada yada may be different. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > Cole > > If there is an "audience" in our worship, it has to be the Lord God > Almighty, n'est-ce pas? The people are the players, and the priest > and/or > verger is (are) the director(s). Of course, the organist provides the > music, and the sexton is the yada yada yada . . . . >      
(back) Subject: American Presidential Visit From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Sat, 26 Jun 2004 09:54:44 +0100   Dear American Friends,   I see from a flyer included in my RCO literature that Frederick Swann, President of the American Guild of Organists (but then, you knew that already), is included in the recitalists at the Summer Organ Festival at Westminster Abbey.   Tuesday 3rd August - 7:00pm Bingham - Bells of Riverside Franck - Choral (B min) Huston - Prelude Langlais - Hymne Vierne - Choral (II) Wright - Rhapsody Bales - Suite Duruffle - Meditation Parry - Fantasia & Fugue   Admission =A310   So then, i) what do you think of the programme ? & ii) is the admission charge similar to your usual 'at home' rates ?   Harry Grove [a.k.a. musicman]