PipeChat Digest #4583 - Tuesday, June 29, 2004
 
Stopped String
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
RE: Anglican funeral rites
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: up, down, all around
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: Clergy Funerals / Burial
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Stopped String
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
RE: up, down, all around
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Clergy Funerals / Burial
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: up, down, all around
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
consecrating an altar
  by "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: up, down, all around
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
POE In Illinois (X-Posted)
  by <Devon3000@aol.com>
RE: POE In Illinois (X-Posted)
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: POE In Illinois (X-Posted)
  by "Scott" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Re: up, down, all around
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: up, down, all around
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Anglican funeral rites
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
ATOS Convention (x-posted)
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: up, down, all around
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
ATOS Convention
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: Stopped String From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 09:30:32 -0400   Chatters,   Is there any such thing as a stopped string? I've thought that the = slots at the open end of the pipe contribute a great deal to the = "stringiness" of the pipes. Of course, the scale, cutup, and structure = of the mouth contribute.   I guess, what happens when you stop a pipe that is scaled as a string?   Thanks, Keith
(back) Subject: RE: Anglican funeral rites From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 09:30:43 -0400   > Some funeral directors do, but I don't think it's a churchwide thing. = The idea is=20 that if the Rapture occurs in that very moment, the dead pastor can = stand up and=20 continue his preaching and exhorting, and if it's a lay person, that = person can join=20 the congregation as the presiding pastor switches gears from a funeral = rite to a=20 Eucharistic rite, I guess.   This is also the custom in Anglo-Catholic churches, although we don't = believe in the rapture. I think that the idea with us is simply that a = priest dutifully faces his people even in death. If anyone else knows = more about the reason for this custom in liturgical circles, I'd be = interested to know.    
(back) Subject: RE: up, down, all around From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 09:40:34 -0400   > Yes, the altar is analagous to the Temple at Jerusalem, and one = speaks=20 of going UP to the ALTAR (at least one DID, until the liturgical=20 deformers pulled it away from the wall and did away with the steps), = but=20 I've never heard of anyone walking UP the aisle.   Aren't there also churches in which the "aisle" slopes downward slightly = towards the front, to encourage people in that direction, especially = during altar calls? This phenomenon is never found in Episcopal = churches, hence our congregants' reputation (lacking such encouragement) = for preferring the back pews.   I've read, too, that to be really correct the "aisle" should be called = the pace. An aisle is one of the outer, more low-ceilinged, vessels = alongside the main nave in a large gothic, romanesque etc. building.=20    
(back) Subject: RE: Clergy Funerals / Burial From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 10:09:00 -0400   > why do you find dead clergy laid out in the bottom portion of an altar = where all can see them for the rest of time? =20   It derives from early times, when congregations met in the Roman = catacombs and used sarcophogi as altars. To this day, many Catholic = altars (or all of them?) should contain a relic of a saint underneath a = slab of stone in the middle, where the paten and chalice are placed = during mass. There's probably more to it than that, and I too would be = interested in further details.   A few summers ago I was the accompanist for an American choir on a = European tour. One of our performances was in the Dreifaltigkeitskirche = in Salzburg. This is a lovely seminary church in baroque architecture, = not large but lofty with a dome, hence beautiful acoustics, and a small = but exuberant organ by Hradetzky that I distinctly remember was a joy to = play.=20   Another distinct memory is of skulls visibly interred in at least two of = the church's several altars. We moderns consider this to be morbid, but = perhaps we are the ones with the peculiar views. Skulls are facts. = They are remnants of human bodies. "Remember, man, that you are dust = and unto dust you shall return." Devout people used to keep skulls in = their homes to help them remember this. Nowadays, by contrast, our = culture feels an obsessive-compulsive need to *hide* death and = everything connnected with it. That compulsion is neither Christian, = natural, nor realistic.      
(back) Subject: Re: Stopped String From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 10:29:33 -0500   > Keith Zimmerman wrote: > Chatters, > Is there any such thing as a stopped string? I've thought that > the slots at the open end of the pipe contribute a great deal > to the "stringiness" of the pipes. Of course, the scale, > cutup, and structure of the mouth contribute.   The closest thing would be Haskell-type or "Spanish miter" construction, which can do a reasonably convincing job of replicating the sound of an open metal string pipe.   In 19th Century tracker work, the typical practice was to employ what was known as "common basses". This technique employed the Stopped Diapason bass octave on its own drawstop to provide "something down there". By the turn-of-the-century, depending upon the builder, this had progressed to "poop" basses (I have NO idea where that term came from!), consisting of an octave of Quintadena pipes. Sometimes, the change-over point from Quintadena to open metal pipes would be lower than Tenor C; such as GG, if Swell box height permitted it without an unreasonable amount of mitering needed.   The general reason for these kinds of substitute basses was due to restricted height and to prevent the over-use of conventional mitering.   > I guess, what happens when you stop a pipe that is scaled as a > string?   It becomes a Quintadeen! Faithfully,   G.A. -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO <>< Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS  
(back) Subject: RE: up, down, all around From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 29 Jun 2004 04:28:02 +1200   >> Yes, the altar is analagous to the Temple at Jerusalem, and one speaks of going UP to the ALTAR (at least one DID, until the liturgical deformers pulled it away from the wall and did away with the steps), but I've never heard of anyone walking UP the aisle.   If I remember correctly, it was me who used the expression "up" about a fortnight ago, beginning this thread. Here in NZ, it is common to hear people walking "up" to the front of the church.   >Aren't there also churches in which the "aisle" slopes downward slightly towards the front, to encourage people in that direction, especially = during altar calls? This phenomenon is never found in Episcopal churches, hence our congregants' reputation (lacking such encouragement) for preferring = the back pews.   That is not just in Protestant churches, but is found increasingly in new churches, especially Roman Catholic ones, where the altar call is not = really part of their tradition. It's done for visual and acoustical reasons, much as the seating in a theatre, cinema or concert hall is raked, going right back to classical Greek open-air theatre tradition.   >I've read, too, that to be really correct the "aisle" should be called = the pace. An aisle is one of the outer, more low-ceilinged, vessels = alongside the main nave in a large gothic, romanesque etc. building.   This is technically perhaps true, but has not been so in practice for some considerable time. The "centre aisle", usually so-called here, is = frequently of old called the alley, but it sounds to me as if that is in fact the = same word in English, instead of French, dress. I'm guessing that both words = come from Latin "ala" for "wing" (I'm tying to draw on my Latin of 45 years ago and more).   "Up" is of course of old custom anyway: you go "up to town", "up to = London", "up to Cambridge" etc., or even "uptown". In the same way you can be "sent down" if expelled from university. "Up", therefore, is the direction of = what is important rather than a question of altitude.   In good English fashion, therefore, if I were to say I was going into town to the town centre, I could say, "I'm going downtown, uptown" and be = clearly understood. :-)   Ross   --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.712 / Virus Database: 468 - Release Date: 27/06/2004    
(back) Subject: RE: Clergy Funerals / Burial From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 13:11:05 -0500   As I recall, a properly consecrated altar, at least to the Roman Catholics, has the relics of at least 2 martyrs in it. Before Vatican II Mass wasn't even supposed to be said unless there was an altar stone with the relics.   Alicia   > > It derives from early times, when congregations met in the Roman > catacombs and used sarcophogi as altars. To this day, many Catholic > altars (or all of them?) should contain a relic of a saint underneath a > slab of stone in the middle, where the paten and chalice are placed > during mass. There's probably more to it than that, and I too would > be interested in further details.      
(back) Subject: Re: up, down, all around From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 14:37:12 -0400   On 6/28/04 9:40 AM, "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> wrote:   > I've read, too, that to be really correct the "aisle" should be called = the > pace. An aisle is one of the outer, more low-ceilinged, vessels = alongside > the main nave in a large gothic, romanesque etc. building.   Paul: Interesting. New one on me. What I read years ago is that that thing we usually call the "center aisle" is properly called "the alley."   I didn't figure I could sell the concept, so didn't try.   Alan    
(back) Subject: consecrating an altar From: "Raymond H. Clark, Quilisma Publications" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 11:47:32 -0700   We did one of TWO solemn consecrations of altars in SoCal when new St. Matthew's was blessed.   The CHURCH received a SIMPLE blessing, rather than a solemn consecration, as it will eventually be the parish hall, but the ALTAR was solemnly consecrated according to the 1962 Roman Pontifical, which I translated for the Anglicans.   No relics were deposited (most Anglicans don't believe in that), but everything else was done.   Fortunately Our Lady of Angels Cathedral in LA consecrated THEIR altar shortly before WE did, so I was able to watch on TV and review the ceremonies, since I'd only SEEN it once before in my life.   Most modern RC churches have a small altar-stone set into the altar table, which has been previously consecrated by a bishop, including sealing the relics in the stone.   For a solemn consecration, the altar has five Greek crosses incised into the four corners and the middle.   The bishop takes off his vestments, except for stole and alb, and puts on an apron (gremiale).   While the Veni Creator and various antiphons are sung, he pours blessed wine, holy water mixed with ashes from Ash Wednesday, and holy oil into the five crosses.   Next he puts five grains of incense in each cross (for the Five Wounds of Christ) and pours hot wax from the Paschal Candle over the crosses to seal them.   Then he pours holy oil, wine, and water mixed with ashes in the form of two St. Andrew's Crosses (two Xs), connecting the crosses at the four corners through the center cross.   Then he anoints the entire altar with holy oil, wine, and holy water mixed with ashes.   Finally, a brazier is set in the midst of the altar with hot coals.   The bishop puts aromatic cedar chips (a memorial of the pillars of the First Temple at Jerusalem), a large amount of incense, the remainder of the holy oil, and the portion of the Paschal Candle with the Five Nails into the fire.   While the fire is blazing, Te Deum is sung, and all the church bells are rung.   Meanwhile the entire sanctuary disappears in a thick cloud of smoke (chuckle).   Afterwards, the altar is not washed, but allowed to dry. A waxed or plastic "cere-cloth" is then laid down so that the linens can be laid over the anointed altar without spoiling them.   It's quite a glorious ceremony.   Cheers,   Bud   Alicia Zeilenga wrote:   > As I recall, a properly consecrated altar, at least to the Roman > Catholics, has the relics of at least 2 martyrs in it. Before Vatican = II > Mass wasn't even supposed to be said unless there was an altar stone = with > the relics. > > Alicia > > >>It derives from early times, when congregations met in the Roman >>catacombs and used sarcophogi as altars. To this day, many Catholic >>altars (or all of them?) should contain a relic of a saint underneath a >>slab of stone in the middle, where the paten and chalice are placed >>during mass. There's probably more to it than that, and I too would >>be interested in further details. > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: up, down, all around From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 15:04:52 -0400   On 6/28/04 12:28 PM, "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   > but is found increasingly in new churches, especially Roman Catholic = ones, > where the altar call is not really part of their tradition.   Well, in a sort of a way it is (part of the catholic tradition). Does not the celebrant or deacon sing out, "Holy Things for Holy People! Come, for all things are now ready!"? Now THERE's an "altar call" with INCENTIVE!   Alan    
(back) Subject: POE In Illinois (X-Posted) From: <Devon3000@aol.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 18:14:01 EDT   Hi all,   I believe I'm still recovering from the hectic but wonderful POE of last week, based at Wheaton College. There were 27 students, ranging in age = from 11 to 19. I understand a waiting list of about a dozen had to be turned down, = and no one of those selected backed out!   Each student had a one hour lesson each day, at a different pipe organ = each day. David Lincoln and his committee laid out a system where students = were bussed to churches and back, 43 churches used total in the suburban area. = All went without an error, no one made any trouble, and not one person got = sick! Naomi Rowley remarked that she had never seen a POE that used so many = churches.   On Sunday afternoon, June 30th, they registered and visited the home of = Paul VanderMolen, where Clark Wilson demonstrated the 4-manual theatre organ = there. In the evening, they attented a concert by Dr. Edward Zimmerman, who = played the mighty Casavant at the college in his usual excellent and exciting = manner, closing the concert with an arrangement of the Guilmant first sonata final =   movement for two organs by himself. His now Senior student Joel Bevington =   played the second part brilliantly, and we'll look for more great things = from his career ahead.   Dr. Zimmerman did an introduction to the organ, organ design, and organ registration workshop on Monday morning, followed by Lorraine Brugh, who = did a splendid job talking about how to practice. After lessons and practice, = they attended evensong at Trinity Episcopal Church in Wheaton, and in the = evening Todd Wilson accompanied the Phantom of the Opera on the Casavant. A technical = and musical workout, it was too campy and not as serious as I like to see and = hear for such a masterpiece of a movie, but all, including me, enjoyed it.   Tuesday morning, Todd Wilson gave a great workshop on service playing, and =   when I asked several if they learned anything, they responded very = positively. Todd is great with young people. After Todd, Richard Webster did another fantastic workshop on basic improvisation, using many students. They = found out they could do more than they imagined, and I'm sure they're trying new = things already.   After lessons and practice, the Berghaus Organ Company hosted a wonderful dinner, and had a couple of portable organs for the kids to play on, which = they all did very well. After supper, they all were bussed to St. Raphael's in =   Naperville, where Douglas Cleveland held them spellbound with a very = exciting and well played program.   Wednesday, after lessons and practice in the morning, they all were bussed =   downtown to Chicago, where about 10 each played at several large churches = and Orchestra Hall. David Schrader wowed us all with his demonstration of the =   mighty Casavant at Orchestra Hall. They also visited St. James Cathedral, = Holy Name Cathedral and Fourth Presbyterian, after which they spent the rest of = the afternoon and evening at Navy Pier.   On Thursday, after the morning lessons and practice, Margaret Kemper and Naomi Rowley did master classes for beginners and advanced students = respectively. All went to the Arcada theatre where David Rhodes demonstrated the theatre =   organ, and then they all went to St. Petronille's in Glen Ellyn for a = pizza supper and a great concert by Charles Sega, a former POE student, now = director of music in an Episcopal church in Glenview, Illinois.   By now, we all were beginning to droop, but we still had lessons Friday morning and the student recital in early afternoon, where they all did so = very well and many parents attended.   I was originally only on standby as a teacher, but at the last minute, Marilyn Keiser injured her shoulder, and I was called to take her two = students (Margaret Kemper subbed for the workshop Marilyn would have done).   After the student recital, Dr. Zimmerman hosted the faculty and all who helped in other ways at his home in Bristol, Illinois. He has what I have = always considered my dream house, a former church, complete with stain glass = windows. He has done a beautiful job making it into a very unique home, with three pipe organs and a grand piano!! It was a very quiet party though, as = those who attended were really tired, but only one didn't want to do it again next = year.   One thing that really impressed me was the piano background of all participants, as well as their knowledge of theory. When we had some free = time at St. Petronille's, the music director invited the students to play any of the = four pianos around the church. You could walk almost anywhere and here = glorious piano music!   It was nice to see two of Jean-Paul Buzard's children, and son Stephen, = age 15, played the Schubler Chorale, "Wo Soll ich fliehen hin", brilliantly, = and his sister Katie, age 12, did the best performance of Bach's little = Prelude in G Minor. Stephen says he is learning all the Schubler chorales this summer, =   has three done already! Watch out for that guy. He'll be building and dedicating both, I'm sure.   One dangerous aspect of this POE was the cafeteria at Wheaton College. = The food was so good, I gained 10 pounds!! Got rid of 5 of that already by exercize and less eating, but it was so fantastic. Dr. Zimmerman said = that four years ago, it was rated number 1 in college cafeterias. It is now number = 4, but I can't imagine how the other three can be any better. So many choices, and = I wasn't the only one eating more than necessary! Next year, I'll be more careful (I hope). I won't tell you all the choices we had, and all in = buffet style!!   It took so much work and planning, but it was so worth it to hear the beginning and advanced students at that recital at the end. It made all = us teachers and assistants confident that the organ is in good hands for the future, = as long as we continue to offer events like this.   Devon Hollingsworth, in DeKalb, Illinois  
(back) Subject: RE: POE In Illinois (X-Posted) From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 17:28:25 -0500   What a great account, Devon!     Glenda Sutton   gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Devon3000@aol.com Sent: Monday, June 28, 2004 5:14 PM To: piporg-l@listserv.ablany.edu; pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: POE In Illinois (X-Posted)     Hi all,   I believe I'm still recovering from the hectic but wonderful POE of last week, based at Wheaton College. There were 27 students, ranging in age from 11 to 19. I understand a waiting list of about a dozen had to be turned down, and no one of those selected backed out!          
(back) Subject: Re: POE In Illinois (X-Posted) From: "Scott" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 17:41:25 -0500   I went to the POE concert on Friday. I must say that the art in this = area is not dying so much, there were many young performers with lots of = potential. Being a young organist (only 26) it is good to see that the = next young generation is still fascinated by the pipe organ.
(back) Subject: Re: up, down, all around From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 19:52:35 EDT   I have never heard the center aisle called "the alley." In the Baptist church, for many years they designed the churches without a center aisle = as a protest of the Liturgical churches having a center aisle leading to the = alter. The church where I play now does not have a center aisle, having 3 sections of =   pews. The pulpit from where the pastor does his sermon is in the center = of the podium. They seem to like preaching to a pew full of people rather than a =   center aisle. I do not know any theology about this, just what I was told = as a child. Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: up, down, all around From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 20:05:13 -0400   On 6/28/04 7:52 PM, "OMusic@aol.com" <OMusic@aol.com> wrote:   > They seem to like preaching to a pew full of people rather than a center > aisle. I do not know any theology about this, just what I was told as a > child. =20   I=B9ve never heard of it having that theological implication, but it=B9s quite believable. =20   One of my first parishes was that way. Three sections of seating. (Of course, our pulpit was always off to one side.) What WAS weird about ours was that it was =B3women and kids in center,=B2 =B3men in the section off to my left.=B2 And to the right? A concession. That was for engaged couples. (There were a FEW of them, but not many.)   Funny thing, history!   Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: Anglican funeral rites From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 22:55:55 EDT   In a message dated 6/28/2004 9:45:40 AM Eastern Standard Time, PEMMONS@wcupa.edu writes: This is also the custom in Anglo-Catholic churches, although we don't = believe in the rapture. I thought one of the foundational beliefs for Christians was that Jesus = was coming to take the church to be with Him, which is refered to as the = rapture (from the Greek work meaning "caught up") Do Anglo-Catholics not believe this?   Steve Skinner  
(back) Subject: ATOS Convention (x-posted) From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jun 2004 00:14:54 -0400   To the lists:   How many folks on the list are going to the ATOS Convention in Milwaukee? It looks like it's going to be a good one. I'll be there - shamelessly self-promoting again! LOL   Tom Hoehn, Organist Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes, Ellenton, FL (substitute - 4/42 Wurlitzer) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL (4/9?- = Rodgers/Ruffati/Wicks) Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS/VotS-ATOS/DTOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOUploads/    
(back) Subject: Re: up, down, all around From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Tue, 29 Jun 2004 07:43:39 +0100   I have always referred to the aisle as 'the aisle', and to the outer = aisles as 'the side aisles' - and have never come across the use of 'pace' or 'alley' in this context either verbally or in church literature ... but then, who am I to be an authority (with only fifty years experience) ?   [Slightly off-topic] This does remind me of the vast range of words which have different definitions in differing places (and times). An 'Alley' (that is, a path or drive-way) is sometimes called a = 'fordrough' in the West Midlands (from Through-fare) and also known as the delightful 'Twitten' in East Sussex (from 'be-twixt and be-tween').   [Back On-topic] When is an aisle not an aisle ? Probably in 'our' church = - where the chancel and the (main) aisle are not in a straight line - the = body of the church 'kinking' off to the left - which can be quite disconcerting for the processing choir, seeing as all the other 'lines' of architecture are straight.   Harry Grove [a.k.a. musicman]     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, June 28, 2004 7:37 PM Subject: Re: up, down, all around     > On 6/28/04 9:40 AM, "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> wrote: > > > I've read, too, that to be really correct the "aisle" should be called the > > pace. An aisle is one of the outer, more low-ceilinged, vessels alongside > > the main nave in a large gothic, romanesque etc. building. > > Paul: Interesting. New one on me. What I read years ago is that that > thing we usually call the "center aisle" is properly called "the alley." > > I didn't figure I could sell the concept, so didn't try. > > Alan      
(back) Subject: ATOS Convention From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jun 2004 03:36:20 -0400   To the lists:   How many folks on the list are going to the ATOS Convention in Milwaukee? It looks like it's going to be a good one. I'll be there - shamelessly self-promoting again! LOL   Tom Hoehn, Organist Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes, Ellenton, FL (substitute - 4/42 Wurlitzer) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL (4/9?- = Rodgers/Ruffati/Wicks) Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS/VotS-ATOS/DTOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOUploads/