PipeChat Digest #4328 - Tuesday, March 2, 2004
 
Re: Allen Organ Model 314
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Re: Allen Organ Model 314
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: NU etc.
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Allen Organ Model 314
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Titles, & Belonging
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Allen Organ Model 314
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Little Switches on the Allen
  by "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com>
Re: Ancient Masters & Meantone organs, was North Texas State?
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Replying to a posting without repeating all of it
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Anglican organs
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Questions
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: NU etc.
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Showing my ignorance
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: An engineering question- thanks!
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: Allen Organ Model 314
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Allen Organ Model 314 From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 11:53:08 -0500   I think that you are looking at the switches that control the celeste = voicing. Or it also could control the small lights that are used to = switch on certain stops. Check the bottom of the switch and follow its = origin on the board. You can also check those bulbs on the board. = Sometimes they burn out and I believe they are GE #97 bulbs the size of = a ten penny nail head.The whole stop will be then non functioning. On my = Custom IV, the switches were used to turn off the celeste to allow = tuning and circuit checking.=20 Paul ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Keys4bach@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Tuesday, March 02, 2004 8:34 AM Subject: Re: Allen Organ Model 314     In a message dated 3/2/2004 8:23:37 AM Eastern Standard Time, = mrstwin2@cox.net writes:     Also what I am trying to figure out totally is the switches on the = boards that pull out from under the console. They list each stop and = there is 5 small switches for that stop. I assume that each switch is = for each octave, though I could be wrong.         combination action?  
(back) Subject: Re: Re: Allen Organ Model 314 From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 12:01:39 -0500   Dear Milo, If it is set up like my old Custom IV, each division Diapason, Reeds, flutes etc has its own amp. Also each manual has a control to adjust its keying voltage. Adjusting the keying voltage in the console will take care of your volume problem. Follow the line from the buss bar on the back of = the manual to the adjustable resistor (wire wound). Adjust accordingly. As regarding your 2' Block flute scratchiness, you probably will have to have an Allen tech look at it. From what I remember ther is no oferall adjustment on the amp for treble to bass adjustment. There are tone = changers on the edge of the generator boards that might have a problem but I cannot advise you on that since I don;t have the print in front of me. The guy = who can answer that one is Desert Bob Scarborough. Mohamet has to go up to his mountain though. LOL.   Paul             ----- Original Message ----- From: "Milo R.Shepherd" <mrstwin2@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, March 02, 2004 8:20 AM Subject: Re: Re: Allen Organ Model 314     > Paul, Bud, > > I know that working on it might be a mission of futility, but I also = look at it as a opprotunity to learn about an older instrument. > > Two things I have noticed is that 1. The 2' Blockflute on the great has = a ting to it. I can tell its slightly out of whack from the rest of the = organ and gives the tone a very interesting fingernails down the chalkboard feeling. > The second is that the choir keyboard is about 1/2 the volume of the = swell keyboard. A simple setting on the pedals will overwhelm the choir. > > Also what I am trying to figure out totally is the switches on the = boards that pull out from under the console. They list each stop and there is 5 small switches for that stop. I assume that each switch is for each = octave, though I could be wrong. > > Thanks for your input. Until the church authorizes a new organ, we are going to be using this organ. > > Milo > > > > From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> > > Date: 2004/03/02 Tue AM 12:36:58 EST > > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > Subject: Re: Allen Organ Model 314 > > > > Dear Bud, > > Well the organ I had Bud, a Custom IV had a zillion capacitors = and > > transistors but very few had to be replaced and that organ was built = in > > 1970. The Custom Carousel had fewer of them but none had to be = replaced > > during my ownership. Again that organ was built in 1970, I bought it = in 1983 > > and according to the Allen Tech, had never been tuned either nor = needed it. > > I had them do stretch tuning which did make it sound better. > > Paul > > > > ----- Original Message ----- > > From: <quilisma@cox.net> > > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > Sent: Monday, March 01, 2004 9:42 PM > > Subject: Re: Allen Organ Model 314 > > > > > > > From some experiences here locally, it may be a lost cause ... there > > > are about a zillion solder points and capacitors that can go bad., = not > > > just tubes and easily replaceable things. Of course it can be DONE, and > > > Allen still SUPPORTS them; the question is whether it's worth the time, > > > effort and money. > > > > > > Cheers, > > > > > > Bud > > > > > > Paul Valtos wrote: > > > > > > > Dear Milo, > > > > If you tell me what it is doing (or not doing) I might be = able to > > help > > > > you having had two analog Allens a Custom Carousel and a Custom IV > > church > > > > organ. I maintained both. The Custom IV was identical to the 314 except > > you > > > > have three manuals and your tone generators are within the = console. > > > > Paul > > > > ----- Original Message ----- > > > > From: "Milo R.Shepherd" <mrstwin2@cox.net> > > > > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > > > Sent: Monday, March 01, 2004 7:01 PM > > > > Subject: Re: Re: Allen Organ Model 314 > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >>well it hasn't been well taken care of over the years and having just > > > > > > > > moved in, want to do what I can to keep it going and if possible improve > > the > > > > sound some. I have a feeling that some of the tubes are burned = out and > > need > > > > to be replaced and having any info would be good. Thanks for the info > > Paul. > > > > > > > >>Milo > > > >> > > > >>>From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> > > > >>>Date: 2004/03/01 Mon PM 05:42:08 EST > > > >>>To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > > >>>Subject: Re: Allen Organ Model 314 > > > >>> > > > >>>dear Milo, > > > >>> I'm sure that you can buy the entire analog service manual from > > > > > > > > Allen > > > > > > > >>>organ for around $50. bucks. It was around that price about ten years > > > > > > > > ago. > > > > > > > >>>It covers all analog organs made by Allen including the tube = type. > > > > > > > > What's > > > > > > > >>>wrong with yours. > > > >>> Paul > > > >>>----- Original Message ----- > > > >>>From: "Milo R.Shepherd" <mrstwin2@cox.net> > > > >>>To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > > >>>Sent: Monday, March 01, 2004 2:40 PM > > > >>>Subject: Allen Organ Model 314 > > > >>> > > > >>> > > > >>> > > > >>>>I am trying to locate manuals for the Allen Organ Model 314. Is there > > > >>> > > > >>>anyone out there that might have owner or technical manuals for = it? > > > >>> > > > >>>>Thanks > > > >>>> > > > >>>>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > >>>>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > > >>>>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > >>>>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > >>>>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > >>>>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >>>> > > > >>>> > > > >>> > > > >>>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > >>>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > > >>>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > >>>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > >>>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > >>>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >>> > > > >>> > > > >>> > > > >> > > > >>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > >>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > > >>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > >>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > >>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > >>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >> > > > >> > > > > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related = topics > > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: NU etc. From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 12:16:17 -0500   At 10:41 AM 2004-03-02 -0600, you wrote: >Morton Belcher wrote: "Pardon me, but I have missed something. Who is = "the >Rubsam?" > >Wolfgang Rubsam. Renowned organist and recording artist. Former = Professor >at Northwestern. Naxos.com has many of his CD's, and quite a good bio on >him. A Google search will direct you to much info about him and his >recordings. I have several of his older recordings ...LOVE THEM. = Brilliant >and elegant performances of Bach, Buxtehude, and other baroque masters. >However, his "style" has evolved in recent years into to what can best be >described as "Ton Koopman IMITATING Ton Koopman". Outrageous >interpretation, nonsensical over done ornamentation, non musical >registration, disrythmic tripe! Very sad indeed. Perhaps it is to >everyone's benefit that he has taken up hair cutting with scissors in = place >of hairs plitting in organ performances. > >Tim   Tim,   I agree with you for the most part. I have some of his Phillips Bach recordings, and some of his Naxos recordings. His Phillips recordings are =   sane, beautifully measured performances. Then something must of happened in the 80s, for when he did the Naxos cycle, he does some of the most bizarre, profoundly annoying playing I have ever heard. Some of it is excellent though. His organ concertos one done on a big Flentrop in Seattle is good, his trio sonatas are doen quite nicely, but it is the preludes and fugues stuff that I find unlistenable. It seems that every trill, ornament, turn of phrase, is a big event.   I wouldn't call his style "Ton Koopman IMITATING T. Koopman" though. Koopman has a style all his own, certainly provocative at times, beautiful at other times.   For me, I find Peter Hurford, or Ewald Kooiman more listenable in many = cases.   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263      
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Organ Model 314 From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 09:25:55 -0800   Nope. The switches are how you set the pistons (grin). Turn on "5" on the Great Open Diapason, that sets it on General 5, or Great 5. It should say SOMEWHERE on the board. I presume (I don't remember) that you have 5 Generals, 5 divisionals for each division, and 5 Pedal pistons? Or you might just have 5 "Master" pistons that fire Swell-Great-Choir-Pedal "1", etc.   Have fun (grin) ... I HATE setterboard combination actions.   Cheers,   Bud              
(back) Subject: Re: Titles, & Belonging From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 12:19:15 EST   In a message dated 3/2/2004 11:51:14 AM Eastern Standard Time, crlester@137.com writes:   > "Minister of Music" is that the > bearer has a degree in theology. That's how it was explained > to me anyway, once upon a time. So whenever people refer to > me thusly, I correct them since I have no such degree. > >   true but we remain in a ministerial role as shepherd of the choir---and leadership in worship.   today it is usually director of music ministries--thus resulting in less = pay for the same job.....   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Organ Model 314 From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 12:20:26 EST   In a message dated 3/2/2004 12:18:01 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@cox.net writes:   > Have fun (grin) ... I HATE setterboard combination actions. >   at least it is near the console and not in some anteroom or on a distant = wall like certain presby churches in cinit.   dale in florida    
(back) Subject: Little Switches on the Allen From: "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 09:21:19 -0800   It doesn't appear that anyone has answered this yet, so --   The little button panels are called "setterboards."   You will see that you have five generals; then five great, five swell, five choir, and five pedal pistons - plus some reversibles and a general cancel.   The five little switches correspond to the five pistons. There is a switch for every stop and coupler. If the switch is in the ON position, that stop will engage when the corresponding piston is pressed. E.G., Swell 2' Blockflote Switch #3 ON means when you press piston 3, the Blockflote will pop our, or flip down, as the case may be.   And so on. The 5 generals are not independent generals but are "collective" -- e.g., General 3 brings on whatever stops you've set for Great 3 Choir 3 Swell 3 Pedal 3.   Hardly the best system in the world, yet Allen used this system for all their early analog instruments. In the early 1970s they switched to a new "computer capture" system that had true flexibility - but had its own very vexing drawback: The computers in those dinosaur-days were slow and limited. On large Allen consoles, you would press a general piston, then could go out for coffee and come back while the combination changed -- the stops popped out in groups -- blip-blip-blip-blip-blip-blip-blip-blip- like that. The bigger the organ, the more blips. The biggest Allen from that era that I played, a four-decker, had -12- blips for the generals!   I played on a large, mid-1960s analog Allen with the setterboard system. Imagine an organ with about 90 stops, 5 pistons and 5 collective generals. I spent many a furtive non-musical moment turning the setterboard switches on and off during the services.   I also played on a later analog instrument with the new computer capture system. I learned how to plan ahead for stop changes --- practicing fast pieces included figuring out the timing for just when to press the piston in order to get the desired stop change at the right time.   Wurlitzer pipe organs and some other early theatre- and concert-organs also used setterboard systems. With those that have generals, the generals are also collective --- so don't disparage Allen for this flaw! In the Wurlys, the setterboard panels are in the back of the console - you have to take the back off the console to get to them. And, if I am not mistaken, in the really huge examples, the setterboards are somewhere afar off in a remote cabinet. Thus, frequent piston re-sets are not do-able. While I am not a theatre organist, my understanding is that there's a more or less "set" plan for pistons that may vary a bit from organ to organ and organist to organist, but I believe there is some degree of standardization.   The early analog Allens had some clever - if silly - stops that were really just volume & filter controls to get more variety from one stop. You'd often see such things as "Diapasons Become Dulcianas" or "Stopped Flutes Become Open" or "Trumpet Becomes Oboe" or "Mourning Becomes Electra" ... er! ... then there was the infamous 'C' stop, which added a clicky sound to the flutes that rather lamely imitated the sound of CHIFF. It sounded more percussive than chiffy, especially when turned up too high. "Flutes Become Xylophones."   Also, all the analog Allens - even the huge custom rigs, were unit organs. You had a given set of "ranks" of tone generators from which all the stops were derived.   On the most modest-sized Allen, there was ONE set of flute tone generators, and all the stops were synthesized from these. Basically a Hammond without the advantage of level-adjustable drawbars.   The next level up had two generators, flute and diapason. The reeds were synthesized from the flute generators and the strings from the diapasons.   Then the next level would include a separate string rank for celeste.   Then, you'd have a real reed from which all the reeds were derived. The Swell "Hautbois" was the same as the "Trompette" just not as loud; and the Pedal reeds were louder yet but still the same timbre. (I will say that in these early analog Allens, the chorus reeds were the best- and most-convincing sounding of all the stops. The Pedal reeds usually sounded particularly good.)   Expression shoes, when there was more than one, were frustratingly divided "Reeds" and "Flues" and not by manuals! Very frustrating and contrary to proper church organ design. And it got complicated since not all the reeds came FROM the reed generators, e.g., Clarinets were derived from the flute; and some flutes, e.g. "Quintaton" came from the reed generator!!   Then, you'd have one set of four or five generators for Great, Swell and Pedal, and a separate set for the Choir; with expression shoes divided "Great/Swell/Pedal" and Choir;   Then one set for "Great and Choir" and one for "Swell and Pedal" with expresssion shoes divided accordingly.   It was not until you got up into the really large custom 3- and 4-manual instruments that you had separate geneator sets for each manual and pedal, and "sensible" expression. But even these instruments were fully unified. Even on the very largest ones they built there was an awful lot of duplication. On a given manual, ALL the diapasons including mixtures came from a common set of unified tone generators, same for flutes, strings and reeds. They still used a variety of filters to get more silk from sows' ears -- and it was helpful for the organist to understand this and register accordingly.   ~ C      
(back) Subject: Re: Ancient Masters & Meantone organs, was North Texas State? From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 12:21:32 EST   In a message dated 3/2/2004 11:48:59 AM Eastern Standard Time, agun@telcel.net.ve writes:   > you hardly want to hear it played in modern > equal temperament again. I   Which is why toasters include several temps with the organ.......   dale in florida    
(back) Subject: Replying to a posting without repeating all of it From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 12:22:51 -0500   Dear List,   When it comes to computer matters, and possibly a number of others, I am surely the person for whom all the Dummies books were written. However, I have learned this much. After reading a posting to which I think I must respond, I click on "Reply," which seems self-evident. This will give me a letter form, in the case of Pipechat, addressed to Pipechat, in the case = of PipOrg-L, addressed to the sending individual. (We've all been caught offguard by that difference occasionally.) On the letter form, you will = see the entire posting to which you are responding. Simply select out all = those bits which do not concern your response, and delete them, along with the taglines at the end for Pipechat or PipOrg-L. Up on top, or at the bottom = if you prefer, write your response. If I can manage that, everyone can!   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler (The Original Computer Dummy) www.mander-organs.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Anglican organs From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 09:32:39 -0800   Um, check your dates, Colin. The English Reformation began in about 1528 or so with the insertion of the English "Order for Holy Communion" in the Mass; the first Prayer Book was imposed by law on Whitsunday of 1549; Byrd and Tallis were still alive; Byrd continued to write for the illegal Latin Mass as well as the new services. When asked about that, Queen Elizabeth remarked, "but he is ONLY a musician." (chuckle).   Virtually all the 20th-century composers you list require the organ sound I was describing.   Despite the fact that Purcell WAS a genius, not a whole lot of his music passed into the working repertoire, even of most cathedrals and collegiate churches ... a Te Deum comes to mind, "Thou Knowest, Lord", and a set or two of Mags and Nunc ... I'm sure I'm omitting some things, but not a lot, I think.   Bud   Colin Mitchell wrote:   > Hello, > > I have to dispute Bud's assumptions about Anglican > Church Music. > > The BULK of Anglican Music comes from the > pre-reformation period, the SEVENTEENTH century > (Purcell etc) when the attempt was made to import > French ideas during the Restoration, the 19th century > naturally, BUT > a vast amount has been written and continues to be > written since then. > > A few recent names to conjour with:- > > Kenneth Leighton (Significant) > > Philip Moore (Quite a lot) > > Francis Jackson (Fair output) > > John Rutter (Huge output) > > Herbert Sumsion (Quite prolific) > > Herbie Howells (Wrote a number of settings which all > sound the same) > > Though not strictly "Anglican" and written for > private performances, the Handel Chandos Anthems are > reasonably significant, and of course, there is that > little performed work called "Messiah". > > Oh yes! Musn't forget Gerald Finzi and Elgar and > Vaughan Williams and Benji Britten and....who cares? > > Come up to date Bud!! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > > --- quilisma@cox.net wrote: > >>I have asked this question MANY times: >> >>WHAT are these organists THINKING? >> > > >>The BULK of the Anglican CHORAL repertoire is from >>the 16th, 19th, and >>early 20th centuries > > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster > http://search.yahoo.com > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Questions From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 09:36:44 -0800   Alternatim:   Organ - Kyrie eleison Choir - Kyrie eleison Organ - Kyrie eleison   Choir - Christe eleison Organ - Christe eleison Choir - Christe eleison   Organ - Kyrie eleison Choir - Kyrie eleison Organ - Kyrie eleison   a la Couperin, etc.   Alternatim was forbidden by a decree of the Sacred Congregation of Rites. I don't remember off-hand whether Pius the X mentioned it in the Motu Proprio on church music ... as I recall the decree was BEFORE that, which would put it in the 19th century, or earlier.   There were already decrees in Spain that required the text to be spoken (shouted?) audibly OVER the organ's verses, which must have been interesting when the trumpets were in use.   I am speaking here, of course, of the liturgical use of alternatim in the Roman Catholic Church. Others may do as they like (grin).   CHeers,   Bud   David Baker wrote:   > > Bud: What do you mean by "alternatim", and who says it is forbidden? > > Also, the organ in the chancel at All Saints, Ashmont, was renovated > (ahem!) by William Laws and hardly has any of the original builder > left, at least tonally. I think it was originally a Casavant, not an > Austin, but I could be wrong about that. > > David Baker > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: NU etc. From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 12:28:55 EST   In a message dated 3/2/2004 11:15:45 AM Central Standard Time, ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com writes: For me, I find Peter Hurford, or Ewald Kooiman more listenable in many = cases.   Arie V. Hurford is a great technician, but he sure does love to abuse the reeds on =   that Rieger...the "Spanische Trompette", the 32's and other chorus = reeds-the playing is very legato too-it sounds like he's playing Mendelssohn half = the time. I have several complete Bach recordings and find Hans Fagius to be the = most enjoyable-check them out! By the way-I just heard a CD of Wolf Rubsam = playing the Reubke, the Reger Wachet Auf, and a few other virtuosic works-simply stunning-he plays the DEVIL out of the Reger and Reubke-and its live in = concert. However controversial he is, he has the chops and the mind to play however = he wishes. He is a professor of organ in Germany, and when he is not there, =   lives in Valparaiso, Indiana-on a farm which he owns-simply because his = wife loves horses-the barber shop is for fun-not a living-come on folks. cheers, gfc           Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Showing my ignorance From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 09:39:04 -0800   Nope. They can't be, because, unlike the Lutherans, Anglicans use many, MANY tunes. Also, we sing the Psalms at Evensong ... a fully-noted Psalter would take up several large volumes.   Cheers,   Bud   Dr. Amy Fleming wrote:   > Thanks Bud and Scott. I have seen those marks in my own (Lutheran) = church > but didn't know what they were called. Why is it difficult for = organists? > Isn't the music written in the organists book? Amy > >        
(back) Subject: RE: An engineering question- thanks! From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 13:29:02 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Dear friends,   Thanks a lot for all these kind answers both private and on List.   To this time I made wood structures "by feeling", or using measurements of existing ones as almost all our artisans here do but it's my wish to = acquire background knowledge although I often have seen materials behaving in very different manner "as the book says"- there are so many variable facts in Nature! :)   Hoadley's "Understanding wood" is a textbook of the AIO syllabus. I will = try to get it next time I come to the States. Meanwhile, I got a very useful website with all the information I need for now from several List people. Thanks again!   Yours Andres   Off topic note: Right now we are in big trouble. Since last friday there = are countrywide riots and street battles in Venezuela. This affects the local Internet. I cannot download or submit mail succesfully in these days. To the list owners: If you have trouble with my adress please take the necessary steps at once. I will be back as soon things normalize. No thread on this subject, please. Apologies, Andres    
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Organ Model 314 From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 09:44:55 -0800   Yeah ... isn't that the Holtkamp at John Knox Pres? Walter Sr. would build setterboards so he could add one more rank of pipes (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Keys4bach@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 3/2/2004 12:18:01 PM Eastern Standard Time, > quilisma@cox.net writes: > >> Have fun (grin) ... I HATE setterboard combination actions. > > > > at least it is near the console and not in some anteroom or on a distant =   > wall like certain presby churches in cinit. > > dale in florida