PipeChat Digest #4330 - Tuesday, March 2, 2004
 
Re: should the organist be a member of the denomination?
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: ALL READ: Re: NU etc.
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Hymn Preludes & Postludes for Episcopalian hymns
  by "Gerald Montagna" <geraldrm@earthlink.net>
Re: Video Projectors, Hymnals, etc.
  by "George Greene" <maltose_falcon@yahoo.com>
Rubsam and Paukert
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Video Projectors, Hymnals, etc.
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Estey stock models
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
BWV 534
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: NU etc. Who is "the Rubsam?"
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Hymn Preludes & Postludes for Episcopalian hymns
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Hymn Preludes & Postludes for Episcopalian hymns
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Anglican organs
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: Video Projectors, Hymnals, etc.
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
RE: Anglican organs
  by "Shaun Brown" <S.D.Brown@exeter.ac.uk>
RE: Anglican organs
  by "Shaun Brown" <S.D.Brown@exeter.ac.uk>
The Highway Code part 1
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Hymn Preludes & Postludes for Episcopalian hymns
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: should the organist be a member of the denomination?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Beau Surratt
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: should the organist be a member of the denomination? From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 13:57:15 -0600   Maybe the key is the difference between the denominations who think similarly to the Methodist (and yes, when I say Methodist I mean United - those of us who have been around since before 65 tend to still just say Methodist). As someone mentioned before - there is the old saying that you can "believe anything and be a Methodist" - which I admit is somewhat true. But probably more importantly - You can be part of any other denomination and most Methodist and folk in like-minded denominations will consider your beliefs equally valid to their own. Ergo - I can lead the music and contribute to a worship service in which my fellow worshippers do not believe exactly as I do - in fact, if we are honest, this is what we do every Sunday regardless of denomination. Unless you have a church of mindless clones - I would hazard to say that no two people in any pew have totally matching beliefs. Does this mean they can't worship together? or can't be inspired by the same music? or edified by the same preaching? I think not. The last time I checked, we were all praising the same God. To state one cannot worship or serve God equally in all churches is to say that some church's worship is less valid than others.   Furthermore - I think the assumption that anyone who works outside the narrow confines of their prefered "brand name" denomination is "self-gratifying", "self-glorifying", or "unemployable" is unjust, unjustified, offensive, and bigoted.   Off my soapbox - you may return to your petty, sectarian squabbling now.   Margo Dillard Organist, FUMC Lewisville, Texas Born and raised a Methodist - but also served (yes SERVED, not just worked) in regular or substitute capacity in churches of 7 other denominations   > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> >   > >>is just there because it is a job, for extra pocket money, for self >>gratification, for self glorification, they are in the wrong place in a >>church. The church should not be a haven for the otherwise unemployable >>church musician, no matter how good or professional he or she may be. > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: ALL READ: Re: NU etc. From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 11:56:49 -0800 (PST)   This is true. And yes, I lack knowledge about what's wrong or right at NU. But I would like to ask anyone here: Who knows exactly what is going on at = NU? Tell us, because we all want to know. It's not money or support is it? = Ok, the instruments may not be all that good. (Remember someone = bad-mouthed those "german reeds" and called the console a "pig") Have = they considered doing a national search for a person to head things off = and get things back in track? What was discovered in the review of the = program? Its not lack of students. Someone even mentioned getting on Oprah = to announce a scholarship for an organ student at NU. Whats up with that? = Inform us as to whats going on! If it is knowledge that we lack, do tell us what may be helpful in being = filled with that knowledge. I ask because I care about organ programs all = around the country. And there needs to be opportunities in major cities = like Chicago. Right now, if Chicago Musical decides to cut their program, = guess what folks?!? There will be FEW ORGAN PROGRAMS IN CHICAGOLAND. No = DePaul, no Chicago Musical College, no Univ of IL Chicago, no U of Chicago = no nothing. Just Concordia in River Forest. And no, some organists will = not go to church owned schools. The opportunity to study within city = limits such as Chicago offers more opps for jobs, subbing in big churches. = etc.     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60649 http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster.  
(back) Subject: Hymn Preludes & Postludes for Episcopalian hymns From: "Gerald Montagna" <geraldrm@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 14:58:51 -0500 (GMT-05:00)   I'm wondering what organists do for hymn preludes & postludes for tunes = that are used by Episcopal 1982 and which (1) aren't based on Lutheran = tunes and (2) aren't for major feasts. I find that it's very difficult to = obtain quality works on these neglected tunes, generally I'm lucky if I = have one or two per tune in my collection and with so little competition = the quality is often unsatisfactory. In some cases I don't have any works = at all even for hymns that are frequently used. It just seems that = nearly everything being published comes from organists active in Lutheran = or Methodist churches. Do Episcopalian organists just improvise preludes = and postludes on these tunes (i.e., the tunes which are little-used = outside Hymnal 1982), or don't they bother trying to work them into the = service, or is there some trove of Anglican-focused hymn preludes and = postludes that I've never stumbled upon?  
(back) Subject: Re: Video Projectors, Hymnals, etc. From: "George Greene" <maltose_falcon@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 12:11:14 -0800 (PST)   Alan & Company,   Most of the "Praze and Worship" musicians (especially the gee-tar players and drummers) don't read music anyway, so the "Praze and Worship Team Leader" (who might or might not be paper-trained) generally gives the musicians a sheet of paper with the chords listed above the words. The musicians chord along, bang their drums, etc., while the singers howl out the words (usually in unison.) It really drives those of us who ARE paper-trained nuts.   The words are communicated to the congregation on screen. Take away their video projectors and Powerpoint, and there is no way the happy-clappy crowd would be able hold a church service these days.   The Praze Team and the congregation learn the songs through repetition, repetition, repetition, (did I mention repetition?), of which there is PLENTY in the "Praze and Worship" genre of music.   You are SOOOO fortunate in not having to endure all of this! :)   George Greene     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster http://search.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Rubsam and Paukert From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 12:33:01 -0800   My bad! Only on my first pot of coffee this morning (grin). KAREL PAUKERT is at Cleveland.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Video Projectors, Hymnals, etc. From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 14:27:31 -0600   Take away the Projectors - Bring in the PDA's.   David E   David Evangelides Colorado Springs, Colorado   -----Original Message----- From: George Greene <maltose_falcon@yahoo.com>   > Alan & Company, > The words are communicated to the congregation on > screen. Take away their video projectors and > Powerpoint, and there is no way the happy-clappy crowd > would be able hold a church service these days.      
(back) Subject: Re: Estey stock models From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 12:39:09 -0800   I started to say that the Estey catalog had been reprinted, but that was the REED organ catalog ... fascinating ... there's one plate of a HUGE three-manual reed organ with a pipe-fence on three sides ... nobody knows what happened to it.   Does anyone know about the pipe organ catalogue?   Your organ is slightly different from the Model L ... it had:   SWELL   8' Stopped Diapason 8' Salicional 4' Harmonic Flute   GREAT   8' Open Diapason 8' Dulciana 4' Octave   PEDAL   16' Bourdon   As I recall (don't remember from where) the next model up gained you either a Swell Aeoline, or a Swell reedless Oboe; the Great gained a Dulciana or a Melodia or an Octave (depending on which model). I don't think the Pedal ever got any larger ... maybe an 8' Flute.   Cheers,   Bud   littlebayus@yahoo.com wrote:   > --- quilisma@cox.net wrote: > When the old organ (a 7-rank Estey stock > >>Model L, tubular >>pneumatic action) finally wore out, > > > [snip] > > >>Bud >> > > > > Where can one find a compendium of the specifications > of these various Estey stock models? > > BY the way, New Providence Presbyterian Church, > Raphine Va., rebuilt their Estey (built orig. about > 1911 I'm told).... so it will keep going for at least > another ninety years... > > Specs: > > GT: Open Diapason 8'; Melodia 8' Dulciana 8' > SW: Stopped Diapason 8; Salicional 8; Fl. Harmonique > 4' > > Pd: BOurdon 16' > > Tremelo > > GT to Pd > SW to Pd > SW to GT 8' > SW to GT 4' > > DOes a nice job... but the organist cannot use the 8' > Open Diapason for Cong. singing, because it would be > too loud... the organ is right next to the choir, > which is to the right of the altar... > > Morton > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster > http://search.yahoo.com > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: BWV 534 From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 14:37:16 -0600   Somehow Bach's Prelude & Fugue in F Minor (BWV 534) has always been a = piece I like to play during the Lenten season. In the fugue, there is a trill on the 4th note of the subject/answer, and I play this trill in every entry throughout the piece, wherever it may appear. This isn't always easy. For example, in the 15th measure from the end of the piece, I alternate thumbs on the trill.   What I'm wondering about is what the length of this trill should be, and should it have closing notes. Some performers may play a dutiful, perfunctory, 4-note short shake, but I prefer trilling for a least a = quarter note if not for the full duration of the half note.   I should like your opinions on:   1) the length of the trill; 2) the idea of closing notes; 3) the importance of treating each one consistently or allowing some = freedom as the context and fluidity of the surrounding voices may (seem to) = warrant.   Many thanks, Robert Lind    
(back) Subject: Re: NU etc. Who is "the Rubsam?" From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 14:36:31 -0600   At 07:41 AM 3/2/04, you wrote: >Pardon me, but I have missed something. Who is "the >Rubsam?"     Viola! Open up the March 2004 Diapason and there on page 19 is a picture of the Rubsam. 18 & 19 feature an article about Wolfgang Rubsam playing in Oshkosh, Wi on the 21st of March on the Casavant at the First Congregational. The event is the Dupre 80th Anniversary recital where Rubsam will duplicate the program from the Marcel Dupre recital on March 15th 1924. If you can get hold of the latest Diapason your questions will be answered.   jch      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Preludes & Postludes for Episcopalian hymns From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 12:38:05 -0800 (PST)   Hi there Gerald. Hymn arrangements are some of my favorites to play. But like you, = sometimes I feel taht the quality is not per my liking. A lot of people = write music with themselves and their style in minds, and others who try = to play it just don't like it. And with my being an "Anglo-Catholic" makes = me look for tunes that are not commonly in hymn arrangement books that = regularly. Some of the books come and go out of print so quickly that its not even = funny. Im taking it that youa re looking for arrangements of tunes liek = Rockingham Old, St Pat's Breastplate, Sorsum Corda, Wir Pflugen, = Winchester New, Lux Eoi and other tunes that are not common to other = hymnals or that have no othe rarrangements on them. However, = internationally, there seems to be a thing in England as well, where the = more popular hymn tunes are arranged. I find that the Baptists wtrite some = great hymn preludes too. Of course, most other protestants really value = hymn arrangements in church. I wonder if Episcopal churches see hymn = arrangemtns as low class or showing lack of competency? I notice that so = mny large Episcopal and Catholic churches have people playing things like = the Final from Viernes 6th for voluntaries. GREAT pieces and I love them. = but in church? I think the most ambitious i get in Church is Litanies, and = a few other pieces. I sometime s do the Franck A Minor Chorale for an extended prelude durin Lent. But I NEVER close my self to the wealth of = hymn arrangements out there by Gordon Young, Diane Bish, and that liking. the Kevin Mehew books, distributed by MelBay in the US www.melbay.com has = some excellent Episcopal tunes in their books. Many are very = sight-readable too. And great buys! The books of Noel Rawsthorne are = great. And their books tha have 60 and 100 pieces in them for $25-50 = dollars are great. They have theior Hymn Prelude books for year round. Go = check em out. Check to see if a book known as The Triumphs of His Grace by Lana Kelley = is still in print. Got a few tunes in i that no other books have. Im going to use their "tell a friend" option to send you some forwards.       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60649 http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster.  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Preludes & Postludes for Episcopalian hymns From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 12:50:57 -0800   There are more than you think (grin); they just have to be ferreted out. True, not a lot has been written yet for the NEW tunes, but most of the standard Anglican tunes can be found in several settings by Stanford, Willan, Thalben-Ball, Bairstow, etc.   There's a cross-index, either in the Hymnal itself, or in the excellent "Episcopal Musicians' Handbook", available from The Living Church Foundation.   That said, I do have to add that I agree with Bruce Cornely in this instance (mark THAT down!) ... ALL the organ music doesn't NECESSARILY have to be based on that day's hymns. I often improvised a partita during the communion hymn; I never paid attention (as some older Anglican organists did) to the key relationship between the opening voluntary and the processional, or the recessional and the closing voluntary. In both instances, I simply lifted my hands, punched a general, and began in the new key. Nor did the voluntaries necessarily have to be based upon the hymns.   Cheers,   Bud   Gerald Montagna wrote:   > I'm wondering what organists do for hymn preludes & postludes for > tunes that are used by Episcopal 1982 and which (1) aren't based on > Lutheran tunes and (2) aren't for major feasts. I find that it's > very difficult to obtain quality works on these neglected tunes, > generally I'm lucky if I have one or two per tune in my collection > and with so little competition the quality is often unsatisfactory. > In some cases I don't have any works at all even for hymns that are > frequently used. It just seems that nearly everything being > published comes from organists active in Lutheran or Methodist > churches. Do Episcopalian organists just improvise preludes and > postludes on these tunes (i.e., the tunes which are little-used > outside Hymnal 1982), or don't they bother trying to work them into > the service, or is there some trove of Anglican-focused hymn preludes > and postludes that I've never stumbled upon? "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: > mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: > mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: > mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Anglican organs From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 16:18:36 EST   Dear SD,   I'm not sure I can put "Hear my Prayer" at the top of my English list, but =   it's pretty darn close!   BH SJE Boston    
(back) Subject: Re: Video Projectors, Hymnals, etc. From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Wed, 03 Mar 2004 05:30:44 +0800   There will be no Public Displays of Affection!!! :-) Of course, if they are looking up, they're not singing into the hymnal or = the black of a little old lady's pill-box hat.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 14:27:31 -0600 To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: Video Projectors, Hymnals, etc.   Take away the Projectors - Bring in the PDA's.   David E   David Evangelides Colorado Springs, Colorado     -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   -- ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: RE: Anglican organs From: "Shaun Brown" <S.D.Brown@exeter.ac.uk> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 21:38:55 -0000   Wesley was Organist at Exeter Cathedral. I don't know if he went elsewhere, but he was certainly here for a time   Shaun Brown s.d.brown@ex.ac.uk ICQ: 240-836-397 D409 Lafrowda Flats Cornwall House The University of Exeter Exeter, Devon EX4 6TJ 07814096356 ext. 3160   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Colin Mitchell Sent: 02 March 2004 19:06 To: PipeChat Subject: RE: Anglican organs   Hello,   As I understand it, the music of Byrd bridges the period of the Reformation proper; changing as it does from Latin to vernacular English as time went on.   During the Restoration, an attempt was made to re-build the great tradition of the cathedrals and collegiate churches; and in this, Purcell was the leading light.   Following this, the church went into austerity mode, and so dull did religion become outside the cathedrals, it was held only in scant respect by most. Nevertheless, the choral services continued in the cathedrals (Boyce is especially ravishing), whilst parishes had to make do with metrical psalmody and not much else. The same thing was, of course, happening in Holland.   The Oxford movement saw a change to that state of affairs, but in reality, even that was a knee-jerk response to the breakaway non-conformists such as the Methodists and the hymnody of the Wesley's, and also the Congregationalists, who re-introduced proper paslmody, some stirring hymns and the singing of anthems. Consider that Dr Gauntlett was both a friend of Mendelssohn and Prince Albert and he was one of the leading lights in Victorian church music.   The Anglicans entered the church music race quite late, but of course, once they did, they did so brilliantly. Refer to S S Wesley, for instance, and his work at Leeds Parish Church and at Hereford....or was it Worcester? I can never remember which river he fell into!   Perhaps the most extraordinary fact is, that in an age of severe decline such as we see to-day, cathedral music continues to flourish and seems to invite compositions from some fine composers.   Meanwhile....back in the parishes! Yuk!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Shaun Brown <S.D.Brown@exeter.ac.uk> wrote: > One of you appears to be referring to the religious > reformation (ie, the > creation of the Church of England (1548) or the > musical reformation, > generally considered to be post-purcell. There was > very little music > written in england after purcel, until the very late > 19th Century.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you're looking for faster http://search.yahoo.com "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: RE: Anglican organs From: "Shaun Brown" <S.D.Brown@exeter.ac.uk> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 21:40:09 -0000   Yes, the Byred is great, but its pre-reformation!   Shaun Brown s.d.brown@ex.ac.uk ICQ: 240-836-397 D409 Lafrowda Flats Cornwall House The University of Exeter Exeter, Devon EX4 6TJ 07814096356 ext. 3160   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of quilisma@cox.net Sent: 02 March 2004 18:34 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Anglican organs       Shaun Brown wrote:   > One of you appears to be referring to the religious reformation (ie, the > creation of the Church of England (1548) or the musical reformation, > generally considered to be post-purcell. There was very little music > written in england after purcel, until the very late 19th Century.   On the contrary, there's a whole body of music that's only now just coming to light ... our Village Choir series here in the USA includes music of the Webbes, etc. It's too bad that Boyce's "Cathedral Music" is   so expensive ... there are some real treasures in that, as well.   Yes, Handel DID dominate the English baroque period, and it IS a shame he didn't write for the Anglican liturgy. A Mag and Nunc or a Communion Service by Handel ... just IMAGINE what fun THAT would be (grin)!   I'm curious at your use of the term "musical reformation" ... yes, there   was a decided shift in styles after the Interregnum, but you have such monuments as the Byrd "Great Service" which precede Purcell by quite a bit.   Then > we have such composers as Howells, Parry, Stanford, Wood, Vaughan > Williams, Sumsion, Mathias, then onto Rutter, Chilcott, Carter, and most > recently, the huge numbers of commissions by large choirs by Cathedral > Organists, such as Richard Shepherd, Malcom Archer, Peter Gould, Francis > Jackson. Many of them do indeed make use of the quintessential english > organ tone, full organ, big reeds, sharp mixtures, solo tubas! But many > of them call for very light, french registration. Take Mathias' "Let > the People Praise Thee, O God", Or Archer's "Come, my Way, My Truth, My > Life". > > Also, in your list of Purcell Repertoire, you seem to have omitted the > best of the lot, and in my opinion, the finest piece of English Choral > music ever written. > > "Hear my Prayer, O Lord"   I omitted it because it's quite beyond most Anglican PARISH choirs here in the USA. Outside of a small handful of churches, we don't really have   anything corresponding to the cathedral/collegiate church orbit as it exists in the UK. That was pointed up in the recent discussion about how   American Anglicans receive their training, and the outcry in some quarters about John Scott being appointed to St. Thomas' Church in New York City.   Cheers,   Bud     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: The Highway Code part 1 From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 21:36:03 +0000 (GMT)   There was another quartet - maybe the same one - who set the Highway Code to Anglican Chant. (to those of you who've never heard of it, this gives the guidelines to those learning to drive instructions as to what to do, e.g. "ignore all keep left signs, these are purely political slogans," or somesuch. John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Public dishonesty Passion aroused     ___________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends today! Download Messenger Now http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Preludes & Postludes for Episcopalian hymns From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 15:47:00 -0600   Along with the publishers others have mentioned, look at Oxford University Press, Paraclete Press, Selah Publishing Co., and Augsburg Fortress.   Since you've given me the opportunity, I should mention that I've written = a few "Anglican-focused" hymn voluntaries that are or will be available this year (e.g., from Paraclete: Love Unknown, Lauda anima, Down Ampney, Rosedale, Land of Rest, and Crucifer) with more to come in 2005 and 2006. Trust me, these are not cutesy, dumbed-down arrangements.   Robert Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Gerald Montagna <geraldrm@earthlink.net>   > I'm wondering what organists do for hymn preludes & postludes for tunes that are used by Episcopal 1982 and which (1) aren't based on Lutheran = tunes and (2) aren't for major feasts. I find that it's very difficult to = obtain quality works on these neglected tunes, generally I'm lucky if I have one = or two per tune in my collection and with so little competition the quality = is often unsatisfactory. In some cases I don't have any works at all even = for hymns that are frequently used. It just seems that nearly everything = being published comes from organists active in Lutheran or Methodist churches. = Do Episcopalian organists just improvise preludes and postludes on these = tunes (i.e., the tunes which are little-used outside Hymnal 1982), or don't they bother trying to work them into the service, or is there some trove of Anglican-focused hymn preludes and postludes that I've never stumbled = upon?      
(back) Subject: Re: should the organist be a member of the denomination? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2004 13:49:57 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Arie makes a very valid point, but history shows that there are many ministers of religion and countless musicians who have fallen well short of the mark!   Actually, having been involved in professional/semi-professional church music, and having accompanied any number of "sacred works," I can tell him that the last thing on my mind has been God.   I am far from interested in self-promotion and showing off.....I am far too busy trying to get the notes right.   I've always maintained that, in my quieter and more contemplative moments, I have always preferred silence to the infernal din of music.   The trouble is, many people who are not involved in music making, just cannot understand how detached from worship a musician often feels.....we are too tied up with the music!   I am a non-catholic, catholic organist.     Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Arie Vandenberg <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> wrote: > > Colin, > > If a church is a group of people.....the organist should be part of the > family, and as such be > a member of the denomination, or congregation. > > All aspects of worship should be pointing the same > direction, to God, to > the glory of God.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster http://search.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Beau Surratt From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 16:03:03 -0600   Hi! I am, as you figured, a male. I just used that title to illistrate sarcastically (on several levels, if you know what I mean) what a really grandiose title is! :)     Blessings, Beau