PipeChat Digest #4344 - Friday, March 5, 2004
 
Re: Re:We have an anonymous Repub in the house--off topic
  by <Praestant@aol.com>
Re: Singing from a jumbotron
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Another interesting apparatus
  by <Praestant@aol.com>
Re: Another interesting apparatus
  by "Travis Evans" <tlevans@sbcglobal.net>
St. Turibius
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Illuminated stop controls
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
RE: Fan Trumpets are not en chamade
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Another interesting apparatus
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Fast and Loud Lent Music
  by "Kris Layton" <kml@mcihispeed.net>
Re: Illuminated stop controls
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: CCM terminology
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Illuminated stop controls
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: St. Turibius
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: We have an anonymous Repub in the house--off topic
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Fast and Loud Lent Music
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
ALL READ NOW!!!!! Re: We have an anonymous Repub in the house--off topic
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
RE: Fan Trumpets are not en chamade
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Illuminated stop controls
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: CCM terminology
  by <reedstop@charter.net>
RE: off-topic posts
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: The Tuba at York
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Welcome to PipeChat?
  by "Ken" <mewzishn@optonline.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Re:We have an anonymous Repub in the house--off topic From: <Praestant@aol.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 12:29:43 EST     In a message dated 5.3.04 7.55.26 AM, RMB10@aol.com writes:     > (one of my best friends is--gasp!-get a load of this--Black and gay, and = a > hold on to your seats now--a Republican!) >   Is he also Jewish and a Nazi?    
(back) Subject: Re: Singing from a jumbotron From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 12:30:17 EST   In a message dated 3/5/2004 11:46:17 AM Eastern Standard Time, PEMMONS@wcupa.edu writes:   > > >Then there's the need to have someone create the slides for the service = on > Powerpoint or some other presentation software, along with (hopefully!) = hard > copy of the bulletin for those who either can't see the screens or hate = them > so much they refuse to look at them at all   pre fab versions abound.......   the careful and well trained leader can run the computer from the keyboard = or piano if no one else is there to do so.   we can do anything just look at want ads and so on.   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Another interesting apparatus From: <Praestant@aol.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 12:32:11 EST     In a message dated 5.3.04 12.29.51 PM, nicemusica@yahoo.com writes:     > I was thinking of Steiner Reck, who also uses it today. >   Are Steiner-Reck still building? I thought the principals had retired or closed shop, in which case this would be an historic rather current = example.    
(back) Subject: Re: Another interesting apparatus From: "Travis Evans" <tlevans@sbcglobal.net> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 09:38:18 -0800 (PST)   The Shoenstein at First Plymouth UCC in Lincoln Nebraska has this as well, = though a bit of a variation, they are like small knobs that pull out, = samme sort of one that the Schlicker in the music building had at = Concordia Seward for the combo system. http://www.firstplymouth.org/organs/images/console_schoenstein.jpg You can see them just under the coupler rail in the photo if you go to the = link above. Travis     "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> wrote:In the position where a = coupler rail would usually be, there is a square shaped box which has = movable switches for the expression pedals. For example, you can make any = expression shoe operate any of the divisions. OR, you can make all = divisions expressive on any one of the expression shoes. All you do is = move the switches to which ever position you want.      
(back) Subject: St. Turibius From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 12:48:36 -0500     This is what I found on the Web about St. Turibius.   ST. TURIBIUS OF MONGROVEJO   St. Turibius was born in 1538 in Leon, Spain. He became a university professor and then a famous judge. He was a fine Christian with a reputation for being honest and wise.   An unusual thing happened to him that changed his whole life. He was asked =   to become the archbishop of Lima, Peru. First of all, he was not a priest. =   Second, Peru was in far-away South America. This happened because Lima needed an archbishop. Many people in the Church realized that Turibius had =   the qualities for such a trusted position. He begged to be excused from = the honor. But when he learned about the miserable condition of the native people of Peru, he could not refuse. He wanted to help them and to bring them the faith. He was ordained a priest and set out for Peru.   As archbishop, St. Turibius traveled all over the country. He made his way =   over the snowy mountains on foot. He walked over the hot sands of the seashore. He built churches and hospitals. He started the first school in Latin America for the training of priests. Such a school is called a seminary. He leaned the different native languages. He wanted the people = to be able to listen to homilies at Mass and go to confession in their own language. He protected the natives who were often cruelly treated by their =   Conquerors.   St. Turibius loved the people of Peru. He spent the rest of his life as a priest and bishop for them. He died on March 23, 1606, at the age of sixty-eight. St. Turibius was proclaimed a saint by Pope Benedict XIII in = 1726.   We don't want to be fooled into judging the importance of people by the amount of money they have or the expensive things they own. Each one is important because God is the Father of us all. We can ask St. Turibius to help us treat every person with respect and kindness as he did.   I hope that this might tell you all you need to know about him.   Bob Conway          
(back) Subject: Illuminated stop controls From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 12:55:12 EST   Illuminated stop controls, while remaining a fascination for those who =   are mesmerized by small, shiny objects, are impractical. This is = particularly true of the push on / push off variety, where there is no PHYSICAL way of determining the status of a stop once the little light bulb has burned = out. I once played an imitation instrument that sported drawknobs that lit when pulled, and extinguished when pushed again. However, they were = spring-loaded like a pinball launcher, and snapped back to "off position" whether on or off. So in addition to throwing off one's traditional, spatial sense of = what a drawknob should be, one also had to eventually deal with replacing the = light source. They were the most noticeably flimsy bits of plastic I had ever encountered. The domed, ground glass of early 20th century luminous pipe = organ controls, albeit more elegant and sturdy, was no more practical. Console gimmickery has reached spectacular heights, and while such = things might be desirable for effects in VERY complex services that border on theatrical productions, there really is not an abundance of literature = written for such things. I believe that the great organ literature, and much of the = liturgy of the mainstream denominations, was conceived for organs of limited = gadgetry. I would rather direct the funds toward a more elegant case, an = additional stop, the extension of a short-compass stop to full range, or higher = quality materials in the keyboards or pipe metal. Or maybe even putting it into = the maintenance endowment for the instrument.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   ..  
(back) Subject: RE: Fan Trumpets are not en chamade From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 18:11:47 -0000   At my grandmother's home town (or rather village) of Usk in = Monmouthshire, they have an organ in the parish church with some startling en chamade pipework. It was originally built by Gray & Davison in London in 1860, = at a cost of =A31,094, for Llandaff Cathedral. The scheme was devised by Sir Frederick Gore Ouseley. It was rebuilt at Usk in 1890. I have a couple = of photos of this interesting organ, and I'll try and upload them to the pictures area. The Great Trumpet 8 is en chamade, and I don't know if = you would describe it as a Fan Trumpet, but the pipes certainly emerge from = the casework in a kind of fan shape!   Will Light Coventry UK     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Emmons, Paul Sent: 05 March 2004 17:03 To: PipeChat Subject: RE: Fan Trumpets are not en chamade   Didn't York Minster have a horizontal tuba in the 19th century? Perhaps = it still does. The tuba on that organ is very powerful (and smooth). According to recordings, it upstages full organ whenever it's used, and people who have heard it first-hand say that this is true-to life. =20   I have been there and heard the organ, but not the tuba. It was an = evensong sung by a guest choir from a school, with a guest organist. Although = they sang well, they were unused to such a large building, and the organ = drowned out them out frequently without even trying. (The cathedral choir would sing an all-Palestrina concert by candlelight later that evening.) =20       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Another interesting apparatus From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 10:18:05 -0800 (PST)   Steiner Reck built a 2000 organ back home for the church I grew up in = after becoing Episcopalian. I don't know if they are colsed or not.   Praestant@aol.com wrote: In a message dated 5.3.04 12.29.51 PM, nicemusica@yahoo.com writes:     I was thinking of Steiner Reck, who also uses it today.       Are Steiner-Reck still building? I thought the principals had retired or = closed shop, in which case this would be an historic rather current = example.           From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60649 http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster.  
(back) Subject: Fast and Loud Lent Music From: "Kris Layton" <kml@mcihispeed.net> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 11:34:59 -0700 (GMT-07:00)   On 3/5/2004 at 8:43 AM, Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> wrote:   "Not a lot of fast/loud Lent music out there..."   I found a fast and loud one for Sunday - a toccata on RATHBUN (In the = Cross of Christ I Glory) by David Cherwien. It is in the Lent volume of = the Augsburg Organ Library - a fine Lutheran musician's arrangement of a = fine Lutheran hymn! ;-)   Kris Layton  
(back) Subject: Re: Illuminated stop controls From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 10:53:08 -0800   Unfortunately, one of their appeals IS cost ... non-moving (or those spring-loaded drawknobs that light up) are cheaper to build, mostly because of the combination action ... nothing has to be physically MOVED.   I played a fair-sized 3m analog Rodgers from the 1980s for several years that had them ... MY only objection was the difficulty in changing the bulbs. It required the tech to open up the stop jamb and SOLDER the replacement. But I imagine with LEDs that problem has been solved now.   I didn't find them confusing ... they CAN be where there's strong natural light, or TV lights, etc. ... in the older organs, if you turned the brightness up too high, the plastic drawknobs would MELT (chuckle).   Personally, I don't LIKE drawknob consoles ... I have arthritis in my neck and poor peripheral vision. I MUCH prefer an Austin, Schlicker, or Holtkamp console with everything on tongues or tabs right in front of me. Not as elegant or traditional, to be sure ... but it makes hand-registering (remember hand-registering?) a LOT easier.   Cheers,   Bud   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > Illuminated stop controls, while remaining a fascination for those = who > are mesmerized by small, shiny objects, are impractical. This is = particularly > true of the push on / push off variety, where there is no PHYSICAL way = of > determining the status of a stop once the little light bulb has burned = out. > I once played an imitation instrument that sported drawknobs that = lit > when pulled, and extinguished when pushed again. However, they were = spring-loaded > like a pinball launcher, and snapped back to "off position" whether on = or > off. So in addition to throwing off one's traditional, spatial sense of = what a > drawknob should be, one also had to eventually deal with replacing the = light > source. They were the most noticeably flimsy bits of plastic I had ever =   > encountered. The domed, ground glass of early 20th century luminous pipe = organ > controls, albeit more elegant and sturdy, was no more practical. > Console gimmickery has reached spectacular heights, and while such = things > might be desirable for effects in VERY complex services that border on > theatrical productions, there really is not an abundance of literature = written for > such things. I believe that the great organ literature, and much of the = liturgy > of the mainstream denominations, was conceived for organs of limited = gadgetry. > I would rather direct the funds toward a more elegant case, an = additional > stop, the extension of a short-compass stop to full range, or higher = quality > materials in the keyboards or pipe metal. Or maybe even putting it into = the > maintenance endowment for the instrument. > > Sebastian M. Gluck > New York City > > . > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: CCM terminology From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 13:46:11 -0500   On 3/5/04 12:04 PM, "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> wrote:   > I agee that the broad use of terminology is a problem. Words are used = by some > groups to identify things with other meaning to other groups or with = simply > too many meanings.   It's endemic, or pandemic, or something. Even words like "Church" have different meanings to different people. Also "catholic," "evangelical," "Christian," etc. Music/liturgy is just one good field of examples.   I call it "terminological larceny." Wrote an essay on it a couple years ago; if I come across it promptly, I'll send you a copy.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Illuminated stop controls From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 13:46:31 EST   In a message dated 3/5/2004 12:57:54 PM Eastern Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:   > in addition to throwing off one's traditional, spatial sense of what a > drawknob should be, one also had to eventually deal with replacing the = light >   i have never felt like i need to approach the master builder here but i = must,   the spatial sense is replaced by the visual sense---and yes it may take a while to get used to it... although i do find pushing in for OFF AND ON a = bit unusual.   most light bulbs never burn out low wattage and voltage and are easily replaced if they do.   going around and playing different types of organs and of all make size = shape and creed--there is nothing wrong with lights......just different.   Please let me repeat, I prefer real everything including drawknobs but i = can play on most anything and find something to like about it. even lighted stops.   i remain humble in the presence of TubaMagna,   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Turibius From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 10:47:54 -0800 (PST)   Interestingly, the church is formed very much on Turibius' principles. We = are welcoming and loving to all who come thru the doors, and we strive to = make worship in peoples native languages a top priority.       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60649 http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster.  
(back) Subject: Re: We have an anonymous Repub in the house--off topic From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 13:51:23 -0500   On 3/5/04 12:29 PM, "Praestant@aol.com" <Praestant@aol.com> wrote:   > (one of my best friends is--gasp!-get a load of this--Black and gay, and = a > hold on to your seats now--a Republican!) > > > Is he also Jewish and a Nazi? > This list is starting to stink real rotten.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Fast and Loud Lent Music From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 10:55:54 -0800 (PST)   Oh my! I was playing thru the Cherwein Toccata the other day. That's a = nice piece indeed. Some fast loud pieces you may find useful for Lent are Pierne's Prelude in = G minor and Alain's Litanies. usually those pieces would have been learned = in ones college time tho, and become in the hands/feet. One of the hymn tunes of the season is Herzliebster (spelling?) Jesu. I = did an arrangement of iths by James Pethel this past weekend, and will do = Cherwein's arrangement of it this weekend. Next weekend, I will do Michael = Burkhardt's setting, then the more famous one from Helmut Walcha's choral = preludes. For a loud postlude type of setting on this tune, Mark Bloedow = has one in his collection thru Morning Star Music. I think Walter Pelz has = a very big toccata setting on the tune Erhault uns Herr, which is a goot = tune for Lent.   Melbay/Mayhew's collection the Lent and Easter Collection has good = settings. A good buy as well, at $24.95 for 25 or 30 pieces.       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60649 http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster.  
(back) Subject: ALL READ NOW!!!!! Re: We have an anonymous Repub in the house--off topic From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 12:59:08 -0600   I asked nicely last night to drop this thread. I now DEMAND that it be dropped IMMEDIATELY! If I come home tonight and find all sorts of emails with this subject line of "We have an anonymous..." I will drop those people posting from the list immediately without asking any questions.   Several of you seem to have the need to get the last word in, however, my word is the Last Word on this topic!   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Fan Trumpets are not en chamade From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 11:02:50 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Aha!   Paul missed my recent reference to the horizontal (behind the case pipes) Tuba Mirabilus at York (25" wg)   It's as rough a piece of voicing as you will ever hear, with barely two notes the same.....but we hold it in great affection! There's just "something about it" which we all love around this part of the world, and of course, it has inspired some real organ music by Dr Francis Jackson.   His Toccata, Choral & Fugue really does call for the rank, and the Fanfare in G was written specifically for it.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> wrote: > Didn't York Minster have a horizontal tuba in the > 19th century? Perhaps it still does.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster http://search.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Illuminated stop controls From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 11:07:41 -0800 (PST)   Well, of course, you all probably know...I like moving drawknobs. Stop = tablets on burbed jambs that move ccan be cute too. But I'm a = traditionalist.     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60649 http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster.  
(back) Subject: Re: CCM terminology From: <reedstop@charter.net> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 19:09:20 +0000   Margo, I have some differences in what you said (but not disagreeing with = you.) In our "Praise" service, we don't always do solely up-beat/up-tempo = music. We also do slow and soft, and even minor keys. (So that = eliminates "happy"). We do NOT, repeat NOT, clap along at Holy Trinity. = Praise Team members (for lack of a better term yet) use small percussion = instruments, but we're Lutherans...we do not clap in worship. (We do = applaud anniversaries, newly baptised babies, etc, though, but they just = don't "get into it" with clapping along with the songs. In fact, we're = lucky to get most of them to SING. Yes, that's a problem.   I know what you're saying....my only point is to demonstrate that not all = "CCM"/"H/C" services are similar. Again, variety... :)   Regards, Jeff   > And I guess that is one of the reasons why I like and use the term > "happy-clappy" (which was invented on this list, I think - or maybe the > other list). It describes what is different about it without implying > that praising God is something that other sacred music doesn't do. It > is "happy" and "clappy" - they are in there singing up-beat happy songs > and clapping along    
(back) Subject: RE: off-topic posts From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 11:19:42 -0800   Once again, I invite folks to join   orgofftop@yahoogroups.com   which was created for off-topic discussions arising among organists and lovers of the organ.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Re: The Tuba at York From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 14:38:08 EST   In a message dated 3/5/04 11:19:41 AM Central Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:   > The Tuba on the old recordings, the enormously fat and round one, is not =   > the > same as the Tuba we hear today, which does NOT get good reviews.   Are not there TWO big-scale tubas at York? I had always heard that there were two, and apparently one is on the rood screen.   Scott F. Foppiano Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.    
(back) Subject: Welcome to PipeChat? From: "Ken" <mewzishn@optonline.net> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 14:51:57 -0500     On 5 Mar 2004, at 12.29 PM, Praestant@aol.com wrote:   > Is he also Jewish and a Nxxx   I just rejoined this list after a lengthy time away, and this is what I find. Perhaps I should have stayed away.   Kenneth L. Sybesma Choirmaster and Organist Church of the Advent, Westbury NY Temple Organist & Director of Children's Music Temple Or Elohim, Jericho NY