PipeChat Digest #4346 - Friday, March 5, 2004
 
music notes in the bulletin?
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Selective expression and "infinite frustration"
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
RE: Another interesting apparatus .... Austin too !
  by "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com>
RE: Illuminated stop controls
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Welcome to PipeChat?
  by <reedstop@charter.net>
Felix Hell.  Announcement of his 350th recital.
  by <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Re: Selective expression and "infinite frustration"
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: music notes in the bulletin?
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Welcome to PipeChat?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: console apparati and cool stops
  by "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com>
Re: Nitsua
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Re: console apparati and cool stops
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
controlling drawknobs with one's foot
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Subject: Re: Re: Jumbotrons and such
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Episcopal hymns
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
PipeChat
  by "Nina Robart" <ninarae@cyberport.net>
Re: Another interesting apparatus .... Austin too !
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Monty's New Ruffati
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: console apparati and cool stops
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Re: Illuminated stop controls
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Fan Trumpets are not en chamade
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
RE: Fast and Loud Lent Music
  by "Shaun Brown" <S.D.Brown@exeter.ac.uk>
 

(back) Subject: music notes in the bulletin? From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 17:37:54 EST   During February, in honor of Black History Month, all of my organ music = was by African-American composers. In the bulletin, I put brief bios about = the composers and had short "program notes" about the pieces. The first = couple of weeks, I didn't hear any feedback about it, but the past few weeks, people = have been coming up to me saying how much they appreciated the notes and that = they found the bios interesting. Do any of you do music notes in the church bulletin on a regular basis--I mean other than on special occasions such = as Christmas music or the Children's Choir performance? I'm thinking of = doing this on a regular basis (well, as space permits) because even the secretary who does = all our graphic design work has gotten into it. One week I forgot to attach = the bio of the composer to the email I sent her with my music for the week, so = she went on the internet and did research and sent me a bio for my approval = before she published the bulletin. I just wanted other people's thoughts on = this. I had never done it before, but I thought that for Black History Month, I would highlight some of the composers I was playing, and it obviously went = over well with my congregation.   Monty Benett    
(back) Subject: Selective expression and "infinite frustration" From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 17:41:57 EST   Casavant also used the expression selectors, at least through the = 1920s, if not longer. Beautifully made ivory sliders that assigned various sets = of blades to different balanced pedals were up above the fourth or fifth = manual. As far as the Willis "infinite gradation/frustration" expression shoe, =   dial indicators notwithstanding, for the normally-trained organist, such = shoes are confusing. I am not talking about people who say, "I grew up with = those, and frankly, after forty years, I find it natural." I'm talking about = somebody who has been trained on standard instruments.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   ..  
(back) Subject: RE: Another interesting apparatus .... Austin too ! From: "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 14:44:43 -0800 (PST)   Hi All, The first pipe organ I ever practiced on was a large 4 manual Austin built = in 1929. It had the selectable sliders and I have always thought them to = be highly desirable. For one thing, this organ had 5 expression pedals = plus the crescendo. Talk about intimidating to someone just starting out = !! I'm surprised the E-org builders haven't used it where the PEDAL is = usually under expression and this would allow you to express it with = whatever manual division you are using to accompany a solo line ... = instead of the usual practice of having it express with the GREAT. Matt     --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster.  
(back) Subject: RE: Illuminated stop controls From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 14:51:00 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Hee hee!   When I used to practise on the huge (182 stops or so?) Compton at Hull City Hall, with its luminous stops, I used to play to the gallery a bit when people came along to listen.   I would draw out a pair of sunglasses and press General no.8!!!!!!!!!!   Sebastian misses a VITAL advantage of luminous stops.....the ability to nudge them on with the elbows whilst playing seamlessly. (You need good aim of course!)   Now this is a whole lot better, and demands far less athleticism than kicking a stop in with the foot, or winkling one out with the toe of one's Organ Masters!   Don't laugh! I saw this done during concert, by Simon Lindley at Leeds Town Hall!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> wrote:   > ....an organ console so full of flashing lights ......don't need a Christmas tree     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster http://search.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Welcome to PipeChat? From: <reedstop@charter.net> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 22:55:42 +0000   > I just rejoined this list after a lengthy time away, and this is what I > find. Perhaps I should have stayed away. > > Kenneth L. Sybesma   Nah, Ken,....this just literally happened. I think everyone would agree = it hasn't been a constant thing. If anything, you can back at a perfect = time since the thread is dead.   Jeff    
(back) Subject: Felix Hell. Announcement of his 350th recital. From: <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Sat, 6 Mar 2004 00:07:25 +0100       Dear List,   Thanks to Rich Blacklock for publishing Felix's March-14-concert on PIPORG-L. As he is not member of this list, let me publish it here. Felix will be performing his 350th career recital on Sunday, March 14, 2 pm, at Trinity United Methodist Church in Huntsville, Alabama. The concert celebrates the 51st anniversary season of the Huntsville Chamber Music Guild (HMG). The whole concert series of the HMG started in October last year on occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Guild.   Word is that approximately 800 tickets have already been sold. The church seats 1200   Ticket information is available from Dr. Wilson Luquire at the UA Huntsville Library: (256) 824-6540.   The HMG website is: http://www.hcmgconcerts.uah.edu/performances.htm   In addition to the concert Felix will host three educational sessions on organ topics for local high school students.   Hans-Friedrich Hell      
(back) Subject: Re: Selective expression and "infinite frustration" From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 15:10:52 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Ah! Brindley & Foster here in the UK, had a "Brindgradus" system of stop control.....entirely pneumatic of course....and that was around 1870 (?)   Fascinating system, but difficult to get a hold on.   I think there are only about two or three left, and both of them are within 10 miles of me.   I am one who finds the Willis centre-position return very expression pedals very confusing, but regular users such as Prof Ian Treacy at Liverpool Cathedral, think they are the Bees Knees.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster http://search.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: music notes in the bulletin? From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 18:16:18 -0500   on 3/5/04 5:37 PM, RMB10@aol.com at RMB10@aol.com wrote:   During February, in honor of Black History Month, all of my organ music = was by African-American composers. In the bulletin, I put brief bios about = the composers and had short "program notes" about the pieces. The first = couple of weeks, I didn't hear any feedback about it, but the past few weeks, people have been coming up to me saying how much they appreciated the = notes and that they found the bios interesting. Do any of you do music notes in the church bulletin on a regular basis--I mean other than on special occasions such as Christmas music or the Children's Choir performance? = I'm thinking of doing this on a regular basis (well, as space permits) because even the secretary who does all our graphic design work has gotten into = it. One week I forgot to attach the bio of the composer to the email I sent = her with my music for the week, so she went on the internet and did research = and sent me a bio for my approval before she published the bulletin. I just wanted other people's thoughts on this. I had never done it before, but I thought that for Black History Month, I would highlight some of the composers I was playing, and it obviously went over well with my congregation. Monty Benett     I've been doing bulletin notes averaging 300 words for the past year or = so. People really like them. I think they read them during the sermon. I = find Cyberhymnal a great resource. And of course the web generally. It's amazing what one can find. I usually include notes about the hymns (once = I went off on a tangent involving Joachim Neander and Neanderthal Man), = about the composers of the organ voluntaries and about the anthem.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu        
(back) Subject: Re: Welcome to PipeChat? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 18:21:13 -0500   On 3/5/04 5:55 PM, "reedstop@charter.net" <reedstop@charter.net> wrote:   >> I just rejoined this list after a lengthy time away, and this is what I >> find. Perhaps I should have stayed away. >> >> Kenneth L. Sybesma > > Nah, Ken,....this literally just happened. I think everyone would agree = it > hasn't been a constant thing. If anything, you [came] back at a perfect = time > since the thread is dead. > > Jeff > Yes; Jeff is quite right, and PEE TEE ELL!   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: console apparati and cool stops From: "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 17:48:08 -0600   Ahhh, the simple joys of a brand new Peterson capture combon action! = After two weeks of rewiring the entire instrument at my church, we put power to = it today. What a wonderful sight to see all those pretty LEDs on the console =   boards light up.   We have the basic MSP 1000 unit sans piston sequencer, which would've been =   nice as I tend to forget betimes what I put on what piston! I ain't complainin' though. No more will I have to push twice to be sure it took.   Didn't Ruffatti use those light-up drawknobs in the past? Rodgers did and =   still does if you want them. I've seen a handsome Berghaus in Highland, = IN that had rows of lighted rectangular buttons--the only instrument they did =   that way. St. Sebald's, Nurnburg has a Willi Peter instrument with all = its light-up stop buttons on one side of the keyboreds. Looks cool, but is it =   really as convenient as grabbing a chorus with one hand on a drawknob console? I'll take knobs any day over anything else!   What, pray tell, is a Nitsua? Devon gave me a few discs recorded at = Christ Church, Oak Brook. As I'm perusing the stoplist of the 80-rank Austin/Allen, I see this stop listed on the Antiphonal Great. An Austin = in Tulsa had a Dulciana in the Choir called Suavial.   Of course, for a complete pallette of reed-tone, you just can't go without = a 16' Traschkann or a 32' Rumblefaart!   jim   O):^)   _________________________________________________________________ Find things fast with the new MSN Toolbar =96 includes FREE pop-up = blocking! http://clk.atdmt.com/AVE/go/onm00200414ave/direct/01/    
(back) Subject: Re: Nitsua From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 16:19:13 -0700       james nerstheimer wrote: >   > > What, pray tell, is a Nitsua?   A string found only on an Austin - it is Austin spelled backwards.   Del W. Case Pacific Union College  
(back) Subject: Re: console apparati and cool stops From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 19:18:26 EST   Dear Jim:   Nitsua is Austin spelled backwards. A beautiful soft stop, tappered too like an Erzahller.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: controlling drawknobs with one's foot From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 18:57:30 -0600   I nudged in a drawknob with my foot on the E.M. Skinner organ at St. = Luke's Episcopal Church, Evanston, Illinois, in a recital I gave there on January 5, 1964. Yes, shudder, 40 years ago. Can't remember the piece, although I = do recall some of the pieces I played (something from Messiaen's Nativity, = the shorter of the two Bruhns E-Minor Preludes and Fugues, the Bach G Major = (BWV 541), Franck's Choral in B Minor, Alain's Litanies).   One amusing sidelight: Some techies from Saville organs, for whom I did = some recitalizing and demonstrating, taped the recital much to the = consternation of, but eventual okay by, John Boe, then O/C at the church. He was afraid the Saville people would use the sounds somehow to develop various electronic stops of their own. Sort of a precursor of sampling, what? His fears might have been justified even back then.   Robert Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> > Now this is a whole lot better, and demands far less > athleticism than kicking a stop in with the foot, or > winkling one out with the toe of one's Organ Masters! > > Don't laugh! I saw this done during concert, by Simon > Lindley at Leeds Town Hall! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK    
(back) Subject: Re: Subject: Re: Re: Jumbotrons and such From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 18:52:30 -0500   Well,   People sometimes write this sort of stuff on the list - "My church is such and such, and is fabulous, and you'll never hear better music anywhere." That sort of thing. Then they tell you where it is, and, as in Charlie's case, it is at one end of the known world, so the chances are only those listers on the left coast might get there, and they are mostly employed on Sunday mornings. In other words, Charlie is safe from discovery of the truth. Well, some years ago, I was visiting in the Los Angeles area, and showed up at Charlie's church, unannounced. So this time, in a completely black congregation, there were TWO white specks. Charlie up at the Organs, bouncing between the Justin Kramer Pipe Organ and the Hammond, and Malcolm sitting out in the congregation. Oh, sorry, and also the Pastor. Well, the moment came when people who were visiting were asked to identify = themselves. When this happens, I usually shrink down into the seat and try to hide. There was no chance this time, but my presence actually fit right in with something that had been announced earlier in the service. A questionnaire had been given out with the bulletin, and it concerned the use of = computers by the congregation, with the idea that some sort of computer program = might be begun at the church. I was able to say that I was visiting from Connecticut, a visit brought about by the computer. I explained just a bit about PipOrg-L, and how I had met Charlie through it, and how much he had spoken of his love for that church. Wow! Anyway, I must say no more, = because way back then, I did a posting on PipOrg-L about the service in some = detail. It was really GREAT, and despite the fact that it was three hours and ten minutes in length, I would go again. You should be able to find that posting, if interested, in the PipOrg-L Archives. Everything Charlie says = is true - at least about that!! It is a warm and wonderful place, and he is a big part of that.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler - writing from New Orleans. Home on Monday.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, March 04, 2004 12:48 PM Subject: Subject: Re: Re: Jumbotrons and such     > <reedstop@charter.net> said, > > =3D-> Amen, Monty!! If sermons and church music show as much > passion as you showed just now (like we do at where I play), > then maybe churches WOULD be fuller. <-=3D > > > And I'll add MY "AMEN" as well! > > I very cordially invite any of you to visit Holy Trinity > Evangelical Lutheran Church, 9300 Crenshaw Blvd., Inglewood, > California, Sunday services at 10:30 p.m. > > Those who wish to experience "happy clappy" first hand > instead of hiding behind their "contempt prior to > investigation" may be in for a very pleasant surprise. Or > not. But at least you will have experienced it for yourselves. > > Although, n.b., we don't have ALL the trappings -- no > jumbotron sorry to say. But we do have a lot of other good > stuff -- shrieky 1960s pseudo-baroque pipe organ (one more > example of the dark side of the orgelbewewewewewung); then > Hammond + Leslie, although it's a Concert Model Hammond so I > guess you could say it's "blended!" --- 7'6 Kawai grand --- > drums --- tambourines --- two Roland synths. > > AND we have a church full of YOUNG PEOPLE. Instead of a sea > of blue hair rinse, we have many kids, teens, young adults > and young families. Our youth choir has some 35-40 members. > In a parish where the membership is somewhere around 400 but > growing steadily. > > We also have a very warm, loving, welcoming congregation. > You will be made to feel very much at home regardless of > race, creed, color, gender, sexual persuasion, economic > level or political affiliation. Unlike some churches where > visitors are viewed with narrow-eyed suspicion at worst and > simply ignored at best. (A neighbor of mine went to a church > once where a crabby old lady came in and asked her to move, > because she was sitting in "her seat." She moved, all right > --- all the way out to the parking lot.) > > The church is full nearly every Sunday. There's nothing > dull, boring, or funeral-esque about our worship services. > Compare that with, what, 80-90% of the "traditional" > churches in Los Angeles where a smattering of people would > be considered good turn-out. > > See ya there .... or else quit sitting in your ivory towers > and judging [well, not even judging, but jumping straight to > "condemning"] what you haven't even experienced. > > > ~ > C > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Episcopal hymns From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 19:21:32 -0500   Dear List,   Is there not some value in the accumulated love of a tune that we might = find a little less than matching our sophisticated ideals. I think, as a musician, you can hardly not love Repton, but "Dear Lord and Father of Mankind" really cries out for "Rest," in most of our American = congregations. If part of what we are about is to serve, can we not take pleasure in providing that little comfort for our people? And then, does not this = apply also to "O Little Town of Bethlehem." Most of us love "Forest Green," organized by R. V. Williams, rather than the tune known by all around = these parts, and I have drawn a blank on its name, being today without a hymnal anywhere in sight at the moment here in New Orleans, perhaps almost for = the first time ever. We do, it has to be said, have other uses for Forest = Green and also Repton, so all is not lost. "Power to the people."   AND, I learned a lesson about this when I was a student playing in a small church, and, <mirabile dictu> was given the job of choosing all the hymns, unqualified as I was, by a lazy rector. When I saw "Hermann" for "Dear = Lord and Father of Mankind," I thought, I know that tune. It really is superior to "Rest," and the clued-in choir was prepared to lead, and lead they did. At the end of the service, I heard the very kind and good senior warden walking down the nave aisle whistling the tune "Rest." I really don't = think it was particularly conscious, nor any kind of gesture, but rather a subconscious response to having heard those words. I do believe there is a message there.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, March 04, 2004 1:07 PM Subject: Re: Episcopal hymns     > Um, let's see: > > Dear Lord & Father of Mankind - "Repton" rules supreme (among Anglicans > at least) in the UK; in the US until recently it was "Rest" by Frederick > C. Maker; "Hermann" in the Episcopal Hymnal 1940 never caught on, to my > knowledge > > Alleluia! Sing to Jesus - assorted tunes in the UK, including > Ton-y-Botel and Vision (a LOVELY tune in the English Hymnal); Hyfrydol > all the way in the US. > > Just As I Am - Saffron Walden in the UK; Woodworth in the US > > Nearer, My God, To Thee - Horbury in the UK; Bethany in the US > > Those are just a few that come to mind without doing a lot of research. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > Will Light wrote: > > > Now here's a new topic coming up! Over here in THE UK, the FAMILIAR = tune to > > both Anglicans and Methodists for "There's a Wideness in God's Mercy" = is not > > "Beecher" but "Cross of Jesus" by Stainer - one of the congregational hymns > > written as part of "The Crucifixion" I wonder how many standard hymns have > > different standard tunes on opposite sides of the pond? > > > > Will Light > > Coventry UK > > > > > > -----Original Message----- > > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf = Of > > quilisma@cox.net > > [BIG snip] > > > > I would NEVER choose St. Helena for "There's A Wideness in God's = Mercy" > > ... the Hampton setting is fine for a choir; the FAMILIAR tune to > > Methodists, Presbyterians AND Anglicans is "Beecher." > > > > > > Bud > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: PipeChat From: "Nina Robart" <ninarae@cyberport.net> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 18:16:25 -0700   I am a new subscriber. I have been playing organ in churches for several years =96 about 20, I think. I would like to teach classical and church = organ to others. I tried finding teaching resources on line yesterday, but did not find much (unlike piano teaching, for which there are many resources online). Can any of you suggest resources for organ teachers that are accessible online? Or, if not online, where? (I tried the AGO website, but while t= he website has many resources for the performing organist, I did not find mu= ch for the teacher.)   Thanks, Nina    
(back) Subject: Re: Another interesting apparatus .... Austin too ! From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 17:23:21 -0800   I think there ARE expression couplers on larger e-organs ... an incentive to BUY larger e-organs (chuckle).   I often wished for a "Great and Pedal Unenclosed" tab on SMALL two-manual e-organs with a single expression shoe, to allow the Swell reeds to express THROUGH the unenclosed Great, rather than everything coming and going at once.   Cheers,   Bud   Mattcinnj wrote:   > Hi All, > > The first pipe organ I ever practiced on was a large 4 manual Austin > built in 1929. It had the selectable sliders and I have always thought > them to be highly desirable. For one thing, this organ had 5 expression =   > pedals plus the crescendo. Talk about intimidating to someone just > starting out !! > > I'm surprised the E-org builders haven't used it where the PEDAL is > usually under expression and this would allow you to express it with > whatever manual division you are using to accompany a solo line ... > instead of the usual practice of having it express with the GREAT. > > Matt > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Search - Find what you=92re looking for faster. > <http://search.yahoo.com/?fr=3Dad-mailsig-home>      
(back) Subject: Monty's New Ruffati From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 19:20:16 -0600   Monty said: , but with a five manual console and about 225 stop controls, plus another 42 couplers, what ever I did was going to take up a huge amount of space.   Gee, Monty--life is tough, ain't it?! Wish I had a problem like that! = ;>)     Dennis Steckley & A Six-Pack of Cats    
(back) Subject: Re: console apparati and cool stops From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 20:39:42 EST   Ron, Dell, and all .............   As the official Austin lurker on this list, you are all kind of right. A Nitsua is indeed a string of medium intensity with a reverse taper i.e. = flare, kind of like a Bell Gambe in visual appearance but not in tonality. I = hope this helps.   Rocky Mountain Organ Co., Inc. William S (Bill) Hesterman, President   We proudly represent Austin Organs, Inc. in the western US.    
(back) Subject: Re: Illuminated stop controls From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 19:53:41 -0600   I'm told that G. Donald Harrison of Aeolian-Skinner, when he came across lighted drawknobs on large instruments, used to set the combinations to spell out obseen words in lights.   John Speller   Colin Mitchell wrote:      
(back) Subject: Re: Fan Trumpets are not en chamade From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2004 20:48:55 -0600   Will Light wrote:   >At my grandmother's home town (or rather village) of Usk in = Monmouthshire, >they have an organ in the parish church with some startling en chamade >pipework. It was originally built by Gray & Davison in London in 1860, at = a >cost of =A31,094, for Llandaff Cathedral. The scheme was devised by Sir >Frederick Gore Ouseley. It was rebuilt at Usk in 1890. I have a couple of >photos of this interesting organ, and I'll try and upload them to the >pictures area. The Great Trumpet 8 is en chamade, and I don't know if you >would describe it as a Fan Trumpet, but the pipes certainly emerge from = the >casework in a kind of fan shape! > >Will Light >Coventry UK > > The en chamade at Usk is amazing; quite the best I have ever heard. Gray & Davison were not keen on high pressures, and therefore used an en chamade to try to attempt to get the effect of a high pressure Tuba Mitrabilis. The Usk en chamade is of large scale, and produces a much richer sound than most chamades. The organ was originally in Llandaff Cathedral and in moving it the casework got somewhat rearranged, with the result that under the chamade is an oddly truncated quotation from the Benedicite: "O YE CATTLE, PRAISE YE THE LORD" emblazoned across the front of the organ. I believe the organ was originally designed by the Revd. Professor Sir Frederick Arthur Gore Ouseley, Bart., Mus. Doc.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: RE: Fast and Loud Lent Music From: "Shaun Brown" <S.D.Brown@exeter.ac.uk> Date: Sat, 6 Mar 2004 03:18:23 -0000   Why on Earth do you want fast and loud music in lent. What's wrong with the vast arrays of quiet, reflective music that the rest of the world uses!