PipeChat Digest #4368 - Saturday, March 13, 2004
 
Organ use during Easter Triduum - Thanks
  by <RVScara@aol.com>
[VERY LONG] A certain charm or two in the handcuffs of life
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Organ use during Easter Triduum
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: 32' Additions
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Glorias and Easter Triduum
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: 32' Additions
  by <mewzishn@optonline.net>
Re: 32' Additions
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: 32' Additions
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
RE: 32' Additions
  by "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net>
SLIGHTLY off-topic: Gloria in excelsis on Maundy Thursday
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: 32' Additions
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: Organ use during Easter Triduum
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: SLIGHTLY off-topic: Gloria in excelsis on Maundy Thursday
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Organ use during Easter Triduum - Thanks From: <RVScara@aol.com> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 18:50:55 EST   To Bud, et al: Thank you for the information, especially that material from CanticaNOVA = .. You are the best!   Bob Scara, TO (Toaster Operator) St Paul RC Burlington, NJ    
(back) Subject: [VERY LONG] A certain charm or two in the handcuffs of life From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 18:00:00 -0600   A certain charm or two in the handcuffs of life     The last two weeks have been miserably busy, what with more time in court or teaching than in the office. Everything is blooming here, and the allergy season is in full swing, with sinus infections, burning eyes and the gamut. Last week consisted of three court days and some nasty hearings where the attorneys hissed and spit and did everything but meet in a dark alleyway at ten paces (make that three, since lawyers can=92t count to ten). The last hearing was the worst; I was fighting the state department of child welfare over its violation of its own regulations affecting the adoption of a 2-year old child. At the end of the arguments the judge basically said (translating into the vernacular) that I could win this argument if I could only pull a rabbit out of the hat (i.e., find something that faintly resembles and smells like legal authority or precedent that manipulates or extends the fairly straightforward language of the statute that denies the judge jurisdiction to make the decision I needed). =20   So this week I=92ve been in a plethora of emergency hearings, spent two days of teaching, delegated a staff meeting to someone else to suffer through, fought the sinus headaches and smarting eyes, and got ready for one day of next week=92s court (I just remembered I have to prep a horrible witness for a trial next week!). In between constant telephone calls I have tried to get out a memorandum of law by the court=92s deadline on the above-described case. Most of the time I have been the only one in the office, so it=92s hard to concentrate with the = additional tasks of answering my own phone, answering questions of people running in and out, charming a copy machine repairman into giving vitamins to a machine that sleeps more on the job than I do, and doing my own secretarial stuff too (just where the hell is the staff, my 2003 statutes and my Lexis password? I implore you to pry the letter opener from my grip - otherwise I might hurt myself, since there is no one else around manning the office).   Sorry =96 I was ranting for a minute there. I feel better now. Anyway, it was so wonderful to walk out naked and screaming and leave it all to drive to Fairhope, Alabama, just below Mobile. I picked up one of my faithful organic friends in Crestview, and if not for stopping for directions because we mistakenly thought we missed our turn, we would have made the 2 =BD hour drive in an hour and a half. David, don=92t = ask =96 I don=92t know how I did that, but it=92s true.   Nestled in the pleasant burg of Fairhope is St. James Episcopal Church, a beautifully gleaming white building on a hill. To walk inside is to instantly shed the stressors of the outside world. The architectural detailing of the building=92s interior unifies themes of the cross, = gothic arches, latticework, the vertical linearity (boy, there=92s a new word!) of wainscoting throughout, and clean, gleaming white walls. There is no stained glass to compete with this elaborate pristine austerity =96 the pointed gothic windows are clear, as are the flanking dormers overlooking the high altar. In fact, the only real distraction is the air conditioning system, which sounds like rain outside on the roof.   Helen Van Abbema Rogers presides here as Director of Music Ministries. She is fortunate to have, and indeed was instrumental in obtaining and refurbishing, two pipe organs. One resides in the compact and lovely chapel =96 a Hook and Hastings (II/14, 1896, moved and restored circa = 1994 by Mann & Trupiano) saved from the former church building and originally built for and housed in a convent in Mobile. If you will recall I talked about this organ (in fact, both organs) three or four years ago when the Pensacola AGO Chapter joined the Mobile Chapter in an organ crawl in Mobile and surrounding area. This organ is in a gallery accessible by a steep and scary ladder, and the organist bench butts against the railing which is shorter than the bench. When one realizes that there is nothing between one=92s bending back and the sheer drop to the floor, it becomes hard to concentrate on playing the organ.   But the reason Leon and I were here tonight was to hear the main organ in the church =96 originally a Schlicker from First Plymouth Congregational Church in Lincoln, Nebraska (III/65, 1968, moved and installed circa 1997 by Mann & Trupiano), also installed in a roomy back balcony. David Briggs was to play, but because of his heart attack Mary Preston was scheduled instead. I had never heard her, so we decided to brave the drive on a Friday night.   The church provided us with a fascinating bi-fold brochure giving a brief history and stop list of the two organs, as well as a program. I had not been here in at least two years, so was pleasantly surprised to view the fa=E7ade completed July 2003, replete with columns, = coordinating lattice work and an angel. To enhance our watching the performer, two television monitors were installed in the nave. =20   This organ has always been an aggressive bugger, reminding me somewhat of the Klais at St. Peter=92s Lutheran in Manhattan. I had hoped that = the fa=E7ade and swell shutters would tame the beast, but it still roared = =96 even at pianissimo, it is not soft. However, the tone largely remains clear =96 we enjoyed good voicing even when the ears were ringing.   The program:   Symphony III =96 Marcia =96 Widor Piece Heroique =96 Franck Chorale Prelude and Trio on =93Herr Jesu Christ, dich zu uns wend=94, = BWV 709 and 655 =96 Bach Phantasie uber den Choral =93Hallelujah! Gott zu loben, bleibe meine Seelenfreud!=94 =96Reger   Intermission   Variations on =93America=94 =96 Ives Evensong =96 John La Montaine (born 1920) Pieces de Fantaisie: Feux follets =96 Vierne Sonata Eroica =96 Jongen   Encore =96 Hornpipe by Noel Rawsthorne   I must tell you that my first experience of Mary Preston left me mightily impressed. She was a woman after my own heart =96 she left nothing to chance. Every note was sure; there was no sloppiness, no faltering, no uncomfortable pauses. There was plenty of drama. The Widor gave me a strange sensation: for the first time I wanted to face the organ, because it actually made a difference in what my ears heard. The Franck was as I had never heard it before =96 the stops were not exactly what one is used to, but it was pleasing and interesting. The inner voices were very apparent. The reeds used were reedy without being buzzy.   Preston had the congregation sing No. 310 in the 1982 Hymnal, a two-stanza setting of the Bach chorale theme. The trio was just glorious, lovely and crisp, and I noticed that she is of the genre of organists that makes performance look easy. The Reger made our heads spin and our ears ring. I appreciated the performer=92s level of = artistry without sacrificing good solid musical technique =96 there was an excellent balance of the two.   I must make confession here =96 I have never liked Ives=92 Variations. = I don=92t know why. But Preston introduced the piece by asking the crowd = to imagine a big parade in Texas, with several high school bands of varying abilities and renditions of =93America=94 ready to play. Some bands = were good, some not so good, some played a jazzy style, some used major keys and others minor, and some couldn=92t decide which to use. And all = these bands got the directions wrong and marched off, to end up together at the bandstand in the end. Then she proceeded to play the piece in a most inventive fashion. I had never studied the score, but for the first time actually heard motifs I had not paid attention to before tonight.   I remarked to Rick this week that the older I got the angrier and more tyrannical, and he readily agreed, being the remarkable and doting husband that he is. However, my tolerance for freight train music increases with age, and the La Montaine was not all bad, the 32=92 added at the end for good measure.   As much as I have never liked the =93Variations on =91America=92=94, I = have always liked =93Feux follets=94. I thought this performance was as = good a one as I have ever heard =96 the fireflies were flawless and beautiful. = I did not make notes of the registration here, only that the sounds were interesting. In fact, I didn=92t have the stoplist in hand until after the recital, so I couldn=92t exactly figure out what she was doing, but = it was good nonetheless.   The Jongen showcased the organ at its best. Every color, buzz, bubble and bauble was exploited. And of course the encore was cute. All I lacked was a good sword, because I was otherwise motivated to fight demons.   Surely somewhere in my collection of organ CDs is at least one of her, but I don=92t remember ever hearing her before. I trashed my mental = list of favorite organ performers, resolving to start from scratch. I=92m a convert.   Leon and I found a Semolina=92s and had a late supper, crowing over our good fortune. Our favorite pasta place in Pensacola was shut down, so we were quite stuffed as we rolled our way home.   I=92m typing this on the laptop and can=92t (i.e., am too sleepy and = lazy to) check the internet to see if the stoplists are still available on the Pensacola AGO website. I assume they are, if anyone is interested.   Now, if I can just seduce someone to ride with me to Little Rock next month to hear Ken Cowan, with stops and possible organic excursions in Jackson, Mississippi, and Monroe, Louisiana . . . .=20   Thanks for reading.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Organ use during Easter Triduum From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 16:06:24 -0800 (PST)   Hello,     I had always regarded the non-use of one's organ during Lent to be a useful bit of abstinence, but I didn't know that it carried the official seal of approval.   Those Catholics think of everything!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - More reliable, more storage, less spam http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: 32' Additions From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 16:08:24 -0800 (PST)   hi Noel! This is wonderful stuff. We got a letter at my church this week, that the trustees of a foundation = in Chicago is going to consider giving us a grant for invigorating our = music program here. Im thank ful to God that Im doing things after only a = month in the position. A major part of that would be a new organ of pipe/digital combo by Cornell = Zimmer or Rodgers/Ruffatti. As a matter of fact, im listening to Richard = Morris right at this moment play the BelAir Pres organ of = Rodgers/Cassavant. We can keep some of the current organ pipes, but most = of the pipe work is just old and worn out. The people are excited,and im = happy too. I woudl want to take some of those samples from the MX 200 and = put them in the new organs stoplist. The great, swell and pedal would be = as much pipe work as possible in the front of the church, and a solo = horizontal trumpet. But with the digital voices, I could add a few floater = divisions and a choir. I REALLY love celestes, so need some things for my = lush pieces. Anyway Thanks for the intro to the MX 200     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60649 http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - More reliable, more storage, less spam  
(back) Subject: Glorias and Easter Triduum From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 18:16:45 -0600   As relating to the excerpts below, does that imply that the Gloria IS sung on Holy Thursday?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com (M.A., stupid questions)   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of quilisma@cox.net     Here's the article that quotes directly from the most recent Ceremoniale   (Bishop's book of ceremonial) (1989), the LAST OFFICIAL WORD on the subject:   CNP Feedback - Organ Music during Lent? by Gary D. Penkala       On the issue of organ music from Gloria to Gloria (Holy Thursday to Easter Vigil), the Ceremonial of Bishops says,   *********************************************************************   "During the same period [Gloria-Gloria], the organ and other musical instruments may be used only to sustain the singing."   *********************************************************************   This document does no more than officially extend the rules for Lent (which has ended prior to the Holy Thursday Mass) through the Triduum. This would be the minimum expectation (using organ only for accompaniment). If a parish wanted to go beyond this (the traditional position, and one I would absolutely promote) and turn the organ off completely from Gloria to Gloria, there is nothing in any document that prohibits this. The rubrics only tell us what the limits of organ use are, not that we must always proceed to those limits.     bgsx wrote:   > > http://www.seattlearch.org/WorshipAndSacraments/Liturgy/lenteaster.htm > > "Lent and Easter > A Pastoral Guide" > > "Liturgical Music. The use of musical instruments is allowed only to > support the singing (Ceremonial of Bishops, no. 252). The exceptions to > this rule are on the fourth Sunday of Lent (Laetare Sunday), and on > solemnities and feasts (March 19 and 25). The Gloria is not sung or > recited during Lent until Holy Thursday, except for the solemnities and > feasts (March 19 and 25). The Alleluia is not used until the Easter > Vigil. Lent might also be highlighted by greater use of silence during   > the liturgy."        
(back) Subject: Re: 32' Additions From: <mewzishn@optonline.net> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 19:26:12 -0500   How does one 'wear out' a pipe? What *are* you using them for, dear?   Kenneth L. Sybesma Choirmaster and Organist Church of the Advent, Westbury NY Temple Organist & Director of Children's Music Temple Or Elohim, Jericho NY   On 13 Mar 2004, at 7.08 PM, T.Desiree' Hines wrote:   > most of the pipe work is just old and worn out    
(back) Subject: Re: 32' Additions From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 18:26:59 -0600   At 4:08 PM -0800 03/13/04, T.Desiree' Hines wrote: > We can keep some of the current organ pipes, but most of the pipe >work is just old and worn out.   Pipe work doesn't get old and worn out. It can be old and sometimes much better than what is currently available today. The action/console/etc. can get worn out but not the pipes. Think about some of the old, old, old European organs and their pipes or even some of the late 1800's Hooks and other builders of that era.   David  
(back) Subject: Re: 32' Additions From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 16:45:57 -0800 (PST)   Well guys, this, I know. as the pipes age, they get better, and last = forever. But, the organ in the church I am at, has pipes that have been altered, = painted, etc. Some have slightly started to sag, and the organ is crunched = into a poorly designed chamber. And im finding out that its a 57 sause = organ, mostly part of the old Weickhart at Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago. = The pipe work has not been treated with care like it should have been. = Thats what I mean. THATS why im tryign to get things going for the better = ;) (wink)         From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60649 http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - More reliable, more storage, less spam  
(back) Subject: RE: 32' Additions From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 18:50:30 -0600   > We can keep some of the current organ pipes, but most of the pipe > >work is just old and worn out. > > Pipe work doesn't get old and worn out. It can be old and sometimes > much better than what is currently available today.   Unless they decide that they're German zinc in the mid 1980's and decide = to collapse upon themselves.   However, I know of a couple of organs here in St. Louis with pipework just over 100 years old.   Jeff    
(back) Subject: SLIGHTLY off-topic: Gloria in excelsis on Maundy Thursday From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 16:59:45 -0800   There has ALWAYS been a Gloria in excelsis on Maundy Thursday, AFAIK, both for the Bishop's Chrism Mass in the morning and the Mass of the Lord's Supper in the evening.   HOWEVER, the 1928 American Episcopal Book of Common Prayer DID offer two options as a sop to the evangelical element ... one could either read part of the Passion (with purple vestments and no Gloria), or the Gospel of the Foot-Washing (with white vestments and Gloria). I never saw the former done, even in broad to fairly low churches ... it was always a white Mass with Gloria.   In the new American Book of Common Prayer, RED vestments are "recommended" from Palm Sunday THROUGH Good Friday, inclusive, and the Gloria is sung on Maundy Thursday. One presumes by that they mean the old Sarum DARK red for Passiontide, rather than the crimson of Pentecost or Martyrs.   Oddly enough, the Gloria PATRI *wasn't* sung in the Introit, since Maundy Thursday was reckoned to be part of Passiontide in the old books. The "new" Graduale Romanum (1975) has restored the Gloria Patri to all the Masses of "old" Passiontide, from Lent V (old Passion Sunday) right straight through Maundy Thursday.   I can follow that reasoning ... the Trinity is still the Trinity, even in the depths of Holy Week ... just as the Orthodox sing "alleluia", even on Good Friday (!) ... making anamnesis of the events of Holy Week isn't the same as re-enactment or re-creation; the events took place once for all time in history. Christ IS risen and reigning in glory.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: 32' Additions From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 19:08:21 -0600   OK, you asked privately about Tougaloo, and I told you to look at = http://redmanpipeorgans.com and scroll down from the Tougaloo picture = to see how it looked before restoration. You see, those pipes had been = painted over many times, and some were damaged and sagging. Good pipes = can be repaired!!! Even with horrible damage, they can be rebuilt. = Look at what has happened with the Tannenberg at Winston Salem for = instance. Don't give up on the old organ. I am sure that there is much = there that is useable. Roy Redman ----- Original Message -----=20 From: T.Desiree' Hines=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Saturday, March 13, 2004 6:45 PM Subject: Re: 32' Additions     Well guys, this, I know. as the pipes age, they get better, and last = forever.=20 But, the organ in the church I am at, has pipes that have been = altered, painted, etc. Some have slightly started to sag, and the organ = is crunched into a poorly designed chamber. And im finding out that its = a 57 sause organ, mostly part of the old Weickhart at Holy Name = Cathedral in Chicago. The pipe work has not been treated with care like = it should have been. Thats what I mean. THATS why im tryign to get = things going for the better ;) (wink)         From Desiree'=20 T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60649 http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - More reliable, more storage, less spam    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ use during Easter Triduum From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 20:05:08 EST   Colin, et al.,   When I worked for the Roman Church, we did not do organ voluntaries during =   Holy Week, though did do Preludes in Lent (but not Postludes). Hymns and = Psalms were accompanied during the Triduum, as well as Choir Voluntaries as = necesary, which I believe is well within the confines of the GIRM as interpreted by American RC Bishops.   At St. John's, Boston, we use the Cowley customary (though we are no = longer a Cowley Mission) which DOES allow for Preludes (but not Postludes) during Lent; Titcomb's voluminous output of Lenten Plainchant-based organ works = bears out this custom, at least as far as St. John's Bowdoin St. is concerned. One = of his students and his successor at St. John's has confirmed that Preludes = were in fact played before the Introit during Lent (until Passion Sunday) at = St. John's during the Cowley Mission period from at least 1910 until (and = after) 1986. Also, the customary allows for the singing of the Gloria Patri in = the Plainsong Introit on SUNDAYS ONLY (but not weekdays, and not during Holy = Week Masses/Offices between Passion Sunday and the Easter Vigil). The Gloria in = Excelsis is not sung until the Vigil.   During the Triduum, organ accompanies Hymns only; all psalmody is = plainsong only (as is usual at St. John's, though Anglican Chant is sometimes used = in Ordinary Time during the Summer) and all Anthems/Propers are Plainsong or unaccompanied Polyphony. The Ordinary of the Mass is always plainsong or = Polyphony in Lent--up to the Great Vigil. The Exception is no organ at all on Good Friday/Mass of the Presanctified or the daily Mass on Holy Saturday. Black = vestments are worn on Good Friday by Celebrant, Deacon and Subdeacon (this MAY be a Sarum Rite /SSJE "wierdness", as Red is modern Anglican/RC practice, I = believe). According to this customary, the organ does not play after Holy Thursday = until the Gloria at the Great Vigil of Easter.   While this is an EXTREMELY rarified customary, both in England and the = United States, it seems rather sensible.   Bill H. Church of St. John the Evangelist (Episcopal/Anglican), Bowdoin St., = Boston MA.                
(back) Subject: Re: SLIGHTLY off-topic: Gloria in excelsis on Maundy Thursday From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 20:13:21 EST   Bud,   I'll have to go back to my Cowley Customary and look and see if the Gloria = in Excelsis is used on Maundy Thursday. It might well be, though the = Customary was written for the Anglican Missal and not the BCP. Any idea where the = Black vestment custom came in? Bill H. SJE, Boston.