PipeChat Digest #4370 - Sunday, March 14, 2004
 
Re: 32' Additions
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: old pipes
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Organ use during Easter Triduum
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: 32' Additions
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: old pipes
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Organ use during Easter Triduum
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: 32' Additions
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Disney Hall Organ
  by "John Jarvis" <JLJarvis@comcast.net>
Wedding Choral Music Recommendations?
  by "John Jarvis" <JLJarvis@comcast.net>
Re: Re: Organ use during Easter Triduum
  by <reedstop@charter.net>
Re: Disney Hall Organ
  by <Rachmaninoff45@aol.com>
leathered lips
  by "black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Wedding Processionals
  by <MMccal7284@aol.com>
Re: old pipes
  by <mewzishn@optonline.net>
Re: Glorias and Easter Triduum
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: wearing out old pipes
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: leathered lips
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Wedding Processionals
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
repertoire question
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Wedding Processionals
  by "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org>
Re: leathered lips
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
RE: Wedding Processionals
  by "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net>
RE: wearing out old pipes
  by "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net>
RE: Wedding Processionals
  by "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net>
Re: repertoire question
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Wedding Processionals
  by "DVR" <DVRmusician@webtv.net>
Re: leathered lips
  by <Seedlac@aol.com>
Re: rotting pipes?
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: leathered lips
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: repertoire question
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Re: Wedding Processionals
  by "Milo R. Shepherd" <mrstwin2@cox.net>
Band of Brothers theme on the Organ
  by "Milo R. Shepherd" <mrstwin2@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: 32' Additions From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 10:35:08 +0000 (GMT)   The 32' Contre Basse and 32' Contre Bombarde on the Ahlborn Galanti sitting to my left as I type this (they do not look as spectacular as the pipes in Disneyland) seem to work quite effectively in Stereo. I would challenge anyone to tell the difference between the sound of the Rodgers, the Ahlborn, and even the real thing at this pitch! Surely here it depends on the speakers and amplifiers. The weakness of electronic organs still seems to lie with the full organ chorus sound - maybe it was elsewhere, but Charlie Lester summed it up in his description of the new electronic gizmo in a church in (I think) Wall Street - the Church of the Seventh Day Interest rates, perhaps? Solo stops, particularly the Corno di Bassetto and Pedal Klarine 4' are beautiful - as are the celestes and the flute sounds. But they miss out on the Principals. John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : American Politics The Burning Bush Formula 1     ___________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends today! Download Messenger Now http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html  
(back) Subject: Re: old pipes From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 10:53:22 +0000 (GMT)   The state of old pipes also depends to some extent on the physical conditions in which they are situated. A very humid atmosphere can result in wood rotting, mould appearing and the mouths becoming soggy. Metal can also be affected by damp - it gets rusty - and wood by very dry conditions. The glue can dry and the wood split. Sometimes this is repairable, sometimes it gas gone beyond the point of no return. John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : American Politics The Burning Bush Gay "marriage" Hubble benefits     ___________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends today! Download Messenger Now http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ use during Easter Triduum From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 20:26:00 +0800   Heck, life in the organ loft's complicated enough. We use the organ = during the whole church year. But then we do not get instructions from = any superior councils or officals as to what we must use as music in any = season of the year. The organist decides what he (or she) will play. The = clergy pick the hymns, we play them. I like it that way! Bob Elms. ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Jeff White=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Sunday, March 14, 2004 12:10 PM Subject: RE: Organ use during Easter Triduum  
(back) Subject: Re: 32' Additions From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 06:34:21 -0600   The organ I learnt to play on in England has some pipes that are 300 years old. Well, 296. And the Sion organ in Switzerland has pipes that are 700+. Repairing dropped languids, taking out dents, stripping off paint, etc., is a relatively easy job for a skilled pipemaker if the pipes were well-made to start with. Who was the original builder? Because of the materials that were available then and now, especially with the zinc basses and wooden pipes, old pipes can often be better than new ones.   John Speller   Jeff White wrote:   >> We can keep some of the current organ pipes, but most of the pipe >> >> >>>work is just old and worn out. >>> >>> >>Pipe work doesn't get old and worn out. It can be old and sometimes >>much better than what is currently available today. >> >> > >Unless they decide that they're German zinc in the mid 1980's and decide = to >collapse upon themselves. > >However, I know of a couple of organs here in St. Louis with pipework = just >over 100 years old. > >        
(back) Subject: Re: old pipes From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 06:47:15 -0600   Even if the leather was not still good, it is less than a morning's work to replace it. gary black wrote:   > List, I have 98 year old Estey pipes and the leather on the mouths of > the 8' diapason are still good as is the other pipe work. I think I > shall keep them. Gary          
(back) Subject: Re: Organ use during Easter Triduum From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 06:52:05 -0600   If you don't actually want to stop using the organ during Lent, a useful compromise is to "tone it down" a bit. Try giving the mixtures and bright reeds a rest, resulting in a more somber registration. I have come across many organists who did this.   John speller   bobelms wrote:   > Heck, life in the organ loft's complicated enough. We use the organ > during the whole church year. But then we do not get instructions from > any superior councils or officals as to what we must use as music in > any season of the year. The organist decides what he (or she) will > play. The clergy pick the hymns, we play them. I like it that way! > Bob Elms. >        
(back) Subject: Re: 32' Additions From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 09:56:00 -0500   "seem to work quite effectively in Stereo. I would challenge anyone to tell the difference between the sound of the Rodgers, the Ahlborn, and even the real thing at this pitch!"   At this I have to say that you are absolutely right, John, it does also depend upon the quality of the audio system and placement. This does explain the success of many digital 32's, since the placement of the tone source is not limited by building design...instead of putting them where they may fit and possibly not produce, they can be positioned where they work.   With the stereo 32' it is necessary to figure the waveshape and place the cabinets appropriate distances apart. They will work if not placed so, but so will a 32' stuck in a corner, blocked by reservoirs,case structure, choir stalls and everything else.   This, friends, is not an argument for the use of digital, but rather dealing with the harsh reality of building design.   Conversely I was given the rare privilege Friday to truck my cello in and play some Vivaldi to test the acoustics of a new chapel designed by an internationally famous architect whose only other liturgical building was an outdoor chapel...and the building is fantastic. It's a thrill to have been the first person to play in the room.   You see, there can be joy in being an "electronic organ salesperson".     -- noel jones, aago noeljones@frogmusic.com ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ moderator, rodgers organ users group frog music press www.frogmusic.com 423 887-7594 athens, tn, usa      
(back) Subject: Disney Hall Organ From: "John Jarvis" <JLJarvis@comcast.net> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 07:50:34 -0800   An article in this morning's Newspaper that is attributed to the = Washington Post described a tour of the new Disney Concert Hall. When local children were asked what the organ looked like they got responses of Fettuccini, Yellow Pepper Strips and French Fries. I bet those kids will always remember that place with the organ that looked like French Fries! I = wonder if they will ever "SuperSize" those Fries?   JJ      
(back) Subject: Wedding Choral Music Recommendations? From: "John Jarvis" <JLJarvis@comcast.net> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 07:58:22 -0800   I need some collected advice from those of you who play in more = liturgical churches than I. I have played for 100's of weddings over the past 30 = years but never one where there was a choir. I am not even sure what songs I would have a choir sing. I am the Choral Director at a local High = School with about 120 kids in the program. I am beginning to do some initial planning for next school year which must include several fund raisers. A H.S. Choral Director colleague hosted a mock wedding as a fund raiser = and made tons of money. So, I would like to host a "Wedding" in the school theater with a cake reception and DJ in the Student Union building. I = will have an 80 voice concert choir for the "wedding" and plan on using my auditioned select Chamber Singers as the Groomsmen and Bridesmaids as = they all have matching tuxes and gowns. I want some fun songs before the = wedding such as "Going to Chapel" and etc.   Can you recommend some more serious music for the pretend ceremony? You input is greatly appreciated and is probably best sent to me = directly. John Jarvis JLJarvis@comcast.net        
(back) Subject: Re: Re: Organ use during Easter Triduum From: <reedstop@charter.net> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 16:52:15 +0000   John, I can't disagree with you on this, but I still feel that, even = during Lent, the hymn should suggest the registration. Certainly Mixtures = should not be used on "Stricken, Smitten, and Afflicted", but a more = praise-type hymn (such as those found in the "Beginning of Worship" = section of the hymnals) still should call for it. Even during Lent, we = should (IMHO) treat each Sunday as a "little Easter". That's why I still = play postludes (even though Lenten, I had the organ wide open this = morning), but I don't do them on Wednesday night midweek services, and = won't for Holy Week.   It's up to us to "set the mood", as it were, so definitely cutting back is = appropriate. I did play the Sanctus the "regular" way (full to mix + 16' = reed in pedal) this morning. But I have completely cut out the use of the = Zimbelstern during this season. :)   Jeff     > If you don't actually want to stop using the organ during Lent, a useful =   > compromise is to "tone it down" a bit. Try giving the mixtures and > bright reeds a rest, resulting in a more somber registration. I have > come across many organists who did this.      
(back) Subject: Re: Disney Hall Organ From: <Rachmaninoff45@aol.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 12:12:58 EST   Those French Fries are already "supersized". (LOL)     In a message dated 3/14/2004 9:52:02 AM Central Standard Time,=20 JLJarvis@comcast.net writes: An article in this morning=E2=80=99s Newspaper that is attributed to the Was= hington=20 Post described a tour of the new Disney Concert Hall. When local children w= ere=20 asked what the organ looked like they got responses of Fettuccini, Yellow=20 Pepper Strips and French Fries. I bet those kids will always remember that=20= place=20 with the organ that looked like French Fries! I wonder if they will ever=20= =E2=80=9C SuperSize=E2=80=9D those Fries? JJ   Best Regards, Gregory Hinson    
(back) Subject: leathered lips From: "black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 11:32:45 -0600   List, I have a question. Why would an organ building firm such as Estey, = put leather on mouths of the 8' diapason? What is the advantage of = doing that? It doesn't seem to be the practice any longer. Gary  
(back) Subject: Wedding Processionals From: <MMccal7284@aol.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 12:48:53 EST   Hi, fellow organists ~ Need some suggestions for wedding processionals, please. THE Widor is, = of course, the usual choice for recessionals but would like to find something =   "fresh" for processionals. Thanks in advance! MaryLee  
(back) Subject: Re: old pipes From: <mewzishn@optonline.net> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 13:34:20 -0500   "Wearing out" implies something that happens from ordinary use. Buildings do not wear out if flooded or burned. Organ pipes do not wear out if melted from intense heat or rotted from extremes of humidity, or from infestation of insects. Now, organ pedalboards and keyboards, and contacts, and knobs, etc., well may wear out from use.   Kenneth L. Sybesma Choirmaster and Organist Church of the Advent, Westbury NY Temple Organist & Director of Children's Music Temple Or Elohim, Jericho NY   On 14 Mar 2004, at 5.53 AM, John Foss wrote:   > The state of old pipes also depends to some extent on > the physical conditions in which they are situated.    
(back) Subject: Re: Glorias and Easter Triduum From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 13:12:55 -0600   The Gloria is sung on Holy Thursday while the church bells are rung for the last time until the Easter vigil. This means that my choir now has to practice the Gloria to get ready for Holy Thursday, since we haven't sung it in church for several weeks.   Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: 'PipeChat' <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sat, 13 Mar 2004 18:16:45 -0600 Subject: Glorias and Easter Triduum   > As relating to the excerpts below, does that imply that the Gloria IS > sung on Holy Thursday? > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > (M.A., stupid questions) > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > quilisma@cox.net > > > Here's the article that quotes directly from the most recent > Ceremoniale > > (Bishop's book of ceremonial) (1989), the LAST OFFICIAL WORD on the > subject: > > CNP Feedback - Organ Music during Lent? > by Gary D. Penkala > > > > On the issue of organ music from Gloria to Gloria (Holy Thursday to > Easter Vigil), the Ceremonial of Bishops says, > > ********************************************************************* > > "During the same period [Gloria-Gloria], the organ and other musical > instruments may be used only to sustain the singing." > > ********************************************************************* > > This document does no more than officially extend the rules for Lent > (which has ended prior to the Holy Thursday Mass) through the Triduum. > This would be the minimum expectation (using organ only for > accompaniment). If a parish wanted to go beyond this (the traditional > position, and one I would absolutely promote) and turn the organ off > completely from Gloria to Gloria, there is nothing in any document that > prohibits this. The rubrics only tell us what the limits of organ use > are, not that we must always proceed to those limits. > > > bgsx wrote: > > > > > > http://www.seattlearch.org/WorshipAndSacraments/Liturgy/lenteaster.htm > > > > "Lent and Easter > > A Pastoral Guide" > > > > "Liturgical Music. The use of musical instruments is allowed only to > > support the singing (Ceremonial of Bishops, no. 252). The exceptions > to > > this rule are on the fourth Sunday of Lent (Laetare Sunday), and on > > solemnities and feasts (March 19 and 25). The Gloria is not sung or > > recited during Lent until Holy Thursday, except for the solemnities > and > > feasts (March 19 and 25). The Alleluia is not used until the Easter > > Vigil. Lent might also be highlighted by greater use of silence > during > > > the liturgy." > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: wearing out old pipes From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 12:00:45 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Not strictly true!   Diaphonic valves wear, as do the starter motors on big reeds. Reed tongues also lose curvature through use and age.   That apart, your point is correct, except to say that, given a couple of million years, there would be wind erosion of pipes!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- mewzishn@optonline.net wrote: > "Wearing out" implies something that happens from > ordinary use.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - More reliable, more storage, less spam http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: leathered lips From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 12:11:23 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Leathering the top lips of pipes is a useful, if rather unfashionable way, of reducing the generation of "edge tone" in organ pipes, which in a poor acoustic, can be heard as "fizz" and random harmonics, esepcially with the use of high pressure wind.   Arthur Harrison and John Compton used leathered lips quite often, but generally speaking, outside the cinemas, such leathering was quite rare in the UK due to the lower wind pressures we tend to emply.   America has always been the home of leathered lips and fuller organ tone; possibly as a result of the acoustics in many American churches and other rooms.   It's horses for courses of course, and there have been very good reasons why leathering has been used artistically over the years.   Nowadays, the practice is regarded as somehow decadent, as a result of the baroque influence and the lowering of wind pressures, but I would personally prefer voicing artistry to the dictates of fashion, and if that means leathering in the right circumstances, then so be it.   Many baroque reeds had leathered shallots as a means of smoothing out the sound. I wonder if they were decried in their day?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- black <gblack@ocslink.com> wrote: > List, I have a question. Why would an organ building > firm such as Estey, put leather on mouths of the 8' > diapason?   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - More reliable, more storage, less spam http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Processionals From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 16:18:49 EST   When Felix played for our wedding, the Processional was Prelude and Fugue (St. Anne) in Eb Major by Bach. Then the Congregation sang "O God Our = Help in Ages Past." For the Recessional he played Karg Elert's "Now Thank We All = Our God." Eyrline    
(back) Subject: repertoire question From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 16:46:05 -0500   In the category of baroque preludes, toccatas, fantasias, and fugues in = the German tradition, what composers do you find to be of interest beside = Bach, Boehm, Bruhns, Buxtehude, Krebs, Lubeck, Pachelbel, and Walther?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Processionals From: "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 16:53:30 -0500   Mendelssohn Second Sonata...the Allegro section makes a GREAT March!                 ---------- Original Message ---------------------------------- From: MMccal7284@aol.com Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 12:48:53 EST   >Hi, fellow organists ~ > Need some suggestions for wedding processionals, please. THE Widor = is, of >course, the usual choice for recessionals but would like to find = something >"fresh" for processionals. Thanks in advance! > MaryLee >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >  
(back) Subject: Re: leathered lips From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 16:43:55 -0600   Putting leather on the lips of a pipe enables enormous power to be got out of the pipe without it losing brightness. Leathered lips are generally only used on a very large Open Diapason (or on a Stentor Diapason, Stentorphone or Diapason Phonon -- all of which are pretty much the same thing). Occasionally one might also find a 4' Stentor Octave as well. One also might use it on a very loud solo flute, such as a Flauto Mirabilis.   On the 5/155 that we at Quimby Pipe Organs are currently installing in First Baptist Church, Jackson, MS, the Fanfare division Stentorphone, Flauto Mirabilis and Stentor Octave -- all on 15" wind -- have leathered lips.   John Speller   black wrote:   > List, I have a question. Why would an organ building firm such as > Estey, put leather on mouths of the 8' diapason? What is the > advantage of doing that? It doesn't seem to be the practice any > longer. Gary          
(back) Subject: RE: Wedding Processionals From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 16:55:30 -0600   Try "A Festive Intrada" by Walter Pelz, published by (I think) Concordia Publishing House. Quite fun to play, too!   The Trumpet Voluntary by Purcell (or Clarke) is always a favorite, too.   Jeff   > Need some suggestions for wedding processionals, please.    
(back) Subject: RE: wearing out old pipes From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 16:57:01 -0600   > Hello, > Not strictly true! > Diaphonic valves wear, as do the starter motors on big > reeds. Reed tongues also lose curvature through use > and age.   Would it be a more fair statement to say that "standard flue pipes" tend = to not wear out? Wood, of course, can rot or whatever, although that = shouldn't happen if treated properly. Metal flue pipes, then? :)   Just asking...not trying to be a smart-alek.   Jeff    
(back) Subject: RE: Wedding Processionals From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 16:57:52 -0600   L ee, that's a heck of a processional piece! Did he play the whole thing, or just part of it? Just how long was this procession??   Jeff   When Felix played for our wedding, the Processional was Prelude and = Fugue (St. Anne) in Eb Major by Bach. Then the Congregation sang "O God Our = Help in Ages Past." For the Recessional he played Karg Elert's "Now Thank We = All Our God." Eyrline    
(back) Subject: Re: repertoire question From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 16:51:21 -0600   Christian Ritter (~1645-~1717), Franz Tunder (1614-1667), Heinrich Scheidemann (~1595-1663)   John Speller   Randolph Runyon wrote:   >In the category of baroque preludes, toccatas, fantasias, and fugues in = the >German tradition, what composers do you find to be of interest beside = Bach, >Boehm, Bruhns, Buxtehude, Krebs, Lubeck, Pachelbel, and Walther? > > >        
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Processionals From: "DVR" <DVRmusician@webtv.net> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 17:00:41 -0600 (CST)   Processional by Harris (Played at Princess Margaret's wedding)   "Keep a Song in Your Heart!". . . . .Donna    
(back) Subject: Re: leathered lips From: <Seedlac@aol.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 18:05:03 EST   Leathering the upper lip of a Diapason pipe is done to reduce the amount = of harmonic development. This is especially done on pipes that are given a = high wind pressure or have very large toe openings for a large dynamic level. Delivering more wind pressure at the upper lip not only increases the = power of the fundamental but also the upper harmonics. In the early 20th century a = full, even powerful tone with a lower harmonic content was desired. I have heard = some originally leathered-lipped Diapasons sound much better without the = leather. On the other hand I was amazed to observe a 1920s Casavant Great Diapason (leathered) to produce a full but clean and fairly well developed tone.   Steve Bartley Baltimore  
(back) Subject: Re: rotting pipes? From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 18:15:07 EST   I've just not seen wooden pipes rot or get moldy, unless they've been lying on a wet basement floor for extended periods. If anything, wooden pipes tend to suffer from excessive dryness, = unless they're in some Louisiana church with 80% humidity year-'round, like the Bewitched Bayou Baptist Church of Homa, in which the Open Wood is now a pick-your-own mushroom farm.   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: leathered lips From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 18:24:50 EST   In the First (Main) Solo Division at Temple Emanu-El, we have two leathered-lip stops on 10" wind, the Stentorphone and the Violoncello, the = latter of which is extremely brilliant and incisive, and as loud as a big trumpet up = in the chamber atop the great arch [103' celing height, about 90' to the = toeboards].   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: repertoire question From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 19:16:17 -0500   on 3/14/04 5:51 PM, John L. Speller at jlspeller@mindspring.com wrote:   > Christian Ritter (~1645-~1717), Franz Tunder (1614-1667), Heinrich > Scheidemann (~1595-1663) > > John Speller >   Thanks! I will investigate those guys.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Re: Wedding Processionals From: "Milo R. Shepherd" <mrstwin2@cox.net> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 19:38:04 -0500   When I was in Germany in the service...was asked to play for a wedding. I = ended up playing the Processional from the Sound of Music. The Bride = absolutely loved the idea and it was a big hit.    
(back) Subject: Band of Brothers theme on the Organ From: "Milo R. Shepherd" <mrstwin2@cox.net> Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 19:39:37 -0500   Is there anyone out there that has written an arrangement for the theme = from the HBO miniseries Band of Brothers for the organ? I have been asked = to do an organ solo in church on Memorial Day weekend and am looking for = an arrangement. I think it would be very fitting.   Thanks for any help   Milo