PipeChat Digest #4390 - Saturday, March 27, 2004
 
Re: Blind Organists/Composers
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Great II to Choir Drawknobs
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Great II to Choir Drawknobs
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Blind Organists/Composers
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
St John's Anglican Church Lunenburg Update
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca>
Request response
  by <Oboe32@aol.com>
Organists with disabilities
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Juan Mesa Plays By the Fountain - Ridgefield, CT
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Gamble Hinge Tape
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
RE: Blind Organists/Composers
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: Blind Organists/Composers
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Organists with disabilities
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Organists with disabilities
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Blind Organists/Composers
  by "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com>
posting some Easter choral music
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Gamble Hinge Tape
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Organists with disabilities
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Organists with disabilities
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Blind Organists/Composers
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Organists with disabilities
  by <mewzishn@optonline.net>
Re: Organists with disabilities
  by "atal" <atal@sympatico.ca>
Fw: A pittiful joke
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Blind Organists/Composers From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 06:44:16 EST   In a message dated 3/26/2004 12:08:18 AM Eastern Standard Time, cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes:   > > Without too much thought, I can think of David Liddle > as a performer, Langlais as composer/performer, Alfred > Hollins as composer/performer, Vierne of course and > Andre Marchal. >   Helmut Walcha?   but he is not off the beaten path which is what i thought the first = question was.   dale in florida--showing his prof's prefs---right Master Bud?!?    
(back) Subject: Re: Great II to Choir Drawknobs From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 07:01:09 EST   I've played a 4 manual Schantz with the same couplers that were described. = However, the great stops were separated into two groups with two = nameplates. They were labeled as "Great I" which was the Principal Chorus, mixtures = and reeds, and "Great II" which was the Flute Chorus and mutations. The way = the division was laid out, only the 16' and 8' Principal was in the casework, = and then there were small "A" type chests with the flutes stuck between segments of =   the stained glass window on the front wall of the chancel. The rest of = the organ was divided on either side of the chancel behind the screen and = facade. The thinking was that by coupling the flutes off of the Great division, = you could have an unenclosed solo cornet on another manual, since the Solo, = Swell and Choir were all enclosed. I guess it is a clever idea, a money saving way = to get a "faux" mounted cornet, albeit decompose'.   On the instrument that is described in the earlier posts on this list, I would be surprised that Schantz didn't do the same kind of thing, where = the flutes and mutations can be separated out, and the knobs placed underneath the "Great I" knobs, like some builders will place Antiphonal Great knobs, or = maybe the Great II stops are all the knobs in the column on the far right of the = Great division? Schantz would have done something to differentiate the two groupings. Perhaps the divider label fell off the console?   Monty Bennett Friendship Baptist Chuch Charlotte, NC    
(back) Subject: Re: Great II to Choir Drawknobs From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 07:48:05 -0500       On Fri, 26 Mar 2004 07:01:09 EST RMB10@aol.com writes:   >On the instrument that is described in the earlier posts on this list, I would be surprised that Schantz didn't do the same kind of thing . . .       All of the conjecture in this thread has been interesting. I am surprised that someone has not simply dropped an e-mail to Schantz.   Jim  
(back) Subject: Re: Blind Organists/Composers From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 09:01:17 -0500   In a message dated 3/26/2004 12:07:22 AM Eastern Standard Time, = cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes:   > I'm sure there were/are many others, but what about > other diabilities? > > Any one handed or unidexter organists?   I knew several organists in graduate school who were dyslexic. I'm not = sure exactly what brought them to the organ instead of other instruments, = perhaps it had something to do with they would have to study their music = very carefully to make sure they were playing it correctly, and had = developed the ability to memorize things very rapidly. And being church = organists, they wouldn't have to worry to much about sight-reading, as do = orchestral instrument players at times.   I sang for years under an organist/choir director whose left leg was = artificial. When the organ at that church was redone, he made sure that = there were couplers to and from the pedals to each keyboard so that he = could do complicated pedal parts with whichever hand happened to be the = least busy, and he would assign an easy keyboard line to his right foot. = I did witness him on many occasions shift his weight on the organ bench to = allow his left foot to press the low C or D keys.   Richard  
(back) Subject: St John's Anglican Church Lunenburg Update From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 11:51:45 -0400   The web page has again been updated, please click on Phase II to get the pictures of the inside being restored www.stjohnsrestoration.com Daniel    
(back) Subject: Request response From: <Oboe32@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 16:51:19 +0100   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Organists with disabilities From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 13:09:37 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   This is going away from the original question, but who was the french organist who lost an arm in a car crash- it was put on again by a skilled surgeon but his concert career was over, alas. He dedicated himself to composing and instructing. Was it Durufle?   Our Senior Organbuilder Mr. Kurt Schmeltzer lost one finger plus two half when he got his hand into a HS router-miller. Nevertheless he managed to play organ until his late nineties- only chorales and small literature, of course.   Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.     ----- Original Message ----- From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, March 26, 2004 1:07 AM Subject: Blind Organists/Composers   SNIP > I'm sure there were/are many others, but what about > other diabilities? > > Any one handed or unidexter organists? SNIP      
(back) Subject: Juan Mesa Plays By the Fountain - Ridgefield, CT From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 12:37:58 -0500   Juan Mesa Plays By the Fountain - Ridgefield, CT - 3/24/04   I am afraid the subject heading of this post is a bit of a sad joke. The fountain in question has been a lovely feature at a major intersection in the town of Ridgefield, but it seems to draw an unwanted hypnotic sort of attention - after each rebuilding, yet another speeder is drawn to it, and the cycle begins again. First Congregational Church is right next to the fountain, and one of its musical series is called the Fountain Music = Series, and the church newsletter is also called The Fountain. They don't lose = hope.   Under the direction of Edwin Taylor, Minister of Music, the church, in addition to a number of other musical initiatives, has undertaken a series of Lenten recitals. While this church is only a forty minute ride away = from me, I have been jinxed out of attending the first three recitals, but last Wednesday, March 24th, I did make it, and heard the estimable Juan Mesa, a junior at Western Connecticut State University in Danbury, and a student = of listmember Stephen Roberts. Juan has come a long way to study with = Stephen, all the way from Chile! He has worked very hard - nothing less is = permitted in this studio - and the results are obvious. You can all hear him play at the AGO National this summer in Los Angeles.   On to the program, which began with the Bach Fantasy and Fugue in G Minor, in a performance which, I think, denied this work a bit of its bravura character, at least as I see it. It was a somewhat placid performance - although not a bad performance by any means. I really do think the tempo = of the Fugue was about the slowest I have heard, but the work endures at just about any tempo, and it is Lent, after all.   Well, if the Bach was Lenten, the rest of this fine concert spoke only of Easter. I have not always liked the Barber Variations on "Wondrous Love," but I got over that foolishness some years ago, and here in Ridgefield, = Juan gave a most stunning performance, edge of the seat kind of thing. It was = all so clear and totally musical, and registrations were wonderfully imaginative. I wondered if the congregation knew the tune when I looked at the indices in the Pilgrim Hymnal and did not find it there. No matter; = the tune is quickly assimilated.   Next, a pleasant surprise. In 1967, Dupr=E9 produced a set of three = pieces, "Entr=E9e, Canzona, and Sortie." Juan listed only the middle work, the Canzona, on the program, and before it, he spoke about the fact that in = this very late work, shown as Opus 69 in the program, and as Opus 62 in John Henderson's "Directory of Composers for Organ," Dupr=E9 returned to a = style very much more tonal than that found in his previous works. I suppose one could try to make some sort of a case out of this, but given the wonder of the earlier works, one should not try too hard! This Canzona is absolutely ravishingly beautiful, and we learned from Juan's announcement that he had decided to play also the closing work of the three, the Sortie, and that = is a fabulous piece, and received a fabulous performance.   The subject of how much people move around at the console when playing has been ground around on the Organ electronic mailing lists, and, as in so = many of those discussions, there is no real conclusion. Juan comes down heavily on the side of those who, like my teacher Vernon deTar of blessed memory, moves not one single muscle unnecessarily. Well, let me tell you that the "necessary" ones were moving full tilt, as Juan gave a breathtaking performance of the Reger Introduction and Passacaglia in D Minor. The = early bits were wonderfully lyrical, but as Reger demanded, when things heated = up, there was a palpable suppressed excitement, unleashed gradually, all under complete control. It was nothing less than stunning, and the audience responded, as they had all evening, with great vigor. Bravo Juan - on to = Los Angeles!   You can read about the Organ at the URL below, and also see a photograph = of case and console. Do click on the small picture for an enlargement - at = the larger size, it gives a much better idea of the instrument, and its relationship to the building. Wicks has done a really good job of matching the Organ to the space, both tonally and also, I think, in appearance. = It's a lot of Organ, and it is ingeniously placed in a complicated space, = without compromising egress of tone. http://www.wicks.com/organ/specs/6301.htm And, no one is going to look at this and say, "Daddy, where are the loud speakers?" (There is a 32' made of sand.)   The first three recitalists in this series were Paul W. Schmidt, Daniel Zaretsky (Russia), and Jan-Piet Knijff. Next week, another South American (Argentina), Gustavo Andres, studying with Stephen Roberts at Western Connecticut State. We owe much to Music Minister Edwin Taylor and the = church for sponsoring this series, giving us a chance to hear great Organ music, and providing this wonderful performance opportunity for these five fine musicians.   How they got this, I do not know. Someone was very quick and clever, and = the church website is at www.firstcongregational.com. If you try the usual ".org," you end up in St. Louis! You'll find more about the music here, = and about the church itself.   You have one more chance - next Wednesday at 7 p.m. Come if you can.   Cheers, and hasta la proxima carta,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com        
(back) Subject: Gamble Hinge Tape From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 12:25:06 -0600   I know that several people over the years have mentioned how much they have missed Gamble Hinge Tape for their music. Today i received the following announcement from the Gamble Co. and thought I would pass it along for those that are interested.   David   ************************************************** Gamble Re-Introduces Availability of the Music Repair Innovation   HINGE TAPE!!!   Long associated with Gamble Music Company and discontinued due to the original manufacturers ceasing production . . . and requested by our customers ever since!     ONCE MORE AVAILABLE AT GAMBLE MUSIC!!!   Item # 50-7000 10-yard roll . . . . . . . . . . $3.49   This remarkable pre-gummed 2-leaf white cloth tape has a "secret"- double perforation down the center which, when folded, makes a hinge. = Pairs of sheets can be attached together to make a hinged booklet or a continuous fanfold. Also works well to repair music books & bindings. Complete instructions included.   GAMBLE MUSIC COMPANY Website: http://www.gamblemusic.com/ E-mail:: custserv@gamblemusic.com   (800) 621-4290 -- Fax toll-free: (800) 421-3153 1313 West Randolph St. #305, Chicago, IL 60607-1515  
(back) Subject: RE: Blind Organists/Composers From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 13:32:58 -0500   Gaston Litaize was blind.   What's the story about Handel? I should know, but don't. =20   Bach was blind in has last days, because of an eye operation that = failed.   Of other early composers, there are Schlick, Landini, and Cabezon. =20    
(back) Subject: RE: Blind Organists/Composers From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 13:46:59 -0500   > > Any one handed or unidexter organists?     There was a Cambridge university chapel organist who lost an arm in one = of the world wars. David Willcocks has told the story of how many people = got in touch with this man as soon as they learned of his injury to = commiserate with him not the loss not only of his arm but of his career. = His teacher, however, was not among them. He delayed for several = weeks. Then he called on his unfortunate student and said, "I haven't = talked with you until now because I have been spending all my time at = the organ learning how to play with just one hand. IT CAN BE DONE. You = can still be a very fine service player. Don't give it up!"   I can't recall who this was. The names Patrick Hadley and Boris Ord = come to mind, but their articles in New Grove do not mention such a = handicap. Does someone know?      
(back) Subject: Re: Organists with disabilities From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 10:12:52 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Yes!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Andr=E9s G=FCnther <agun@telcel.net.ve> wrote: > Andres Gunther > agun@telcel.net.ve > > This is going away from the original question, but > who was the french > organist who lost an arm in a car crash- > Was it Durufle?     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Finance Tax Center - File online. File on time. http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Organists with disabilities From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 11:49:46 -0800   I've known QUITE a few with two left feet (grinning, ducking) ...   The old console at The Temple in Cleveland had a second set of swell shoes, pistons, etc. set WAY off to the side on the left at an angle, so evidently they had a one-legged organist at some point.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: RE: Blind Organists/Composers From: "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 12:19:59 -0800 (PST)   --- "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> wrote: > > Bach was blind in has last days, because of an eye operation > that failed. >   I believe I read in one of the "How did they die" books that both Bach and Handel had cataracts, and for Bach at least the surgeon used septic instruments (pre Pasteur medicine). The resulting infection caused the blindness, and may have precipitated his demise.   -Bill      
(back) Subject: posting some Easter choral music From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 12:44:47 -0800   I am posting some Easter music I wrote last year to the "Files" section of Gregorian@yahoogroups.com in PDF format ... look under "Bud's Music", then "Easter".   You'll need to join the group to get at the files, but it's a low-traffic group, and some of you already belong to it anyway. This SHOULD get you there so you can join:   http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/Gregorian/?yguid=3D158612861   The music is FREE; donations are CHEERFULLY accepted; as most of you know, I'm (1) retired, (2) disabled, and (3) broke as the Ten Commandments (chuckle).   CHECKS:   Raymond H. Clark 2616 University Ave. San Diego CA 92104   PAYPAL:   beejayusa@cox.net (that's the family account)   A donation of $1 US is requested per page for the MASTERS; make as many copies as you like; if you can't afford to donate, sing the stuff anyway .... I'm easy (grin).   I don't know how much I'll get posted on Gregorian; I have a LOT more. If you want a catalog, e-mail me PRIVATELY, please.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Gamble Hinge Tape From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 19:46:14 -0500   Hi David,   Thanks for that information. The circulating music library at Oberlin was all "hinged." It was a regular student job to apply the Gamble Hinges to = new music, and those bindings lasted forever. It's incredibly durable stuff, = and everything lies flat. I have now a fair bit of old music that needs treatment, so this is good news for me.   Again, many thanks for the news.   Malcolm   ----- Original Message ----- From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, March 26, 2004 1:25 PM Subject: Gamble Hinge Tape     > I know that several people over the years have mentioned how much > they have missed Gamble Hinge Tape for their music. Today i received > the following announcement from the Gamble Co. and thought I would > pass it along for those that are interested. > > David      
(back) Subject: Re: Organists with disabilities From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 20:12:40 -0600   About thirty-five years ago, when I was an undergraduate at Bristol University in England, there was an organist in Bristol named Dr. Fox, who was the retired Director of Music at Clifton College, a well-known boys public school. Dr. Fox was a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists who had lost an arm in World War I. He was devastated, since he knew that this was the end of his career as an organist. He was so upset about this that he would not even enter the same building as an organ, let alone listen to one playing. One day an organist friend approached him and told him that he knew someone who was giving an organ recital which promised to be very good and that, even if he never went to another recital again, he really hoped that he would at least try coming to this one. Fox reluctantly came along, and was in tears afterwards when he said that he had really enjoyed coming and that henceforth he would start attending organ recitals again regularly, even if he could never play the instrument.himself "Would you like to come up and meet the organist?" his friend asked. Dr. Fox duly went up to the organ loft and found Sir Hugh Allen who had just played the entire recital with one arm strapped behind his back, and must have spent weeks and weeks practising to have been able to bring it off. The whole thing had been staged for Dr. Fox's benefit. Fox realized what could be done and went on to resume a very successful career as an organist. I have always thought this was the most wonderful story.   John Speller   Andr=E9s G=FCnther wrote:   >Andres Gunther >agun@telcel.net.ve > >This is going away from the original question, but who was the french >organist who lost an arm in a car crash- it was put on again by a skilled >surgeon but his concert career was over, alas. He dedicated himself to >composing and instructing. >Was it Durufle? > >Our Senior Organbuilder Mr. Kurt Schmeltzer lost one finger plus two half >when he got his hand into a HS router-miller. Nevertheless he managed to >play >organ until his late nineties- only chorales and small >literature, of course. > >Andres >=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D >First was the cat, then was the Orgler. >The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about. > > >----- Original Message ----- >From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> >To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Sent: Friday, March 26, 2004 1:07 AM >Subject: Blind Organists/Composers > >SNIP > > >>I'm sure there were/are many others, but what about >>other diabilities? >> >>Any one handed or unidexter organists? >> >>        
(back) Subject: Re: Organists with disabilities From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 20:55:13 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   As I expected, there have been many mentions of blind organists. Were the subject that of oil painting, I suppose we wouldn't find quite so many blind artists.   But what about deaf musicians, and organists in particular?   Most people will have heard of the deaf percussionist, Evelyn Glennie, who is profoundly deaf but not totally so.   Many years ago, I took a university chapel choir to York Minster to sing Evensong, and could I find an organist?   The first year organists were too afraid, the finalists were too busy with exam preparations, and the middle lot were a very un-organistic bunch. Search as I might, I had to look further afield.   At the time, there was a sixteen year old organist known to me, who was studying with a cathedral organist. I thought that service accompaniment at somewhere like York Minster might help him if it appeared on his c.v., and duly contacted him.   I recall that, on the day, he turned up well and truly wired for sound, with a transducer pack and a discreet headphone set. He thrust a lavalier microphone at me, and told me where and how to wear it, so that he could hear my instructions....so I thought.   Bearing in mind that he was sat at the screen console, behind a curtain, our line of communication was via a small TV monitor and the audio link.   Before rehearsal, the young organist had asked me if I would sing with the choir, which I agreed to do as I flapped my arms about. In fairness to him and the choir, I had chosen music which didn't require massive changes of registration or dynamic.....I think the anthem was "Rejoice in the Lord" by Purcell, and the setting by Walmisley (the little known D major). However, the psalms were more challenging, and I decided to set him the task of accompanying them.   To suggest that practise went well would be an understatement....it went almost perfectly. We had pre-arranged signals for dynamic levels (especially the swell box) and this also worked perfectly, with everything in balance.   The service itself went well, and the pre-service voluntaries were played by the young deaf organist, with my final contribution designed to be HEARD....the Cocker "Tuba Tune."   I dragged him out for dinner that evening, and asked how such profound deafness seemed not to be an obstacle to his performances. He revealed that, although profoundly deaf (deafer in fact than the percussionist previously mentioned) he could feel vibrations; especially bass note vibrations, which the microphone on my chest was picking up as I sang bass.   Using these vibrations and my dynamic cues, he was able to accompany magnificently and without a single glitch in the proceedings.   I am very pleased to report that this plucky and enterprising young man eventually went to Oxford University, where he studied music at Wadham College and gained a good degree. Unfortunately, no allowances were made in the aural exams of the Royal College of Organists for deaf people, and he could not gain the necessary pass mark. Eventually, after a lot of badgering, they relented, and he sailed through with flying colours to gain the FRCO.   The last I heard of the young man, Paul Whittaker, he was involved in "Music for the deaf" and inspiring others to follow his example.   Regards,     Colin Mitchell UK                   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Finance Tax Center - File online. File on time. http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html  
(back) Subject: RE: Blind Organists/Composers From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 20:56:49 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   So what was Ligetti's excuse?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> wrote: > Gaston Litaize was blind.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Finance Tax Center - File online. File on time. http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Organists with disabilities From: <mewzishn@optonline.net> Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 23:56:57 -0500   One of the most recent, if not the most recent, organists to have to face such a challenge as this would be Mark Thallander.   http://www.christianexaminer.com/Articles/Articles%20Feb04/ Art_Feb04_02.html   To say that his recovery has been remarkable, if not miraculous, is an understatement.   Kenneth L. Sybesma Choirmaster and Organist Church of the Advent, Westbury NY Temple Organist & Director of Children's Music Temple Or Elohim, Jericho NY    
(back) Subject: Re: Organists with disabilities From: "atal" <atal@sympatico.ca> Date: Sat, 27 Mar 2004 00:04:54 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, March 26, 2004 9:12 PM Subject: Re: Organists with disabilities     Dr. Fox duly went up to > the organ loft and found Sir Hugh Allen who had just played the entire > recital with one arm strapped behind his back, and must have spent weeks > and weeks practising to have been able to bring it off. The whole thing > had been staged for Dr. Fox's benefit.     This is indeed a wonderful story to remember - especially in a world where pettiness and nastiness seem to be the dominating themes. Thank you John, for sharing this with us!   Andreas Thiel St. Marys, Ontario     > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Fw: A pittiful joke From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Sat, 27 Mar 2004 09:45:19 -0000   And the answer to my question is .......   Track Title: Mr. Pitiful Album Title: Atlantic Rhythm & Blues: Vol 5, 1961-1965 Prime Artist: Otis Redding Producer: Jim Stewart Written by: Otis Redding Written by: = Steve Cropper   They call me Mr. Pitiful Baby thet's my name now They call me Mr. Pitiful Thet's how I got my fame   But people just don`t seem to understand How someone can feel so blue They call me Mr Pitiful cause I lost someone just like you.   -----Original Message----- From: MusicMan <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 24 March 2004 13:41 Subject: Re: A pittiful joke     In the meantime I'll just carry-on playing ... "They call me, Mr. = Pitiful." Now tell me who recorded THAT !