PipeChat Digest #4392 - Sunday, March 28, 2004
 
Re: Blind Organists/Composers
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Felix Hell in New Zealand
  by <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Re: Pipe Mitering (reply)
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Felix Celebrates 350 With Old Friends (part 1)
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Metz
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
Re: Metz
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Metz
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
New Organ in the Diapason
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Pipe Mitering (reply)
  by "SCOTT BILOT" <pinwiz@prodigy.net>
Re: Pipe Mitering (reply)
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Pipe Mitering (reply)
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Tickets Now Available - Felix Hell Benefit Concert
  by <niksiz@comcast.net>
Felix Celebrates 350 With Old Friends (part 2 of 2)
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Pipe Mitering (reply)
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Blind Organists/Composers From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 14:38:47 +0100 (BST)   Interesting re Helmut Walcha - Maurice Forsyth-Grant, whose house organ, complete with None, was mentioned on another list yesterday, used to say that his conversion to the Classical organ came like St Paul on the road to Damascus, when he heard Walcha play in the flesh for a confirmation service. Out went romanticism, in came tracker action, low wind pressures and un-nicked stops. Quite a lot of inspiration from this one specific event can be heard in England today - New College, Oxford, York University, and others. John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Gibson's "Passion" Jokes, satire and humour     ___________________________________________________________ WIN FREE WORLDWIDE FLIGHTS - nominate a cafe in the Yahoo! Mail Internet = Cafe Awards www.yahoo.co.uk/internetcafes  
(back) Subject: Felix Hell in New Zealand From: <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 15:50:25 +0200     Dear listmembers,   this is to inform yout that Felix Hell will perform in October this year at the INTERNATIONAL ORGAN PROMS in Christchurch Townhall, New Zealand. For more info (Prom series, organ, etc) please look at:   www.nzorgan.com/events/2004series_felix_hell.htm     Hans-Friedrich Hell        
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Mitering (reply) From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 08:59:17 EST   In a message dated 3/27/2004 4:50:45 PM Eastern Standard Time, pinwiz@prodigy.net writes: .. I have mitered and soldered pipes before, but they were mostly Strings = and smaller scale stuff. I have limited shop equipment, and my 10" table saw = will not be able to do the job this time. Does anyone out there have any ideas? =   Let's presume that your pipes are made of Zinc. I would construct a large size Mitre box (similar to the one's a = woodworker would use to cut angles of mouldings used as trim in houses) and use a = very sharp hack-saw to cut the pipe at the appropriate angles.   keep in mind that you will still need to tune these pipes after they are mitred.   have you considered mounting them horizontally? it is not that hard to = make a set of 'cradles' that would support the pipes at 2 or 3 places and still allow access for tuning/regulation. They could be tubed from the windchest = if need be.   Rick in VA    
(back) Subject: Felix Celebrates 350 With Old Friends (part 1) From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 09:15:08 -0500   Happy weekend to All, The weekends provide nearly my only opportunity to catch up on the week's email and do the writing I want to do in response. This weekend is dedicated to telling you a story that is fascinating, endearing, and exciting all at once. It is the story of musical friends converging to celebrate a milestone in a young organist's career, and it is also the story of how Felix Hell came to the USA, and ending up staying for the past 7 years. Felix Hell played recital number 350 in Huntsville Alabama on March 14, 2004 at Trinity United Methodist Church. That record of achievement is astounding enough, but the fact that it was played on the same American Eclectic Instrument that Felix ever touched back in 1998, makes this tale even more interesting. Just how does a 12 year old German Organist happen to come to the States to play an organ recital? For Felix, it was just a matter of opening a door with a 5 inch long key. I will let Hans Hell tell you the story in his own words by quoting an email he sent me and has given me permission to reprint.   Dear Mike, The tittle in a German newspaper recently was:   "Felix Hell's 350th career recital - or: What has a wine festival in the Palatine village of Dirmstein to do with Felix Hell's career in America?"   As you might know, Mike, in Germany we are living in a wine growing area, the Palatinate (German: Pfalz). It's located in the Southwest of Germany, about 50 miles south of Frankfurt, and on the west side of the Rhine River. The history of cultivating wine there goes back 2000 years. The Romans brought it to the area. In the fall you have hundreds of wine festivities in the area, celebrating wine and food of the area, often together with a parish fairs. The occasion I am telling about was such a festival in the historical village of Dirmstein, fall 1997. A wonderful evening. The whole family is hanging on at such a wine celebration outside in the yard of a winery, surrounded by more than 1000 year old walls, enjoying the wonderful wines (not the kids, of course), Palatine cuisine, in a word: having a great time with each other and all the other people, many of them guests, you never met before. An elder couple, sitting on the opposite side of our table, is obviously doing hard to follow all the conversation, mostly in a kind of local dialect. But as they mingled in the discussions about God and the world, we realized, their try to speak German is hard for them, so we tried it in English and, after the first response, realized, that the couple must be from America. The wine did his further job, and step by step, we became friends, sort of friends for the evening. As at most of these parties, the musical background is that of a electronic keyboard, or an accordion, playing   popular tunes, or local folk tunes, etc. But when it got louder - and worse - at that evening, we felt, Felix could not stand the music, making deprecating remarks about music and musician, and the elder gentlemen asked him, whether he didn't like music. "O I love music, but not that one" - "What kind of music do you like?" - "Organ music" - "Interesting! I have an electronic Hammond at home" - "Geeee!!" The elder gentlemen was a little bit disappointed about the kid, which did not appreciate his Hammond, and Felix threw into the discussion: "Real organ music". That obviously revoked the curiosity of the man, and, after a while, he asked: "So you go to church on Sunday to hear organ music?" - "No" - "What, no?" - "I just play it" - "You play it? Where?"- "Just there!" pointing to an old church on the opposite side of the winery. "Are you allowed to play the organ there?" - "Of course, I am the organist there" The old guy looked as if he just had heard one of the sort of unreal jokes. But before he could react, Felix took the key out of his pocket, a big old key, 5 inches long. "Would you like me to play for you?" Half an hour later, we all, i.e. Olga, my wife, Andreas (Felix's elder brother), me, and the elder couple climbed up to the organ gallery of St. Laurence in Dirmstein, a beautiful 250 year old baroque church, built by the Baroque master Balthasar Neumanm. The organ, a tracker with 32 ranks, built 1988 by Peter Vier, Black Forest, into an old baroque organ case. The acoustics: does not leave any wishes open. Felix played Bach. 10 Minutes. Silence. 20 Minutes. Silence. 30 minutes. The old man was sitting there, staring spellbound towards Felix. But then, suddenly, he jumped up. Went to Felix. embracing him, saying: "And I will bring you to America", while tears were running down his face..... A friendship was born, a friendship between an 12 year old boy and 70 year old man. Felix from Germany - Dick Esneault from Huntsville.   Seven months later, April 18, 1998, the airplane of DELTA Airlines from Atlanta, taxiing at the airport of Huntsville, Alabama, stopped at the gate. The door opened, and the new friends hugged each other. April 19, 1998. Felix played his second recital in the USA at Trinity United Methodist Church of Huntsville before an audience of 1200. Packed house.   The reason that this was not his first, but his second recital in the USA, was, that after it became clear, that Felix would travel to America, another of our long year friends, Dr. Thomas Schmidt, St. Peter's Church in Manhattan, gave Felix the opportunity for a recital on a stop over in NYC before continuing his trip to Huntsville. Therefore, Felix's first recital was on April 17, 1998 at St. Peter's in Manhattan, the church where he later became Organ Scholar and Assistant Organist.   Cordially Hans   So, there you have the story about how Felix happened to play the Moller at Trinity United Methodist Church the first time in 1998, and in the next part, I will tell you about his 350th recital just 2 weeks ago.   Cheers Mike Gettelman            
(back) Subject: Metz From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 08:49:38 -0600   Does any one have any info on Metz, the organ builder form St. Louis in = the 1850's Thanks James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Artisan of Wood WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 pianoman@accessus.net      
(back) Subject: Re: Metz From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 09:00:07 -0600   At 8:49 AM -0600 03/28/04, James Grebe wrote: >Does any one have any info on Metz, the organ builder form St. Louis in the >1850's   James   The David Fox Guide to north American=20 Organbuilders has several entries for Metz:   Metz, Christof Born c. 1804 in Saxony, Germany; in St. Louis, MO, by 1850, laborer; with Wilhelm Metz of St. Louis, MO, 1859.     Metz, Ferdinand Born c. 1832 in Saxony, Germany; with William Metz of St. Louis, MO, 1859, foreman.     Metz, Johann Wilhelm [John William] Born 6 Feb. 1818 in Strasf=FCrth bei Erfurt, Saxony, Germany; in St. Louis, MO, by 1845; retired to Collionsville, IL, c. 1865; succeeded by Johann G. Pfeffer, 1864; died 17 Apr. 1896 in Collinsville, IL. Staff: Christof Metz; Ferdinand Metz   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Metz From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 10:15:51 -0600   Thank you for the info James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Artisan of Wood WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message ----- From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, March 28, 2004 9:00 AM Subject: Re: Metz     At 8:49 AM -0600 03/28/04, James Grebe wrote: >Does any one have any info on Metz, the organ builder form St. Louis in = the >1850's   James   The David Fox Guide to north American Organbuilders has several entries for Metz:   Metz, Christof Born c. 1804 in Saxony, Germany; in St. Louis, MO, by 1850, laborer; with Wilhelm Metz of St. Louis, MO, 1859.     Metz, Ferdinand Born c. 1832 in Saxony, Germany; with William Metz of St. Louis, MO, 1859, foreman.     Metz, Johann Wilhelm [John William] Born 6 Feb. 1818 in Strasf=FCrth bei Erfurt, Saxony, Germany; in St. Louis, MO, by 1845; retired to Collionsville, IL, c. 1865; succeeded by Johann G. Pfeffer, 1864; died 17 Apr. 1896 in Collinsville, IL. Staff: Christof Metz; Ferdinand Metz   David "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: New Organ in the Diapason From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 11:43:50 -0500   Greetings to All, Might I take this opportunity to draw your attention to the "New Organs" section in the March Diapason which features Richard Schneider's Opus 23 in Berne Indiana at First Mennonite Church. I don't know if Rich would tell you the difficult circumstances that surrounded this project were worth it to him, but I will tell you the instrument is spectacular in finished form, and is testimonial to Rich's determination, skill, and flexibility as an organ builder. It is well worth the trip to go and hear it if you can. I would also like to thank Rich for mentioning my name in the credits for this instrument. I played a very small part in some installation work at Berne, and to see my name mentioned in the likes of Diapason Magazine is the thrill of a lifetime for me. Cheers Mike Gettelman    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Mitering (reply) From: "SCOTT BILOT" <pinwiz@prodigy.net> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 10:38:59 -0800 (PST)   HEllo! I have thought about the miter box thing before, but damn if I can = find a hacksaw with a large enough throat to go through the pipe. Others = have suggested that I mount them horizontally as well. That idea is = beginning to sound better and better all the time. Thanks for your input! Scott   RMaryman@aol.com wrote: In a message dated 3/27/2004 4:50:45 PM Eastern Standard Time, = pinwiz@prodigy.net writes: .. I have mitered and soldered pipes before, but they were mostly Strings = and smaller scale stuff. I have limited shop equipment, and my 10" table = saw will not be able to do the job this time. Does anyone out there have = any ideas? Let's presume that your pipes are made of Zinc. I would construct a large size Mitre box (similar to the one's a = woodworker would use to cut angles of mouldings used as trim in houses) = and use a very sharp hack-saw to cut the pipe at the appropriate angles. keep in mind that you will still need to tune these pipes after they are = mitred. have you considered mounting them horizontally? it is not that hard to = make a set of 'cradles' that would support the pipes at 2 or 3 places and = still allow access for tuning/regulation. They could be tubed from the = windchest if need be. Rick in VA    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Mitering (reply) From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 13:58:14 -0500   Hello Scott, As a rather seasoned veteran of using tools of all types in metal fabrication, and often required to make the appropriate tool, I would simply procure the blade from an industrial power hacksaw and form my own handle to carry it taunt like a bow saw. It would be a 2 man operation to obtain clean, accurate miter cuts in a wooden miter box built to size, but the soft alloys should cut quickly and easily. I would hate to see you deprived of the joy of creating mitered pipes by your own hand simply because you can't cut them, that is unless you wish to avoid those many hours it would take. I that case you can't beat the horizontal tubed off approach. Mike Gettelman (who wishes he could solder well enough to justify cutting up some pipes)     SCOTT BILOT wrote:   > HEllo! I have thought about the miter box thing > before, but damn if I can find a hacksaw with a large > enough throat to go through the pipe. Others have > suggested that I mount them horizontally as well. > That idea is beginning to sound better and better all > the time. Thanks for your input! Scott >    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Mitering (reply) From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 13:00:57 -0600   Scott Bilot wrote:   > HEllo! I have thought about the miter box thing before, . . .if I can = find a > hacksaw with a large enough throat to go through the pipe.   Our Pipeshop has a 14" Radial Arm Saw equipped with a special extra-fine metal-cutting blade for just such a purpose. We would have no problem doing this for you.   Faithfully,   G.A. -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO <>< Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS  
(back) Subject: Tickets Now Available - Felix Hell Benefit Concert From: <niksiz@comcast.net> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 19:00:12 +0000   Greetings,   Felix Hell will play a benefit concert on the restored 10,731 pipe Curtis = Organ at Irvine Auditorium in Philadelphia, PA on Saturday, June 12th at = 7:30pm.   TICKETS ARE NOW AVAILABLE at $15 per person and can be obtained by phone, = mail, or in person by contacting:   Annenberg Center Box Office University of Pennsylvania 3680 Walnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19104 215.898.3900   Irvine Auditorium is located at 34th and Spruce Streets in Philadelphia, = PA on the beautiful University of Pennsylvania campus.   Mark your calendars and plan to join us on Saturday, June 12th at 7:30pm = (and please forward this information to your friends and collegues)!   -- Nikola Sizgorich niksiz@comcast.net  
(back) Subject: Felix Celebrates 350 With Old Friends (part 2 of 2) From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 14:18:29 -0500   Huntsville Alabama happens to be the place of my birth. I've been told I was whisked away to Cleveland Ohio as soon as I was dry from the womb, and have spent the rest of my 54 years here without ever seeing Huntsville. So it wasn't just the 350th Felix Hell recital that urged me to make the 1300 mile round trip car journey in a short, long weekend. It was a pilgrimage. Well, it's a good thing Felix's recital was a wonderful event, because the pilgrimage part was rather anti climatic. There's nothing particularly special about Huntsville itself other than their ever present shrines to the rocket ship, but they sure know how to gather a large group of 800 organ loving patrons together to hear a special musical performance. Felix would get a lot of bench time at the console of the 4/54 Moller at Trinity United Methodist Church on Sunday, March 14th. It began at the end of the 11am worship service when he played the Vierne Final for the Postlude. There was no congregational exodus after the benediction this day. His first of several standing ovations for the day followed. With a couple of hours between the service and the appointed recital time, I had the chance to properly meet this Moller that Felix played upon. It is the first Moller I ever saw or heard live, and somehow I anticipated letdown. That was not the case here. This is a beautiful instrument to look at and even more radiant to hear. The main organ is split in equal portions either side the alter, each section with a generously spaced apart facade that allowed you to see the chambers behind. Felix played his recital with the chamber lights on, and it was interesting to see the swell shutter movements. I was also fascinated to see much of the lower octave Bombarde pipes were in the facade at the sides with Violone pipes towards the center. I had never seen reeds in a facade and thought it unusual. The icing on this cake is provided by a full rank of horizontal trumpets mounted high at the back of the sanctuary. Though authoritative, they blended well with full organ. I thought Felix used them with tasteful restraint, but there are many points in his repertoire that benefited their use, and use them he did. It is interesting to note that this organ was badly damaged by a tornado a number of years ago, and was lovingly restored as original. This is one of the last instruments to come from the Moller company, and it is nice to see it so wonderfully cared for both historically and functionally. The recital started promptly at 2pm with an eclectic blend of works which felix has learned to program so well.   Prelude and Fugue D Major, BWV 532 Johann Sebastian Bach What a stunning program opener. Felix has several choices of major Bach pieces in his repertoire to launch his recitals, but the BWV 532 certainly prepares the audience for what is yet to come. He made it sound like Bach actually wrote the piece for a Moller.   "O Mensch bewein dein Suende gross", BWV 622 Bach We often hear this piece second in a Felix recital. If you are stunned by technical wizardry of the opener, you will marvel at the sensitivity of which Felix is quite capable as well.   Sonata No. 4, F Minor op. 65 Felix Mendelssohn Hans said Felix has included this piece in his programs for about a year now, though I think it is the first time I heard him play it. If it isn't, I had my ears blocked at the time, for I thoroughly enjoyed this wonderful work in 4 movements. If Bach is the foundation of organ literature, I think Mendelssohn forms some of the framework upon which traditional organ sound stems. It seems to prepare you better for the leap from Bach to Liszt.   Consolation Dflat Major   Prelude and Fugue on B-A-C-H Frantz Liszt I grouped these 2 pieces together, for that is how Felix played them in this recital. He greets the audience at this point and asks them not to applaud between the two pieces. This is an example of how Felix has learned to use silence as another stop on the organ. It is not the only place he has been known to use it. If you ever hear him play the Barber "Adagio for Strings", (a piece that has been the subject of much discussion lately on one of the organ lists), you will find he gets an emotion filled silence at the end without even asking for it. The effect is devastating on your tear glands. The effect in the 2 Liszt pieces is quite different. The Consolation is pastoral, almost gentle, despite the emerging poly tonality. Once the B-A-C-H starts gathering steam, you begin to marvel at the musical extremes Liszt is capable of and is sort of a mirror of his personality as a composer. What's really great about listening to Felix is he teaches and instructs his audiences all the time if the student is willing and attentive. When people ask me for my organ credentials these days, I just tell them I study under Felix Hell (grin).   Intermission This is always one of my favorite times at a Felix recital. With over 800 seats sold for this concert, there were plenty of conversations to eves drop on. There was much head shaking everywhere and many were wondering how he could top the first half. I found myself in conversation with the man seated next to me who turns out to be the curator for the organ we were hearing. For me, that was like striking gold in the middle of a diamond mine. I leaned that the Moller was perhaps the very last out of the Moller Factory when they closed, and I learned it had once been ripped apart by a tornado, and lovingly rebuilt as original. I was quite surprised, but quite pleased to learn that part of the 16' Bombarde is actually in the facade. Get them pedal reeds out front where they can do some good (grin). There is also a full rank of horizontal trumpets on the back wall of the beautiful timber framed sanctuary, so we all had the chance to party with Felix the tastefully few times he used the rank to emphasize those musical points where they gloriously carry the climax. These are reasonable and yet powerful horns which can still blend into the ensemble as a usable stop. I got to hear them alone during one of Felix's encounter sessions following the recital, and they can still announce the approach of kings if the need arises also.   Fantasy F Minor, KV 608 Wolfgang Amedeus Mozart Before becoming a serious student to the organ about 3 1/2 years ago, my closest reference to the man Mozart came from the movie "Amedeus". I'm not sure if the portrayal of Wolfgang in that movie was at all historically accurate, but he was certainly an entertaining character in the movie. I think he would have gotten along great with Virgil Fox. This piece will certainly educate you on contrapuntal progression and the widest ranges of expression from the delicate to the glorious. I love Mozart, and certainly hope he was as lighthearted and cheerful as "Amedeus" made him out to be.   Sonata No.1 D Minor Felix Alexandre Guilmant With my tongue firmly planted in my cheek, and positively no disrespect intended, I suggest to you that this piece has become Felix's "Proud Mary". Those who have followed his career for several years and have heard him play the Enjott Schneider Toccata, we might have supposed that it might become Felix's signature work. Don't get me wrong, I love the ferocity of the Toccata, but am much more appreciative of Guilmant's three movement Sonata, particularly the center Pastorale movement. Here is another place Felix uses silence to great effect, taking a long time to relax his posture at the end of the beautiful sweet movement. Being surrounded by the quick "Introduction et Allegro", and the powerful Final Movements, the Pastoral seems almost an oasis. The Final brings out all of the organ, maybe even the Zimbelstern (grin), and This mighty 54 rank Moller was certainly up to the task without blowing anyone out of the room. The rear Trumpets countered the front organ which had all it's shades wide, and we felt like we were looking through Heaven's door. In the midst of the final chord, I think I saw Felix draw the Zimbelstern, the only knob left, but I could be wrong. 800 people were more than appreciative enough to generate an encore, and we got the Vierne Final ala Working on the Railroad. He thanked his audience before beginning, and told them to listen for the slight improvisational moment near the end of the movement, and applaud if we got the joke. He need not have instructed us however, for when the moment came, Felix turned to look at us over his shoulder, and cued us like we were his choir. The audience roared. I think the grin on his face at that moment made my trip to Huntsville complete, and I know now why I went despite the long distance drive and the difficulty in getting the trip scheduled on short notice. I went because I needed to be energized again by Felix, and also by Hans. Between the musical experience, and the freely given fellowship I enjoy with the 2 of them, I always come away as if floating. I hardly remember the rigors of driving 625 miles home the next day. The term "natural high" has been often used and abused, but I can think of no better words to describe what I feel for days after I come in touch with Felix and Hans. They make me feel important to them, and I receive the richest of rewards in turn. God Bless them both, and Olga as well. She and Hans haven given a gift to the world, and there promises to be oh so much more to come. Following the recital Felix greeted his many friends and I got the chance to meet Dick Esneault and his wife, the folks responsible for bringing Felix to play in the USA 7 years ago. They were absolutely beaming this day, and couldn't have been happier and prouder of Felix had he been their own son. Afterwards Felix returned to the console to hold several encounter sessions for some different children groups. I happily watched as he related to his wide eyed young audience, and got to hear him play the T&F in D Minor (which he never plays in recital), and of course one more time for the Vierne Final. From the first note of that day to the last, I can not ever remember having such a terrific musical experience. As I write this, I am already planning to attend 3 more of Felix's recitals by the end of July. Certainly I will hear others play in between, but the total experience will not be quite the same. I've become quite spoiled I'm afraid. Cheers to ALL Mike Gettelman    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Mitering (reply) From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 13:35:53 -0600   At 01:00 PM 3/28/04, you wrote: >Our Pipeshop has a 14" Radial Arm Saw equipped with a special extra-fine >metal-cutting blade for just such a purpose. We would have no problem >doing this for you. > >Faithfully, > >G.A   Scott....its' a nice trip in the country if'n you don't get lost in the cornfield. I know Rich will take good care of you.   Jon