PipeChat Digest #4472 - Saturday, May 1, 2004
 
Re: Aaaaalrighty then...lets have come round table discussion
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: pipe vs. electronic (AGAIN)..reply ro Richard
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
The firm in Europe is Reiger Kloss
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Victoria...I like you aLOT!
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: organ in Chicago
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Senior Recital
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: electronic substitutes (kinda long)
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Re: electronic substitutes (kinda long)
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Electronic instruments
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Choral music for sale
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: electronic substitutes (kinda long)
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
St. Ita's long ago
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: St. Ita's long ago
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
RE: pipes and bang for your bucks
  by "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Aaaaalrighty then...lets have come round table discussion From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 12:47:37 EDT   Hello nicemusica@yahoo.com,     In reference to your comment: What kinds of organs do you all play? What types of rooms are they in? = What do you not like about the organ? what would you change? If you are a = builder, how much organ would I get from you for 200K? What kind of repertoire do = you do for church? Are you absolutely in love with this insrtument? If is goes = caput tomorrow, what would you replace it with if you had 200K?   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I play an elderly but well-maintained Hammond C-3 in an AME Zion Church, = and a Yamaha upright piano is fairly good condition. The room is small - = seats around 120 when packed (I've never seen that!). Ceiling height is around = 15'. There are two stained glass windows by the altar, and the remainder of the =   windows, on all four sides of the room, are simple tinted glass on the = bottom and clear on the top. The main floor of the church is one room with a very = small foyer, and the basement is divided into a wonderful kitchen and a dining/meeting room.   I WISH the organ had more dedicated sounds. The "trumpet" is especially = not there. There are presets as well as drawbars, though, so I'll have to = keep tinkering. AND remembering to write down the combinations that work!   As for changes, it's a Hammond in a small Gospel church, so it's very appropriate. There is no room in the sanctuary for pipes - they had to = take out pews to make room for the Hammond.   My repetoire is a lot of hymn arrangements, some early Baroque music, some =   Lorenz from the fifties, some Gaither - pretty eclectic. The congregation = loves hearing something they recognize. There was no organist or choir for some =   time before I started last September, and I have the beginnings of a choir = now, singing 3-part harmony (I'm the only alto).   Am I in love with instrument? Well, it DOES fit the worship style of the church. And it is fun to play. Would I take one home if offered? = Absolutely.   If it went totally caput tomorrow, I'd find a good Hammond tech. Old Hammonds never die. And I'd use the remainder of the $200k for a new roof = for the church, some good repairs to the stained glass windows (broken spaces were =   replaced with clear glass to stabilize it), I'd make the basement meeting = area handicapped accessible, and I'd endow the church's food pantry. I might = even pave the church's driveway. As much as I love playing a pipe organ, it = wouldn't be a good or appropriate use of the church's money to install one.   Victoria  
(back) Subject: Re: pipe vs. electronic (AGAIN)..reply ro Richard From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 09:58:51 -0700 (PDT)   Eloquently said Richard. I go wherever they pay me. Pipe, Electronic, Allen TC, Moller, or = Flentrop. I have mission to work in Sacred Music and am not above digital = instruments. My pastor too, loves organ music, as he did some of his = deaconate at the National Shrine in DC and heard several fine organists = while there. He too want's another instrument, and is tired of the current = one, and tired of the company that has gotten over on us, and has said = that before we rubild a bad pipe organ, he'd rather a decent digital be in = place.   Richard Hazelip <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> wrote: It has been said by a recent poster: >>I think everyone who seeks out electronic instruments have no idea what = a good organ is.>> You had best re-think posting that kind of global assumption! I don't = "seek out" electronic instruments to play, neither to I have no idea what = a good organ is. I resent your implication. I have two degrees in organ = performance and soon will complete my terminal degree if it does not = terminate me first. I have heard and played many very fine instruments = and have fairly strong opinions on the ones I like, the ones I don't like, = and the reasons for those opinions. My church has recently spent damn = near a million dollars on a new educational wing because it was = desperately needed. There will be no money for a pipe organ (even if my = priest and desperately want one) until this debt is retired. I don't play = electronic organs because they are my preference. I play them because = that is what is in place at this current time! I also just happen to = believe that my paycheck depends on doing everything well, not just = carping about the organ or about the inability of the church to upgrade into a pipe organ. RIchard Hazelip     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
(back) Subject: The firm in Europe is Reiger Kloss From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 10:09:52 -0700 (PDT)   ....That feels that the voicers may not have much to work with, except the = new ranks put in at 1970 from some ABC pipe shop in Milwaukee. They are = thinking putting a tracker in the front with a detached keydesk, so that = the side ailes can pass thru for communion and so that I can see the = choir. I will try to send anyone who wants pictures of the church. They = are giving renderings...and the think that the side wall may hold some = ranks, and put an antiphonal placement as well. It woudl be on dual = action...tracker and slider...with Wacker Digital stops...all the = Principals would be pipe, the important flutes, cornets, long resonator = reeds, festival trumpet, also would be pipe. The celestes etc would be = digital and some other things. if i get money to jump at that...im goign = to sop it up with a biscuit. Ok then...I'll take you up on that...but you gotta win the lottery, = Dennis. But remember, we can't have the stuff in the back much more! haha       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
(back) Subject: Victoria...I like you aLOT! From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 10:13:16 -0700 (PDT)   You are happy with where you are...as I am. Im just trying to get things = done.   Myosotis51@aol.com wrote:Hello nicemusica@yahoo.com,     In reference to your comment: What kinds of organs do you all play? What types of rooms are they in? = What do you not like about the organ? what would you change? If you are a = builder, how much organ would I get from you for 200K? What kind of repertoire do = you do for church? Are you absolutely in love with this insrtument? If is goes = caput tomorrow, what would you replace it with if you had 200K?   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I play an elderly but well-maintained Hammond C-3 in an AME Zion Church, = and a Yamaha upright piano is fairly good condition. The room is small - seats =   around 120 when packed (I've never seen that!). Ceiling height is around = 15'. There are two stained glass windows by the altar, and the remainder of the =   windows, on all four sides of the room, are simple tinted glass on the = bottom and clear on the top. The main floor of the church is one room with a very = small foyer, and the basement is divided into a wonderful kitchen and a dining/meeting room.   I WISH the organ had more dedicated sounds. The "trumpet" is especially = not there. There are presets as well as drawbars, though, so I'll have to keep =   tinkering. AND remembering to write down the combinations that work!   As for changes, it's a Hammond in a small Gospel church, so it's very appropriate. There is no room in the sanctuary for pipes - they had to = take out pews to make room for the Hammond.   My repetoire is a lot of hymn arrangements, some early Baroque music, some =   Lorenz from the fifties, some Gaither - pretty eclectic. The congregation = loves hearing something they recognize. There was no organist or choir for some time before I started last September, and I have the beginnings of a choir = now, singing 3-part harmony (I'm the only alto).   Am I in love with instrument? Well, it DOES fit the worship style of the church. And it is fun to play. Would I take one home if offered? = Absolutely.   If it went totally caput tomorrow, I'd find a good Hammond tech. Old Hammonds never die. And I'd use the remainder of the $200k for a new roof = for the church, some good repairs to the stained glass windows (broken spaces were =   replaced with clear glass to stabilize it), I'd make the basement meeting = area handicapped accessible, and I'd endow the church's food pantry. I might = even pave the church's driveway. As much as I love playing a pipe organ, it wouldn't =   be a good or appropriate use of the church's money to install one.   Victoria "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org         From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
(back) Subject: Re: organ in Chicago From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 13:14:36 -0500   I'd like to try it sometime. How can this be arranged? The only time I = heard this organ live was back around 1958 when Gaston Litaize gave a recital there. Was it Holloway who worked on it last year and added a 32' = extension to the incredible 16' Bombarde? There was an AGO recital there, IIRC, some months back, but I couldn't get there.   Bob Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: black <gblack@ocslink.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 8:11 AM Subject: organ in Chicago     > HI to Desiree and all who live in Chicago. I would like your opinions of the > organ rebuild at St. Ita's on Broadway; just curious. Thanks, Gary      
(back) Subject: Senior Recital From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 14:22:07 -0400   The program said: "Eighty-Ninth Student Recital, Thursday, April 29, 2004, Field Concert Hall, 8 p.m." Doesn't sound particularly significant, does it? Actually, it was an historic event. A "Rite of Passage" for a performer who will surely leave a major mark on the world of music. Felix Hell is graduating from the Curtis Institute of Music and this was as much a celebration of that graduation as it was an academic recital. At 18 years old, he is the youngest organ student to ever receive a BM degree from the school founded by Mary Louise Curtis Bok in 1924. The graduates of Curtis are legendary and next week Felix will be joining that august group. But on Thursday, Felix was a tad nervous with the preparations for the recital and the finals of his other classes. I left Skaneateles about 1:30 for the drive to Philadelphia. The sun was shining, it was warm and a very pleasant drive. Never having been there before, I was pleased that my computer mapping program got me into the heart of Philadelphia without problems. Arriving just before six, I found a place to park in a garage about 3 blocks away and started up Locust St. to the Curtis building. A few doors from my destination I met Mike Gettleman, who had driven in from Cleveland earlier in the afternoon and as we were standing talking, Hans and Olga Hell walked up on their way to the recital, as well. Amidst all the tall skyscrapers of downtown Philadelphia, the Curtis Institute seems even smaller than it is. Could this diminutive building actually house such a famous institution? Entering the lobby, the grand staircase, fireplace, and ornate wood carvings looked more like a grand residence than a school, until you noticed the grand pianos in almost every corner ! Behind the reception=92s desk was a hallway that led to the Field Concert Hall. At it=92s entrance I was greeted by Curtis Student Todor Stefanov Popstoyanov, from Bulgaria, a friend of Felix=92s and a French Horn student of Jerome Ashby. It was heartening to see that fellow students volunteered their time to help with each other=92s recitals and a brief conversation with Todor proved that he, too, is an exceptional young man. The Field Concert Hall is quite a shock, if you've never seen it. It is TINY ! Maybe 30 x 60 feet, with wood paneled walls. Behind these walls, seemingly everywhere, were the 120 ranks of the 5 manual Aeolian Skinner organ. A lot has been said of the Organ at Curtis, most of it rather uncomplimentary. I can only describe it as the "Dragon in the closet". It=92s huge, it has scales, it can breath fire and it does sound like its crammed into the closet (probably because it is). Also in that small room you really wouldn't want to let it out ! I found the room odd in that the "stage" is set on the long wall the room and there are organ chambers all around the room. Felix chose to approach this room differently than the norm, by having the console placed on floor on one of the short walls effectively "turning " the room 90 degrees. This change, combined with Felix=92s well documented ability to find perfect registrations, led to a most enjoyable experience in a very difficult acoustic. Did I mention that the room is also very dry? There was not even the hint of vermouth to be found ! The program was: Fantasy and Fugue in G minor, BWV 5642 - Bach "O Mensch, bewein dein Sunde Gross", BWV 622 - Bach Sonata in D minor, Op.65, No. 2, Mendelssohn Fantasy in F minor, K. 608 - Mozart (Intermission) Fantasy and Fugue on "Ad nos, ad salutarem undam" - Liszt None of this music was new to me and, in fact, I have heard Felix play all of it on multiple instruments, so this was an opportunity to hear what Felix would do with a very difficult instrument/acoustic combination. I always learn something at every Felix Hell concert and this was no exception. The lesson on this night was just how differently he approached the repertoire to get the most out of it musically in that space. We talk about "reverberation rate" and "live" versus "dry", well, Field Hall has NO reverberation rate at all and its as dry as a desert. The sound just STOPPED almost before the keys were released. Yet, by his adjustments in articulation, and even basic approach, Felix was able to coax the very best from the music and proved once again that he is the "master of the long line". Although the audience was not huge, there were many recognizable faces in the crowd, including several of Felix=92s professors and Robert Fitzpatrick, Dean of Curtis. It was also nice to talk to Donald Sutherland again, who traveled from Peabody, where Felix will be studying next year. List members Mike Gettleman, from Cleveland, Neil Carlson, from Minnesota, Jack Clotsworthy, and Paul Marchesano were also there as well. Michael Noble from St. Mark=92s Lutheran Church in Hanover, PA was also attended and told us that the new high pressure trumpet recently installed at St. Mark=92s had been placed in honor of Felix=92s graduation from Curtis and is named the "Hellvecian Trumpet=92. This is the church where Virgil Fox was the organist in 1934 and 1935. Following a reception, Olga Hell, very tired from her long trip, retired and Hans led a group of us to a local establishment which served real German beer on tap ! All too quickly, it was time to "hit the road" for the 4-1/2 hour drive back to Central New York. I have heard Felix play better instruments. I have heard Felix play instruments that were, frankly, worse. What made this a memorable performance was Felix=92s "outside the box" approach to achieve very musical results and the marking of major milestone in his developing career.  
(back) Subject: Re: electronic substitutes (kinda long) From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 11:45:49 -0700 (PDT)   YES, the problems with Galanti. Let me say first that this organ was = installed in 1998 1) The display that helps you voice the organ no longer works. No one = wants to come and fix it. 2) THe keyboards have lost their tracker touch. Something inside the = keyboards has broken so now they are like casio keyboards. General music = has told me they have never heard of such a problem. Go figure. 3) The pedal board screw loosen and the bottom of the pedals literally = fall off. I have to retighen the screws every week so this doesn't = happen. I have even had to buy longer screws to put in the holes, because = the wood is stripped. RIght now, three of the pedals are staying together = because i have put a 2 inch screw in and its screwed into the hardwood = floor in the loft. 4) Pistons stick. You push them in and they dont come back out. Some of the sounds are very nice. Thre swell reeds are junk, the 4' = principals are soooo electronic. I suppose it does fill the room. I am = just upset the way the distributor in the United States handles repair = situations. I had tried for almost two years to get the organ fixed, no = luck. I had the display unit replaced once, and within a month it went = bad again. You can't read anything that it says. Luckily I have = memorized everything so I can push buttons and know what is going on. I told Genermusic that maybe I had a defective console   Keys4bach@aol.com wrote: In a message dated 5/1/2004 1:10:50 AM Eastern Standard Time, = montre1978@yahoo.com writes:   play on a Galanti instrument at my church. The instrument is 3 manual, = 50-some stops. I would rather have a 5 stop pipe organ than to use this = instrument. I am currently seeking builders to build a nice 2 manual, = 20-28 stop instrument. I have a small gallery and 4 seconds of acoustic.   if it is well "voiced" that Galanti should sound just fine in there.....   is there a problem with the organ?   dale in FLorida --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
(back) Subject: Re: electronic substitutes (kinda long) From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 11:47:31 -0700 (PDT)   If it is good pipework, it should never bore you. When i was in Germany, = I used to spend hours each day at Cappel just playing the 8' Principal = alone. The voicing is so beautiful, dont know how it would ever get = boring   Steskinner@aol.com wrote:In a message dated 5/1/2004 10:02:46 AM Eastern = Standard Time, Keys4bach@aol.com writes: Steskinner@aol.com writes:   Then, IMO, you would be doing the wrong thing. Nothing bad about a = limited tonal palette you never get tired of, like an 7-8 rank principal = chorus, and a swell division with 2 strings and reeds. One generous 16' = Bourdon, and you've got a marvelous, tho limited, instrument that will = accompany (and perhaps thrill) any congregation for years.     amnd bore the player in 6 months........no thanks.   dale in florida Yes, indeed. That would be a boring player. No fault of the organ. Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA     --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
(back) Subject: Electronic instruments From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 11:53:26 -0700 (PDT)     My goal is not to offend anyone about electronic organs. My church has an = electronic organ and we have sought out builders for a new pipe organ. = The idea was about to happen when the Peoria Diocese started a $35 million = appeal for education, now this organ project has been postponed. (my = church has to donate around one million to this fund!) I understand having an electronic organ when there is no other possible = means. Id rather have an electronic than a piano I suppose. But when I = see churches getting these huge 4-5 manual electronic organs, it just = seems that money could have been used to start a real pipe organ project. Just my two cents       Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St Champaign, IL 61820 217-390-0158 www.scottmontgomerymusic.net --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
(back) Subject: Choral music for sale From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 12:06:49 -0700   Daniel Pinkham - Easter Cantata=20 published by C.F. Peters. (P06393) vocal score 40 copies (in excellent condtion) Current market price is $4.75 a copy, will sell all 40=20 for $80   Jonathan Orwig  
(back) Subject: Re: electronic substitutes (kinda long) From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 14:51:15 -0500   Hi Dale, What I am talking about is a digital piano being used instead of a = Steinway "D" in a concert setting by a Steinway artist or like caliber = artist in a symphony hall.   James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Artisan of Wood WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Keys4bach@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 9:05 AM Subject: Re: electronic substitutes (kinda long)     In a message dated 5/1/2004 9:02:15 AM Eastern Standard Time, = pianoman@accessus.net writes:     tell my clients that we will know when the digital pianos are = arrived when they will be used=20     Have you heard General Music's Pro Mega 3?   just got one to repalce my church's acoustic because it has something = called physical modeling and sounds like a Steinway 9', a Fazioli 10' = and more than enough other stuff to satisfy the happy clappy Jesus music = people.   dale in florida  
(back) Subject: St. Ita's long ago From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 01 May 2004 15:52:47 -0400   On 5/1/04 2:14 PM, "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> wrote:   > The only time I heard this [St. Ita's Church] organ live was back around = 1958 > when Gaston Litaize gave a recital there.   You think YOU're old! I visited that church one day in June 1955, on my first visit to that city. I was looking more at architecture than organs, at that time, so didn't know what I was missing!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Ita's long ago From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 16:07:24 -0500   No, I don't think I'm old, thank you very much. Sensitive? Yeah. I was merely making a statement about the one and only time I was at St. Ita's. = If I were old, I wouldn't be learning, on average, two new works a week; and I'm sick to think how many truly young organists and middle-aged organists and, of course, older organists are so proud of recycling their meager holdings and smugly reporting to these organ lists that nobody knows the difference. For starters, THEY know it and GOD knows it. One can always = find time to do what one wants to do, so I don't buy into the idea that a = person is just too busy to add to one's repertory. Busy people somehow find time = to do even more things than unbusy people do.   I suppose if I were old, I'd be too feeble or sick or stupid to play well. Sorry, but I don't have these problems ... yet. I even play recitals. = Fancy that. Tomorrow for church I'm playing Erland von Koch's Sicilienne and = Egil Hovland's Preludium in c# for prelude pieces and Albert Renaud's Toccata = in D Minor (not for the timid organist, believe me) for a postlude. I thought = I was going to play excerpts from Wilhelm Rudnick's Easter Fantasy, Op. 52, but when I tried it out in earnest on the organ last Wednesday, I realized that Rudnick was a nudnick, and I had to scramble for something worthwhile to replace what I had planned. If I were like an awful lot of organists I know, I'd just say "too bad--that's what I was planning on, so that's what they'll get." You can be sure that your congregation will pick up on the fact that you're playing boring music and it will be a race to the finish = to find out who was less interested: the listener or the note-pusher.   I suppose if I were old, I couldn't improvise or compose. Sorry, try = again. Forty of my recent compositions have been/will be published in the year 2004.   Who's old? Thankfully, not THIS kid! Try again some other day!!   Yesterday I went shopping in various malls, parked far enough away from = the buildings to get in some extra walking, and was able to locate my car without hesitation (and not because it was sitting out there in isolation some 5 blocks away). I just hope I remember how to get to church tomorrow morning. :-)   Bob Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 2:52 PM Subject: St. Ita's long ago   > You think YOU're old! I visited that church one day in June 1955, on my > first visit to that city. I was looking more at architecture than = organs, > at that time, so didn't know what I was missing! > > Alan      
(back) Subject: RE: pipes and bang for your bucks From: "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 01 May 2004 16:31:56 -0500   Well, I for one would love to see a genuine Ruffatti somewhere within driving distance so I can experience one up close and personal and see for =   myself just what that particular SOUND really sounds like. Desiree, you = in a position of influence here that could affect the musical life of the = city of Chicago for many years to come. Either an instrument by those Italians =   or one by any of the builders on this list (Gluck, Schneider, Quimby, who else?) could be qutie a happening.   As long as carpet is either non-existant or kept to a minimum, I am convinced that a pipe organ can be designed to overcome any reasonable acoustical challenge. Is it possible to make use of the long axis of the room even though it's transverse? Perhaps the main organ in this wise and =   the Choir (with a Pedal Bourdon co-located) in the front?   At least you can HEAR your instrument. I get to sit under an 8' ceiling = and hear sound coming from around the corner. Fortunately the console is moveable for recitals and such. It's quite a difference when I'm able to come out from under. Our building seats 300, although it's never more = than 1/4 filled on any given Sunday, and the nave is 45' in height. The = console is normally docked opposite the pulpit under the low-ceiling part, and the =   chior sits in another part of the "cave" under where the organ is = installed, with a sound vent over their heads. The Choir division has an extra set = of shades opening just above this vent. It actually works now that we got = them to actually sit under the hole!   BTW, the recital has been bumped up to the 16th of May due to a nearly forgotten wedding booked for the 23rd (no music). That's a Sunday = afternoon at 2pm.   jim   O):^)   _________________________________________________________________ Mother=92s Day is May 9. Make it special with great ideas from the = Mother=92s Day Guide! http://special.msn.com/network/04mothersday.armx