PipeChat Digest #4476 - Sunday, May 2, 2004
 
Small instruments and boring playing.
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
RE: What Dale is saying in "boring" is.
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Gottfried help
  by <Seedlac@aol.com>
Re: Restoration of a Skinner instrument
  by <Swedish5702@aol.com>
Re: Small instruments and boring playing.
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: What time is Cameron in Oak Park?
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
RE: Small instruments and boring playing.
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
 

(back) Subject: Small instruments and boring playing. From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Sun, 2 May 2004 17:46:46 +0100   I think it is the mark of a master-organist that they can get a lot out = of a little. The first few organs which I learned on were tiny by American standards - but the wise old gentlemen who taught me made a point of explaining how you can get a whole lot more out of the "boring little instrument" by some clever playing techniques. E.g. many stops, because = of the way they are scaled, have an entirely different "character" in the lowest two octaves, the middle octave, and the upper two octaves - so, = for example, one can get an entirely new "stop" by using a 4 foot flute and playing the solo line an octave or even two octaves lower than written, = down in the tenor register, where it is seldom if ever heard. Making your own "cornet" or "clarinet" by use of partials is another technique which = comes into this category of "getting more for your money" by playing = techniques, although really small organs over here don't have much in the way of partials to play with. I'm not sure if I'm really explaining what I mean = but - whatever!   =20   What I'm really getting at is that it probably takes a lot more skill, thought and planning, to get something exciting and musical from a = typical English Parish Church organ, with a specification something like the following, than it does from an enormous American Organ with 3 manuals = and 70 or 80 ranks.   =20   Will's made-up typical English Parish Church Organ: (Tony - please = correct me if I'm wrong about this!)   =20   Pedal:   Bourdon 16   Bass Flute 8   =20   Great:   Open Diapason 8   Stopped Diapason 8   Gamba 8   Principal 4   Flute 4   Fifteenth 2   Trumpet 8   =20   Swell:   Open Diapason 8   Lieblich Gedact 8   Echo Gamba 8   Voix Celeste 8   Gemshorn 4   Piccolo 2   Cornopean 8   =20   Couplers:   Swell to Pedal   Great to Pedal   Swell to Great   =20   2 combination pedals to Great (not adjustable)   2 combination pedals to Swell (not adjustable)   =20   Actually, looking at this, I think I've probably gone overboard, and = made this much too comprehensive a specification to be a true "average" = Anyway, just have a look at our NPOR to see the true state of affairs.   =20   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Keys4bach@aol.com Sent: 02 May 2004 03:05 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: electronic substitutes (kinda long)   =20   In a message dated 5/1/2004 12:02:40 PM Eastern Standard Time, Steskinner@aol.com writes:         Yes, indeed. That would be a boring player. No fault of the organ. =20       cannot let this one sit here.   you can only wring so much out of something. At that point I THE PLAYER would be bored............the fault of the organ is that it is limited = and can only be wrung out so much. I had a 26 rank Austin, nothing nice = about it and after 6 months i cried when i thought about how to program a DIFFERENT recital every year.   i rented electronics for ALL major choral works except Vivaldi's Gloria. = It was PERFECT for that piece.   BTW, i have heard broing playing on large organs too.   <G> dale in florida      
(back) Subject: RE: What Dale is saying in "boring" is. From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Sun, 2 May 2004 17:46:46 +0100   I believe that scientific research or theory or something tells us that = it is 4 foot tone which the congregation uses to "hear" the tune rather = than the 8 ft Diapason or Gamba or Flute or whatever. Certainly if my congregation is a bit sluggish, I find slapping on some 2 ft stuff = brightens things up and the singing revives like a drowning man given a whiff of oxygen! I make it a policy never to introduce a tune using just 8 ft = tone - nothing less than Diapason 8 plus Principal 4 when playing over with 4 = part harmony. Of course, if it is some really well known tune, which doesn't = need any introduction really, I sometimes will just play the melody on a reed = or something.   =20   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of T.Desiree' Hines Sent: 01 May 2004 23:44 To: PipeChat Subject: What Dale is saying in "boring" is.   =20   What Dale is referring to with a a modest organ boring the play is = this...To play repertoire with a splash with of Tobasco sauce, limited tonal = palatw will not cut it. Of couse good pipe work is a necessity for any good = organ.   SNIP=20   I would like to know something. What does one do to stir a congregation = to sing at the organ?=20   SNIP   I respect ones desire and love for 8' principals...as I do the same = thing. I can sit for hours with once nice clear 8' flute and have a field = day...but my congregation is not filled with graduates of some Program in the = Study of Organ Music from ABC Conservatory. Tho some have, they usually studied = at places where the formost Chicago organists were teaching.   =20   From Desiree'=20 T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 =20      
(back) Subject: Re: Gottfried help From: <Seedlac@aol.com> Date: Sun, 2 May 2004 13:17:49 EDT   Alan: Good to hear from you. I was afraid that no one out there has worked on a Gottfried. Is this stringer a board running the length of the chest, for each rank, = and a well bored in it for the pouch? I wonder if an older Barnes book might = show the chest design. Your description gives me pause that the problem is most =   likely splits in the rubber cloth. These odd ball chest designs seem to = always show their problems in the most impossible to areas to correct. The church = in question is the Universalist church on 16th St. Washington, DC. It is a = very odd organ design and one that follows those found in Midmer-Losh instruments. Sadly it was installed in a chamber that should hold 1/2 as much organ. Accessibility to many areas is near, if not totally impossible. I will = assess the situation Wednesday, and will let you know if I need help. Steve  
(back) Subject: Re: Restoration of a Skinner instrument From: <Swedish5702@aol.com> Date: Sun, 2 May 2004 13:26:25 EDT   Hello:   I have been asked on behalf of the organ committee to search for a firm = that does restoration work on EM Skinner instruments.   The instrument was a beautiful 2-18 until Moller rebuilt it and took out = the lovely French Horn...Vox Humana...Flugel Horn...and several ranks of = simply soothing strings and turned it into a harsh and quite frankly boring = sounding instrument.   I greatly appreciate any and all help in this matter.   Best, Craig    
(back) Subject: Re: Small instruments and boring playing. From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 2 May 2004 10:26:41 -0700 (PDT)     Will Light wrote the following:   What I=92m really getting at is that it probably takes a lot more skill, = thought and planning, to get something exciting and musical from a typical = English Parish Church organ, with a specification something like the = following, than it does from an enormous American Organ with 3 manuals = and 70 or 80 ranks.     Will=92s made-up typical English Parish Church Organ: (Tony =96 please = correct me if I=92m wrong about this!)     Pedal:   Bourdon 16   Bass Flute 8     Great:   Open Diapason 8   Stopped Diapason 8   Gamba 8   Principal 4   Flute 4   Fifteenth 2   Trumpet 8     Swell:   Open Diapason 8   Lieblich Gedact 8   Echo Gamba 8   Voix Celeste 8   Gemshorn 4   Piccolo 2   Cornopean 8     Couplers:   Swell to Pedal   Great to Pedal   Swell to Great     2 combination pedals to Great (not adjustable)   2 combination pedals to Swell (not adjustable)       Desiree' writes:   That's not a bad stop list. Of course, a mixture and a nice 16 trombone in = the pedal would be a thrill. But, its very similar to my limited tone = palate at Turibius. I just love to use so many colors during the church = service. We have a LOT of music, as most liturgical churches that have = good crowds. Yesterday at both communion masses it took me 2 hymns and = four lyrical pieces to get thru communion.           From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
(back) Subject: Re: What time is Cameron in Oak Park? From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 2 May 2004 10:27:18 -0700 (PDT)   whats his prigram?       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
(back) Subject: RE: Small instruments and boring playing. From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Sun, 2 May 2004 18:51:02 +0100   Oh yes - a pedal Trombone would be very nice, as would a mixture, but I = am trying to give the impression of a "typical" UK parish church organ. The pedal on most of them consists of what my first teacher called "big and little oomph" i.e. a 16 ft Bourdon with an 8ft extension. My example probably oversteps the mark of typicality when I give it a Trumpet on = the Great. More likely to be an ancient Keraulophon or an asthmatic Clarinet = - if indeed there is a reed on the Great at all. I wonder if Tony Newnham, = who works on data entry of the NPOR can tell us what the real "average = English organ" is? My guess is entirely subjective, but drawn from 50 years or = so of compulsive "making a beeline for the organ" every time I look round = an unfamiliar church.   =20   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of T.Desiree' Hines Sent: 02 May 2004 18:27 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Small instruments and boring playing.   =20   Will Light wrote the following:   What I'm really getting at is that it probably takes a lot more skill, thought and planning, to get something exciting and musical from a = typical English Parish Church organ, with a specification something like the following, than it does from an enormous American Organ with 3 manuals = and 70 or 80 ranks.   =20   Will's made-up typical English Parish Church Organ: (Tony - please = correct me if I'm wrong about this!)   =20   Pedal:   Bourdon 16   Bass Flute 8   =20   Great:   Open Diapason 8   Stopped Diapason 8   Gamba 8   Principal 4   Flute 4   Fifteenth 2   Trumpet 8   =20   Swell:   Open Diapason 8   Lieblich Gedact 8   Echo Gamba 8   Voix Celeste 8   Gemshorn 4   Piccolo 2   Cornopean 8   =20   Couplers:   Swell to Pedal   Great to Pedal   Swell to Great   =20   2 combination pedals to Great (not adjustable)   2 combination pedals to Swell (not adjustable)   =20   =20   Desiree' writes:   That's not a bad stop list. Of course, a mixture and a nice 16 trombone = in the pedal would be a thrill. But, its very similar to my limited tone palate at Turibius. I just love to use so many colors during the church service. We have a LOT of music, as most liturgical churches that have = good crowds. Yesterday at both communion masses it took me 2 hymns and four lyrical pieces to get thru communion.=20   =20       From Desiree'=20 T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   _____ =20   Do you Yahoo!? Win <http://pa.yahoo.com/*http:/us.rd.yahoo.com/hotjobs/hotjobs_mail_signatur= e_f ooter_textlink/evt=3D23983/*http:/hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermak= eover > a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs=20      
(back) Subject: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 02 May 2004 12:59:10 -0500   9:30 AM Fourth Sunday of Easter, Year C May 2, 2004 - "Good Shepherd Sunday"   Prelude: 'My Jesus leadeth me' - Johannes Brahms 'Reflection' - Charles Callahan   Processional Hymn: 'Hail, thou long expected Jesus' - 495 (In Babilone) Gloria in excelsis - S 280 (Powell) Sequence Hymn: 'Lord, enthroned in heavenly splendor' - 307 (omit 2, 3)(Bryn Calfaria) Offertory Hymn: 'The King of love my shepherd is' - 646 (Dominus regit me) Doxology - 380, v. 3 Sanctus - S 129 (Powell) Agnus Dei - S 157 (Merbecke) Communion Hymns: 'Shepherd of souls, refresh and bless' - 343 (St. Agnes) 'All people that on earth do dwell' - 377 (Old Hundredth) Recessional Hymn: 'Savior, like a shepherd lead us' - 708 (Sicilian Mariners)   Postlude: Little Fugue in G minor - J. S. Bach     Well, God spoke plainly to me again today, and not just through today's Gospel. He reminded me of the last time he spoke plainly to me, and about all the drawbacks of being a church organist.   I had had several almost dreamy substitute gigs over the last couple years - decent instruments, decent choirs, low level of responsibility for choosing the music other than my own solos. That all changed today.   I spent so much time in preparation, wanting everything to go just right. After the person who was supposed to help guide me did not materialize, I chose hymns and service music and e-mailed them to the church secretary Wednesday night. I also called her home and left a message to call me if there were any problems or if she didn't receive the post. I heard nothing until Saturday morning, when she called and said she had never received the e-mail. So I gave her the hymns over the phone. My 'guide' called late Saturday evening while I was out - so much for help.   I arrived at the church at 8:00 to prepare for the 9:30 service. Junior warden was already there, and piddling with the organ. Bad sign. Then I started warming up - all my registrations were gone! All of them! Pistons 1, 3 and 6 showed some weird registration, but nothing of mine was left. I had spent my lunch hour Tuesday selecting them, took Rick with me Wednesday evening to check balance and volume, and even tweaked them down on Thursday. Although I knew generally what I had programmed, I HAD NOT WRITTEN IT DOWN!   In the middle of reconstructing my registrations some strange little woman kept interrupting me with questions. When I politely explained that I was having to quickly recreate registrations for the service, she left, but came back and wanted to know when we were having choir practice. The last word I had received from anyone in this church was that the choir was disbanded. She explained to me that people wanted it quiet in the church before service - it was 45 minutes before service, and there was not a soul in the church!   Having set something similar to what I thought I had and deciding that I would have to come sometime before dawn if I wanted to warm up in peace for a 9:30 service, I followed her into the fellowship hall, where I met the choir for the first time. We sat down before a "practice organ", which looked all the world like a baby Wurlitzer, with two tiny keyboards, and a one-octave pedalboard. It had a beautiful little finish, and a cute little horseshoe console. The choir had practiced nothing for an anthem, but wanted to sing something anyway. The bulletin showed no choir anthem, but there was an offertory hymn. They decided they would sing that. There was exactly one person out of the six that could read music, and two that could carry a tune.   Satisfied they knew the hymns and service music, I made my way to the church to start the prelude.   This is one of my favorite Brahms chorales - don't know why. I thought I was getting along really well, and the organ was not switching to sudden full registration on me, when someone walked in and turned on all the ceiling fans, and my music started flying away. Somehow I managed to play the Brahms with one hand, and in those moments when I needed two hands I used my nose to hold the music down, and yes, I did whisper a legal term. GUESS I NEED TO GLUE COPIES TO CARDBOARD OR FOLDERS!   The rest of the service went swimmingly well for me and the awful little Baldwin, except that the senior warden introduced me as the new organist (I've only agreed to fill in four Sundays for them, and made that clear to the treasurer and priest).   I made it through most of the postlude before whole notes started giving out on me. That would have been OK, except that I was listening to myself, and it threw me. The E flat in the treble either sounded late or not at all, and suddenly I was having trouble with one of the bass pedal notes (at this point I neither remember nor care which one). I was so thankful to make it through.   Then some lady came up and introduced herself as the former organist, two organists ago. She had no organ training, only piddling with the piano. She had to give it up because she had broken her arm. However, her arm was completely healed, and I asked her why didn't she want the job back. She pointed to the organ and called it a monster, and said she could never do anything with the choir. Then she proceeded to tell me how the organ was too loud, particularly for the "choir anthem" (which had of course been registered for soft congregation and not choir) and to point out all my errors.   I suddenly didn't hear anything else she said, because God was nudging me in the ribs and saying, "Remember?" Yeah, yeah, yeah. I drove all the way home with sore sides.   So all your talk about bad organs is pretty wasted on me - like Justice Potter Stewart on obscenity, I know it when I see it, and I've played it and met the former incumbent from hell.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com RULE #5 for lawyers: A real emergency costs twice the going hourly rate, and a contrived emergency three times the rate.        
(back) Subject: RE: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Sun, 2 May 2004 20:18:40 +0100   Fine music Glenda! But are you going back there again? I know I = wouldn't. I'd tell them that they didn't deserve a musician when they treat people like that. I would give them a list of what was wrong, and tell them to = fix it before I would play for them. Then I would leave. If you just knuckle down and do your four weeks, they will expect you to stay for ever. They will assume that everything is fine and carry on the same way. I was asked to sub at a large church near me a few years ago. They had = just refurbished the sanctuary and put a large screen immediately behind the organ console which was at the front of the church, behind the platform = and the altar. This screen was so tall that when I looked in the various = mirrors etc. on the organ, I couldn't see anything at all. I played the service, = not knowing whether there were 15 or 150 or 1500 in the congregation. I = couldn't tell when the offering was being presented, except by straining my ears = to listen for footsteps. I started playing 30 minutes or so before the = service to get used to the organ. Nobody was present. After my postlude I = emerged. Nobody was present. I felt I had been playing in a total vacuum. = Afterwards they were full of fulsome praise for my playing, and said, "You will = come again?" I said, "not until you cut down that screen thing" Three weeks = later they rang me up - "Will you play again?" Me: "Have you taken the screen away?" Them: "No" Me:"Then I won't play for you. I told you what I = thought about it." Them: "OH". About a month later: "Will you play for us?" Me: "Have you lowered the screen?" Them: "Yes" Me: "OK - I'll play" Sure = enough they had cut down the height of the screen so I could see over the top = of it. Problem solved. I sub there now quite regularly, when I'm available. That's what happens when you stick to your guns. If they complain when = you withdraw from playing, just say, "Ask the previous organist why she = doesn't want to play any more".   Will Light Coventry UK     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Glenda Sent: 02 May 2004 18:59 To: 'PipeChat' Subject: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet   9:30 AM Fourth Sunday of Easter, Year C May 2, 2004 - "Good Shepherd Sunday"   Prelude: 'My Jesus leadeth me' - Johannes Brahms 'Reflection' - Charles Callahan   Processional Hymn: 'Hail, thou long expected Jesus' - 495 (In Babilone) Gloria in excelsis - S 280 (Powell) Sequence Hymn: 'Lord, enthroned in heavenly splendor' - 307 (omit 2, 3)(Bryn Calfaria) Offertory Hymn: 'The King of love my shepherd is' - 646 (Dominus regit me) Doxology - 380, v. 3=20 Sanctus - S 129 (Powell) Agnus Dei - S 157 (Merbecke) Communion Hymns: 'Shepherd of souls, refresh and bless' - 343 (St. Agnes) 'All people that on earth do dwell' - 377 (Old Hundredth) Recessional Hymn: 'Savior, like a shepherd lead us' - 708 (Sicilian Mariners)   Postlude: Little Fugue in G minor - J. S. Bach     Well, God spoke plainly to me again today, and not just through today's Gospel. He reminded me of the last time he spoke plainly to me, and about all the drawbacks of being a church organist. =20   I had had several almost dreamy substitute gigs over the last couple years - decent instruments, decent choirs, low level of responsibility for choosing the music other than my own solos. That all changed today.   I spent so much time in preparation, wanting everything to go just right. After the person who was supposed to help guide me did not materialize, I chose hymns and service music and e-mailed them to the church secretary Wednesday night. I also called her home and left a message to call me if there were any problems or if she didn't receive the post. I heard nothing until Saturday morning, when she called and said she had never received the e-mail. So I gave her the hymns over the phone. My 'guide' called late Saturday evening while I was out - so much for help.   I arrived at the church at 8:00 to prepare for the 9:30 service. Junior warden was already there, and piddling with the organ. Bad sign. Then I started warming up - all my registrations were gone! All of them! Pistons 1, 3 and 6 showed some weird registration, but nothing of mine was left. I had spent my lunch hour Tuesday selecting them, took Rick with me Wednesday evening to check balance and volume, and even tweaked them down on Thursday. Although I knew generally what I had programmed, I HAD NOT WRITTEN IT DOWN! =20   In the middle of reconstructing my registrations some strange little woman kept interrupting me with questions. When I politely explained that I was having to quickly recreate registrations for the service, she left, but came back and wanted to know when we were having choir practice. The last word I had received from anyone in this church was that the choir was disbanded. She explained to me that people wanted it quiet in the church before service - it was 45 minutes before service, and there was not a soul in the church!   Having set something similar to what I thought I had and deciding that I would have to come sometime before dawn if I wanted to warm up in peace for a 9:30 service, I followed her into the fellowship hall, where I met the choir for the first time. We sat down before a "practice organ", which looked all the world like a baby Wurlitzer, with two tiny keyboards, and a one-octave pedalboard. It had a beautiful little finish, and a cute little horseshoe console. The choir had practiced nothing for an anthem, but wanted to sing something anyway. The bulletin showed no choir anthem, but there was an offertory hymn. They decided they would sing that. There was exactly one person out of the six that could read music, and two that could carry a tune.   Satisfied they knew the hymns and service music, I made my way to the church to start the prelude.   This is one of my favorite Brahms chorales - don't know why. I thought I was getting along really well, and the organ was not switching to sudden full registration on me, when someone walked in and turned on all the ceiling fans, and my music started flying away. Somehow I managed to play the Brahms with one hand, and in those moments when I needed two hands I used my nose to hold the music down, and yes, I did whisper a legal term. GUESS I NEED TO GLUE COPIES TO CARDBOARD OR FOLDERS!   The rest of the service went swimmingly well for me and the awful little Baldwin, except that the senior warden introduced me as the new organist (I've only agreed to fill in four Sundays for them, and made that clear to the treasurer and priest).   I made it through most of the postlude before whole notes started giving out on me. That would have been OK, except that I was listening to myself, and it threw me. The E flat in the treble either sounded late or not at all, and suddenly I was having trouble with one of the bass pedal notes (at this point I neither remember nor care which one). I was so thankful to make it through.   Then some lady came up and introduced herself as the former organist, two organists ago. She had no organ training, only piddling with the piano. She had to give it up because she had broken her arm. However, her arm was completely healed, and I asked her why didn't she want the job back. She pointed to the organ and called it a monster, and said she could never do anything with the choir. Then she proceeded to tell me how the organ was too loud, particularly for the "choir anthem" (which had of course been registered for soft congregation and not choir) and to point out all my errors.   I suddenly didn't hear anything else she said, because God was nudging me in the ribs and saying, "Remember?" Yeah, yeah, yeah. I drove all the way home with sore sides.   So all your talk about bad organs is pretty wasted on me - like Justice Potter Stewart on obscenity, I know it when I see it, and I've played it and met the former incumbent from hell.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com RULE #5 for lawyers: A real emergency costs twice the going hourly rate, and a contrived emergency three times the rate.       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" 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