PipeChat Digest #4482 - Wednesday, May 5, 2004
 
RE: Buffalo's Houses of Worship on DVD and VHS
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
VERY bad organ!(somewhat long but still interesting)
  by "Tom R" <trackeraction@theatreorgans.com>
Virgil Fox -- New CD
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
RE: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Buffalo's Houses of Worship on DVD and VHS From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 04 May 2004 06:49:03 -0500   If we go to the OHS convention this year, will we see them all?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of William T. Van Pelt     "Buffalo's Houses of Worship" is an excellent TV documentary which has been seen on PBS stations nationally at the option of each local station. The documentary is now available on DVD or on VHS videotape from OHS at the beginning of the opening page at http://www.ohscatalog.org   The documentary was introduced nationally in April 2004 and describes 16 churches in Buffalo, New York, with fine photography, discussions of outstanding architecture, LaFarge, Tiffany, and other glass, and several organ demonstrations: St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral (Hope-Jones/Schlicker & Choir of Men & Boys); St. Joseph's Cathedral (1876 E. & G. G. Hook & Hastings 4m, built for the U. S. Centennial Exhibition, Philadelphia); St. Stanislaus; St. Louis; Trinity Episcopal; First Presbyterian, Unitarian Universalist, Holy Trinity Lutheran (M=F6ller/Kegg 152 ranks), St. Gerard's, Blessed Trinity RC, Our Lady of Victory Basilica, Temple Beth Zion, and a few more which have been preserved through adaptive reuse.        
(back) Subject: VERY bad organ!(somewhat long but still interesting) From: "Tom R" <trackeraction@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 4 May 2004 13:18:44 -0400   Hello, all,   I have been following the thread on bad organs and couldn't help but chime in with the situation I am currently involved in. I think that the organ = I play definitely qualifies under the heading of "bad organ".   Here's the stoplist: GREAT 8' Open Diapason(Austin) 8' Stop'd Diapason(SW) 8' Viole d'Orchestre(SW) 8' Dulciana(SW?) 4' Prestant(1970's addition) 4' Harmonic Flute(SW) 2' Fifteenth(1970's addition) 1' Octave(1970's addition) 8' Trumpet(1970's addition) 4' Trumpet(ext. from 8') Gt to Gt 16, UO, 4 Sw to Gt 16, 8, 4   SWELL 8' Gross Flute(Austin) 8' Stop'd Diapason(Austin) 8' Viole d'Orchestre(Austin) 8' Viole Celeste(Austin) 8' Echo Salizional(Austin) 8' Dulciana(Austin) 4' Harmonic Flute(Austin) 8' Trumpet(Gt) 4' Trumpet(Gt) Sw to Sw 16, UO, 4   PEDAL 16' Bourdon(Austin) 16' Dulciana(ext. of Gt 8') Gt to Pd 8, 4 Sw to Pd 8, 4   The organ is listed as Austin Op#808 in the opus list in Orpha Ochse's = book on Austin organs. The console is a Klann console, presumably added in the late 70's at the same time as the pipe additions. The whereabouts of the original console are unknown. The current console is quite unreliable, especially the combination action. Just recently, the 4' Prestant decided it no longer wanted to be included on any preset piston. When a piston is activated that is set to engage the stop, the stop tab comes down halfway and pops right back up. Sometimes setting one combination piston changes all combination pistons for the division, or the generals if you were setting a general. A modest restoration effort has been undertaken by the local repairperson. Currently, the restoration has entailed making the = key action inside the console solid state(but not the pistons . . . grrr), replacing a very old blower that stopped working with a newer, smaller, 3 phase blower from Germany(Laukhauff?), removal and cleaning of all pipes, releathering of two offset chests, one of which holds the great principals 4, 2, and 1, the other holding the 8+4 unit trumpet. Also, the electrical linkage between the console and the trumpet was reconnected after having been disconnected by a former pastor some 20 years ago because of a nearly deaf organist who supposedly used it too much. Plans are now underway to releather the Great and Swell chests, which will require the organ not be used until that work is completed(which means that I'll be playing the Clavinova for much of the summer and probably into the fall). The item in the bulletin stated that each primary will take 10 days to releather, does that sound right to you organ techs out there? Now some details of each = of the ranks that I need to mention:   8' Open Diapason - Fairly typical, early twentieth century American diapason. Rich tone, no chiff, not a great deal of harmonic overtones, = but no leathered lips or anything like that. Only problem with it is a = buzzing sound on one or two of the bass pipes in the facade. 8' Stopped Diapason - Stop tab listed on the great does not function, however, it plays from the swell. Much softer than the Gross Flute, and seems to have a hint of reediness, like that of a clarinet. Top 2 octaves frequently out of tune. 4' Prestant, 2' Fifteenth, 1' Octave - Very screechy, neo-baroqueish upperwork added in the 70's. It is unclear whether the fifteenth is a seperate full compass rank or an extention of the prestant. The octave is definitely derived from the fifteenth and breaks back in the top octave. The fifteenth and the octave have many dead notes and have cyphered many times in the past. The octave is especially unplesant and it is unclear = to me why they added that rather than a lower pitched mixture, which would = have made more sense if more upperwork was desired, especially considering the fact that the organ is in a rather large, but acoustically dead room, due primarily to the fact that acoustic tiling was moulded to the arched = gothic vaulted ceiling!!!!!! 8' Trumpet - This thing is nothing short of hideous! It was only recently reconnected and I already wish it would be disconnected again!! The best description I can give of this rank is to compare it to either geese with = a horrible intestinal disease or semi-tuned car horns, each from different makes and models of cars. It is unusable as a chorus reed because it is = too loud to blend with the principals and the only use I can ever find for it = is an occasional solo on the swell accompanied by the great principals. It will not stay in tune even with itself for more than 1 day, and several of the notes are either very slow to speak, do not speak at all, or make strange noises rather than musical notes. 8' Gross Flute - Very full bodied, smooth, LOUD flute. It is rather = coarse in places however and has tuning issues at times. 8' Viole d'Orchestre and Celeste - I rather like this stop. It is a very keen, very reedy string, almost sounds like an oboe in miniature. The celeste, however, is rarely tuned properly and when combined together they start to sound like a badly tuned reed organ or accordion. 8' Dulciana - This stop is almost too quiet to be heard, especially when people are in the building coughing and whispering as they do. Several notes in this rank do not speak properly or at all, some sound as if they are overblowing to the octave. The stop tab for this in the swell also = seems to engage the stop'd diapason for some reason!? 8' Echo Salizional - If the dulciana is almost too soft to be heard, this thing is inaudible. You'd need a miracle ear for this one! From what I = can tell, this stop has similar problems as the dulicana far as improper = speech and dead notes. 4' Harmonic Flute - Actually, a very pretty little stop, very sweet and clear. Some overblowing on a few notes however. 16' Bourdon - Rarely in tune, more like a breeze than a sound in the = lowest octave. 16' Dulciana - Most useful pedal stop(of the two), has a little bit more power and definition to the sound in the lowest octave. Cyphers often though.   Also, I should mention that until the releathering takes place, the swell = is riddled with dead notes, especially in the lowest octave(the entire low octave is almost completely dead). In order to get any use out of = anything off of the swell, I must couple to the Great and add at least one or two great stops to fill in the gaps. The pneumatic motor for the swell shades = is also shot and is going to be replaced with a solid-state mechanical motor during the releathering. For now, however, the swell is permanently = wedged open regardless of what position the pedal is in. Honestly, I really feel that this organ is going to be nothing but trouble down the road. There = has been too much patchwork done to this organ in the past and all this "restoration" has been thus far is more patchwork. Every time one thing = is fixed, 10 more things break. There might have been hope for this organ = had the church gone with a reputable company, especially Austin since this was originally one of their organs, but the pastor is more concerned with = dollar signs than quality, and I will say this is all getting done VERY cheaply(from what I've heard between 15-20K TOTAL!). You get what you pay for, unfortunately. Also, even if the organ worked properly, I find it a bit sparse for the size of the church, but that's just my opinion. In = this situation, an Allen looks better and better to me every day that passes. = At least with that I can get the big organ sounds that I want. They have mixtures, 16' manual stops, AND reeds at 16', 8', and 4' if you really = want them. Sounds better to me than this cheaply rebuilt patchwork mutt. But = the pastor and the head organist(who doesn't know what all those buttons do, BTW) are dead set on having this organ "restored". At least I get to play = a perfectly decent and suitable Allen R230 at the other church I play for! Not that I have anything against pipes, just bad ones. Anyway, that's my little situation. Hope you enjoyed hearing about this one, despite the legnth and happy chatting!   Tom Rishel      
(back) Subject: Virgil Fox -- New CD From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Tue, 4 May 2004 13:30:26 -0400   The first CD release of Virgil Fox's legendary recordings made at age 29 = on the E. M. Skinner organ at Girard College, Philadelphia, in 1941 for RCA Victor are available at http://www.ohscatalog.org   The recordings are digitally remastered and include four pieces that were not released by RCA on 78 rpm shellac.    
(back) Subject: RE: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 04 May 2004 18:47:10 -0500   Great idea re the rumor - I may try that.   What do you do if you have music some of which is portrait and some landscape? Do they have those clear plastic thingees in landscape at Walmart? Need to check that out. I'm not crazy about loose-leaf notebooks - guess because attorneys use them so much. But the clear thingees may add enough weight by themselves to resist the wind.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Myosotis51@aol.com   I use a looseleaf notebook with clear plastic sleeves. If I'm feeling ambitious, I have all the service music copied and in order so there's no shuffling.        
(back) Subject: Re: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 4 May 2004 19:58:45 -0400   if you use the clear plastic sheet protectors -- MAKE SURE THEY'RE THE NON-REFLECTIVE TYPE. nothing worse than having the glare or reflection = from an overhead light bouncing off the sheet into your eyes.! Tom Hoehn, Organist Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes, Ellenton, FL (substitute - 4/42 Wurlitzer) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL (4/9?- = Rodgers/Ruffati/Wicks) Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS/VotS-ATOS/DTOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOUploads/ ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, May 04, 2004 7:47 PM Subject: RE: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet     > Great idea re the rumor - I may try that. > > What do you do if you have music some of which is portrait and some > landscape? Do they have those clear plastic thingees in landscape at > Walmart? Need to check that out. I'm not crazy about loose-leaf > notebooks - guess because attorneys use them so much. But the clear > thingees may add enough weight by themselves to resist the wind. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > Myosotis51@aol.com > > I use a looseleaf notebook with clear plastic sleeves. If I'm feeling > ambitious, I have all the service music copied and in order so there's > no shuffling. > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 00:55:16 EDT   Hello gksjd85@direcway.com,     In reference to your comment: Do they have those clear plastic thingees in landscape at Walmart?   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Not at Walmart, but you can find them at Staples.com or OfficeMax.com. They're called "job ticket holders," and have one center hole - you have = to punch the other two.   The standard "portrait" ones are called "sheet protectors."   They are kinda substantial - most breezes won't send them flying.   Victoria