PipeChat Digest #4483 - Wednesday, May 5, 2004
 
VERY bad organ!(somewhat long but still interesting)
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
RE: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
My Tuesday [Evening] With Sebastian
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net>
May 5th History
  by "Rick" <iplayorgan@comcast.net>
bad organ
  by "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com>
Re: bad organ
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Information on Conn Organ
  by "Lynda Henley" <ginky2000@yahoo.com>
Re: Information on Conn Organ
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
RE: **SPAM** Information on Conn Organ
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Information on Conn Organ
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: bad organ
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
SOURCES FOR WIDOR'S MASS, OPUS 36 (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Information on Conn Organ
  by "Lynda Henley" <ginky2000@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: VERY bad organ!(somewhat long but still interesting) From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 08:13:02 EDT     Sorry to hear about the deteriorated state of your Austin. But it sounds = as if you could have a rather nice organ with some attention. Ten days sounds = very acceptable to releather a primary. It does sound as if you are on the = right track. The organ needs three things. Lots of releathering, a good set of = solid state controls and attention. The buzzing Diapasons pipes are easy to fix = with a few pieces of felt. The Bourdon and Stopped Diapason will come right = back with repacked stoppers and the strings just need re-regualtion possibly = due to sagging languids or dirt in the flues. The Gross Flute most likely needs a = few new tuning scrolls and the caps forming the lower lips have probably = loosened over the years and need to be tightened. The trumpet that laid mute is = simply full of dirt. If the pipes are taken out and given a good cleaning then re-regulated to a softer volume it will probably be much more stable and = usable. The screechy upperwork is a problem that may be made more tolerable by = simply some judicious revoicing. Nicking the flues to allow them to match the = Austin Diapason will certainly help. Klann consoles from that era have rather = notorious plastic parts that break and cause the problems that you described. With = the solid state controls they should be fitting electric stop action magnets = so all of the combination action problems will disappear and you should be = able to get many goodies like multiple levels, transposers, manual transfer, and = all kinds of couplers. One more thing, make sure that you get a new rectifier = in the process. The old "Selenium Stack" rectifiers are notorious for = drooping voltage and AC leakage. Good rectifiers have gotten pretty cheap and the = AC leakage can play havoc with solid state components. Keep your chin up. = There is hope. One of my customers has a similar Austin with similar problems but unfortunately there was much more "hack work" done and the universal = chests were badly damaged and leak like a sieve. They will eventually need all new chests.   All the best:   Alan B "Tech"   Alan A. Binger Organbuilder Inc. Freehold, NJ.    
(back) Subject: RE: Good Shepherd Sunday in a teeny-tiny hamlet From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 08:14:13 -0400   Glenda asked, "What do you do if you have music some of which is portrait and some landscape? Do they have those clear plastic thingees in = landscape at Walmart?"   Glenda,   I still use the clear plastic sleeves even for music printed in = "landscape" orientation. I slip the music into it such that the holes in the sleeve = are "up", and the open end is at the binder edge of the music. Then I use one of the 3-hole punches to punch the bottom two standard holes and insert = the pages into the looseleaf notebook. The "bottom" of this landscape page = will be even with the bottoms of the "portrait" pages; they just won't be tall enough to hit the top ring of the binder. Yes, the outer edges of the = page will stick out of the notebook, but that's the breaks.   A couple things I try to remember: 1. Get the sleeves with the "satin" or "semi-clear" plastic, not the very shiny things. That way, you won't get a glare if somebody turns on a = light that wasn't on during practice. 2. I use sleeves for all my wedding stuff. I'm not a professional; I = don't do well with improv; I can change things quickly, but these sudden changes can be somewhat abrupt. 3. Using the protectors, I can make all kinds of notes using a wax pencil or numerous tiny post-it notes stuck to the protector without having to write on the music. 4. I will note my unwritten repeats, piston changes, stop changes, and = any other reminders on little post-it notes stuck to the pages. 5. Again, the closed up notebook doesn't look as neat with edges of pages protruding from the edge, but it makes my life at the console much easier.   This usually does require one to make copies of one's music. I think = that's OK with copywrite laws if it's for my own personal use.   Hope this helps, Keith      
(back) Subject: My Tuesday [Evening] With Sebastian From: "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net> Date: Wed, 05 May 2004 09:49:31 -0400   To those of us who do not know about this, Tuesdays with Sebastian - The Bach Keyboard Project a cycle of 34 concerts on selected dates from October, 2003 through May, 2005. Christa Rakich and Peter Sykes play the complete keyboard works of J.S. Bach. Their web site is well worth visiting. www.tuesdayswithsebastian.info .   Although being aware of this project for sometime, this is the first concert I have attended. The concerts and happenings in the Greater Boston area seem to go without notice here, people who go to these concerts should let other people know what they have missed. My thanks to Michael S. Murray at Church of the Redeemer, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts for posting this concert to the lists, as it inspired me to make my way there to hear it.   Last evening, Ms. Rakich and Mr. Sykes played the following, which was the fifteenth concert in the series.   English Suite No. 3 in g minor   Easter Choral Preludes from the Orgelb=FCchlein Christ lag in Todesbanden BWV 625 Jesus Christus, unser Heiland BWV 626 Christ ist erstanden BWV 627 Erstanden is der heilige Christ BWV 628 Eeschienen ist der herrliche Tag BWV 629 Heut' triumphiret Gottes Sohn BWV 630   Pedal-Exercitium BWV 598 Pastorale in F major BWV 590 Toccata in C BWV 566   Ms. Rakich played the harpsichord , provided by Mr. Sykes, but the = builders names escaped me. The suite was brilliantly played on a wonderful = instrument and the acoustic of The Church of the Redeemer only enhanced = the performance.. Bravo Ms. Rakich. Mr. Sykes the performed the rest of = the program on the Noack organ and again my hats off to him for his = skillful and and moving performance of those works. The organ was well suited for = those pieces although a bit of a shock after the beautifully mild tones of = the harpsichord.   My Tuesday Evening with Sebastian was thoroughly enjoyable and made me = regret I have not heard more of these. I recommend this series to you = all. And let's hear more comments on Boston area events I know you are = out there, because I see you and remember not every listener is a Guild = member and there is no central concert listing place in the area.   Cheers, Mack        
(back) Subject: May 5th History From: "Rick" <iplayorgan@comcast.net> Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 09:18:47 -0500     There are many stories related to the sinking of the Titanic. Many have = come to light due to the phenomenal success of the movie.   For example, most people don't know that back in 1912, Hellman's = mayonnaise was manufactured in England. Even fewer know that the Titanic was carrying 12,000 liter-size jars of that popular condiment.   Although the ship sank on April 14, the large mayonnaise shipment was scheduled for delivery on May 5 in Vera Cruz, Mexico, which was to be the next port of call for the great ship after she left New York City.   The Mexican people were eagerly awaiting delivery and were quite disconsolate at the tragic loss. So much so, that they declared a national day of mourning which they, along with many in the U.S., still observe today.   It is known, of course, as Sinko de Mayo   To keep it on topic, I believe there was a pipe organ on-board!   Respectfully, Rick in Joliet, IL      
(back) Subject: bad organ From: "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 05 May 2004 10:08:29 -0500   I encountered a similar mutt once in a Calumet City parish many years ago. = The only way here to get the complete manual/pedal compass to play was to engage every speaking stop, and all the couplers=97in this wise, all the = stops then covered each other's dead notes. Inside the console, most of the contacts had been replaced with guitar string! Not sure where the = pipework had come from. There was one rank in there that had a curious metallic = blue finish.   Not sure what its state is today. They probably got a Lowrey spinet = wailing away by now.   jim   O):^)   _________________________________________________________________ Mother=92s Day is May 9. Make it special with great ideas from the = Mother=92s Day Guide! http://special.msn.com/network/04mothersday.armx    
(back) Subject: Re: bad organ From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 10:28:35 -0500   There seems to be a lot of mixing around here of bad organs due to bad to= nal=20 design, and bad due to wear and tear. Don't confuse these! This is how=20 good organs get thrown away! Sure, many organs have both problems, but t= he=20 wear and tear (rattling pipes, dead notes, unreliable actions, voicing ou= t=20 of regulation) can be dealt with readily. Don't call an organ "bad" for=20 these issues! They can be fixed! Changing a tonal scheme is why many=20 restorations cost a lot of money. The aforementioned Austin has some ton= al=20 issues but almost everything cited for calling it a "bad" organ are thing= s=20 that are very fixable, without major changes. Also true of the "mongrel"= =20 mentioned below. Mechanical problems constitute an organ that needs=20 attention, not a bad organ! Sure, there are organs that are better off=20 being burned to heat organ shops, but just please don't throw away organs= =20 that would be ok with TLC... it ends up costing so much more to start ove= r! =20 And this just convinces the public at large ever more permanently that=20 organs are just plain too expensive to be practical.   Andy       On Wed, 05 May 2004 10:08:29 -0500, james nerstheimer wrote > I encountered a similar mutt once in a Calumet City parish many=20 > years ago. The only way here to get the complete manual/pedal=20 > compass to play was to engage every speaking stop, and all the=20 > couplers=97in this wise, all the stops then covered each other's dead=20 > notes. Inside the console, most of the contacts had been replaced=20 > with guitar string! Not sure where the pipework had come from. =20 > There was one rank in there that had a curious metallic blue finish. >=20 > Not sure what its state is today. They probably got a Lowrey spinet=20 > wailing away by now. >=20 > jim >=20 > O):^) >=20 > _________________________________________________________________ > Mother=92s Day is May 9. Make it special with great ideas from the=20 > Mother=92s Day Guide! http://special.msn.com/network/04mothersday.armx >=20 > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related=20 > topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List:=20 mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org       A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Information on Conn Organ From: "Lynda Henley" <ginky2000@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 08:51:55 -0700 (PDT)   Hello!   I have been lurking on this list for a week hoping to find some information on a newly-acquired free organ I received from a family I know through church, which was the culmination of a life-long dream I have had of owning a home organ. My first organ was a little two and a half octave lap organ with color coded instruction book I had as a child. I have desired an "adult-sized" instrument since the age of 5. I have come to the conclusion that this list is way over my head having been a Music Education major for only 2 years before switching to Psychology. In other words, I am a hobbyist and only recently become one at that!   I have enjoyed reading your discussions and, surprisingly, have learned quite a bit just from the short amount of time I have been lurking, and I was wondering if any of you would be willing to share some basic organ knowledge with me. I had questions about moving the instrument, but it has been moved and is in my house now (on an interior wall which is good for pianos but I have no idea if it makes a difference with an electric organ) and I have a local organ technician I plan to call and give it a look to see what it needs. It has been setting in someone's basement for a few years and is in need of a good cleaning. It is a "tube" organ, Conn Model 542, has a few keys that do not work. I have located a source for an owner's manual on the internet and am waiting for a response to my email and phone call. I just became the winning bidder of a Conn Home Organ Course on eBay which I presume will tell me a lot about which settings to use for desired effects and maybe some practical information, too. I don't know how old it is but I sure don't want to do any damage that hasn't already been done. If any of you can give me some pointers on the proper care and maintenance of such an instrument, I would be grateful. If you are all "purists" and have no such knowledge, if you could point me in the right direction I would appreciate it very much.   Lynda Henley     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover  
(back) Subject: Re: Information on Conn Organ From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 09:02:42 -0700   Hello Lynda,   You might want to post this to the electronics organ list.   It is: EORG-L2pipechat.org, they are more in tune with what you need to know.   If it has been stired for a long period of time, it most likely needs to = be serviced.   The keying buss bars probably need to be cleaned.   So get in contact with your service tech.   Vern   ----- Original Message ----- From: Lynda Henley <ginky2000@yahoo.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, May 05, 2004 8:51 AM Subject: Information on Conn Organ     > Hello! > > I have been lurking on this list for a week hoping to > find some information on a newly-acquired free organ I > received from a family I know through church, which > was the culmination of a life-long dream I have had of > owning a home organ. My first organ was a little two > and a half octave lap organ with color coded > instruction book I had as a child. I have desired an > "adult-sized" instrument since the age of 5. I have > come to the conclusion that this list is way over my > head having been a Music Education major for only 2 > years before switching to Psychology. In other words, > I am a hobbyist and only recently become one at that! > > I have enjoyed reading your discussions and, > surprisingly, have learned quite a bit just from the > short amount of time I have been lurking, and I was > wondering if any of you would be willing to share some > basic organ knowledge with me. I had questions about > moving the instrument, but it has been moved and is in > my house now (on an interior wall which is good for > pianos but I have no idea if it makes a difference > with an electric organ) and I have a local organ > technician I plan to call and give it a look to see > what it needs. It has been setting in someone's > basement for a few years and is in need of a good > cleaning. It is a "tube" organ, Conn Model 542, has a > few keys that do not work. I have located a source for > an owner's manual on the internet and am waiting for a > response to my email and phone call. I just became the > winning bidder of a Conn Home Organ Course on eBay > which I presume will tell me a lot about which > settings to use for desired effects and maybe some > practical information, too. I don't know how old it is > but I sure don't want to do any damage that hasn't > already been done. If any of you can give me some > pointers on the proper care and maintenance of such an > instrument, I would be grateful. If you are all > "purists" and have no such knowledge, if you could > point me in the right direction I would appreciate it > very much. > > Lynda Henley > > > > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs > http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: RE: **SPAM** Information on Conn Organ From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 17:22:11 +0100   Welcome to the group Lynda. There is plenty of expertise about organ = playing on this group, and you are welcome to ask any questions you like. As for = the technicalities of your Conn, you will probably like to join another = Yahoo group called connartists which is entirely populated with Conn owners - = and they have the knowledge when it comes to mending, maintaining and = looking after your Conn. I have a Conn myself at home, a theatre model, and my friend has two - one at home and one installed at the church where I = play the pipe organ. (Yes - he has TWO! He has two because he just sold his = third one!!) You can play all kinds of organ music on your Conn - so stick = around and pick up what you can!!   Will Light Coventry UK     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Lynda Henley Sent: 05 May 2004 16:52 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: **SPAM** Information on Conn Organ   Hello!   I have been lurking on this list for a week hoping to find some information on a newly-acquired free organ I received from a family I know through church, which was the culmination of a life-long dream I have had of owning a home organ. My first organ was a little two and a half octave lap organ with color coded instruction book I had as a child. I have desired an "adult-sized" instrument since the age of 5. I have come to the conclusion that this list is way over my head having been a Music Education major for only 2 years before switching to Psychology. In other words, I am a hobbyist and only recently become one at that!=20   I have enjoyed reading your discussions and, surprisingly, have learned quite a bit just from the short amount of time I have been lurking, and I was wondering if any of you would be willing to share some basic organ knowledge with me. I had questions about moving the instrument, but it has been moved and is in my house now (on an interior wall which is good for pianos but I have no idea if it makes a difference with an electric organ) and I have a local organ technician I plan to call and give it a look to see what it needs. It has been setting in someone's basement for a few years and is in need of a good cleaning. It is a "tube" organ, Conn Model 542, has a few keys that do not work. I have located a source for an owner's manual on the internet and am waiting for a response to my email and phone call. I just became the winning bidder of a Conn Home Organ Course on eBay which I presume will tell me a lot about which settings to use for desired effects and maybe some practical information, too. I don't know how old it is but I sure don't want to do any damage that hasn't already been done. If any of you can give me some pointers on the proper care and maintenance of such an instrument, I would be grateful. If you are all "purists" and have no such knowledge, if you could point me in the right direction I would appreciate it very much.   Lynda Henley     =09 =09 __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs =20 http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover=20 "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Information on Conn Organ From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 12:04:29 -0500   At 9:02 AM -0700 05/05/04, Vern Jones wrote: >Hello Lynda, > >You might want to post this to the electronics organ list. > >It is: EORG-L2pipechat.org, they are more in tune with what you need to >know.   Try EORG-L@pipechat.org   To join send an email to requests@pipechat.org with the following = message:   SUBSCRIBE EORG-L your first and last name   David Who also owns and administers the EORG-L list -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: bad organ From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 10:06:47 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I agree with Andy, but the sort of organs I had in mind were of very dubious build quality or design.   A number of Anneessens organs were imported to the UK from Belgium, and they were a structural disaster, but tonally quite good. (Pipework which folded up on itself, and windchests which started to physically collapse, thus making a re-build an uneconomic proposition against a new or digital instrument).   Others, by UK builders, were incredibly complex and unreliable because of dubious pneumatic actions. Very few builders seem to have the expertise in repairing or re-building them, so one ends up going down the path of a total re-build using EP or even direct electric actions.   I suppose part of the problem was to do with that great Victorian (and Edwardian) interest in all things complex and mechanical. The more complex and the more ingenious the device, the better it was seen to be.   Of course, some companies, such as Norman & Beard, Harrison & Harrison, Binns and others, knew how to make extremely reliable and effective pneumatic actions.   There's a lot to be said for simplicity, such as tracker or barker-lever and, of course, apart from the switching, direct electric actions are fairly straightforward to re-furbish or renew.   I think that one needs to be in the UK to understand why a number of really very fine organs have been lost, purely on economic grounds.....but considering some of the monsters in America, that is probably a silly statement to make!   An organist friend of mine made a very true statement, when he said, "Trackers may rattle eventually, but at least they don't let you down usually. With mechanical action, you know just where you are for the next hundred years or so!"   Oddly enough, it is the old tracker organs which seem to be out-surviving the pneumatic ones in the UK.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK --- Andy Lawrence <andy@ablorgans.com> wrote: > There seems to be a lot of mixing around here of bad > organs due to bad tonal > design, and bad due to wear and tear. Don't confuse > these     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover  
(back) Subject: SOURCES FOR WIDOR'S MASS, OPUS 36 (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 13:45:47 EDT   Hello all   I am looking for information on the following:   "Messe a deux choeurs et deux orgues" Opus 36 Charles Marie Widor, composed in 1878   Does anyone know who publishes this work and where I might be able to get = a copy for study? There are some movements which I would really like to do = with my choir. Any assistance will be greatly appreciated.   Thanks so much. Scott Foppiano, Memphis   Scott F. Foppiano Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.    
(back) Subject: Re: Information on Conn Organ From: "Lynda Henley" <ginky2000@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 11:07:46 -0700 (PDT)   Thank you so much! I'll try them.   Lynda Henley   --- Administrator <admin@pipechat.org> wrote: > At 9:02 AM -0700 05/05/04, Vern Jones wrote: > >Hello Lynda, > > > >You might want to post this to the electronics > organ list. > > > >It is: EORG-L2pipechat.org, they are more in tune > with what you need to > >know. > > Try EORG-L@pipechat.org > > To join send an email to requests@pipechat.org with > the following message: > > SUBSCRIBE EORG-L your first and last name > > David > Who also owns and administers the EORG-L list > -- > **************************************** > David Scribner > Owner / Co-Administrator > PipeChat > > http://www.pipechat.org > mailto:admin@pipechat.org > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover