PipeChat Digest #4507 - Tuesday, May 18, 2004
 
Re: changes in Bach
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: changes in Bach
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Up Close and Personal With Felix Hell (The Recital)
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: The Church of England expands in France
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@sbarker.net>
RE: Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
stories
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: stories
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: stories
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: stories
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
used copy of Finale Allegro 98
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
[Fwd: Re: Finale question]
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Caveat emptor [was Re: used copy of Finale Allegro 98]
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: changes in Bach
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: changes in Bach
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: changes in Bach From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 07:20:47 EDT   In a message dated 5/17/2004 11:34:23 PM Eastern Standard Time, Ray_Ahrens@msn.com writes:   > Organs don't play Bach, organists do. Perhaps it is the run-of-the-mill =   > organist that causes the organ to sound tedious.   You all know this Walcha-ite person would say something. We would all die = if everyone played everything on a (the only?) Plenum on an organ.   Musicality can help anything---witness countless Sunday's on countless bad =   organs where people end up doing Worship through or with the music.   I used to believe i was a conservative. Conserving stuff. (don't go = THERE)! But I do not believe for a minute ANY composer from any era would not = explore what was available to them at that moment. IF JS had hundreds of pistons = I believe he would use them. He would use MIDI (especially on his own transcriptions), and would explore anything else offered.   Truly, there is no correct answer on this fun thread. Thanks to whomever started it.   dale changing keyboards frantically last Sunday on the G Major on a 2 = manual Toaster.......... in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: changes in Bach From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 07:04:42 -0500   I liked this discussion. I have to think, though, that Bach would find it =   absolutely hilarious that we're all worried about "how he would have done it". I think he would be astounded at our technical ability, excited by = our organs, and enthralled with pistons and MIDI. Or would he have been a theatre organist? Maybe he'd listen to a Leslie speaker on a Hammond and say "wow! That's the sound I was looking for all along!!"   Just play his music musically. I dread the day (thank God it will never come) when we all agree on how to play his music, so it sounds the same no =   matter who plays it.   Andy   A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Up Close and Personal With Felix Hell (The Recital) From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 10:55:13 -0400   Before I begin the second installment of this report, it is important to stress the special circumstances that allowed me to have access to the details of this particular recital played by Felix Hell. Plans were made far in advance. This was a venue and an instrument that reasonably permitted the distraction that I may have caused by attending rehearsal, I was present for just a portion of Felix's rehearsal time, and there just happened to be a surplus of rehearsal time for this recital. That is often not the case, and there is no way folks should simply expect access to Felix's rehearsals at other recitals. I am honored to have been permitted to have this experience through the gracious invitation of Felix and Hans Hell. The rehearsal was an eye opening experience for me as I absorbed the complicated process of preparation which was described in the first half of my report. I really just expected to sit back at the recital and enjoy the results of all that preparation. But Felix and Hans had other plans for me. I was instructed to wait until most of the audience had been seated, and then proceed up to a choir pew that positioned me about 5 feet away from where Felix played at the console. The importance of being in this position was, other than Hans, I was the only person of the audience to have an non obscured view of Felix as he played behind the Ruckpositiv. The AGO had set up a video camera and screen to permit the audience to see Felix as he played, and it was set up in the choir pew area opposite from where I sat. Camera viewed from Felix's left, and I had the same view on the right. I was close enough to read the music and felt like a VIP. This position also allowed me to hear this organ in a most unique way. The Ruckpositiv was to my left and the main organ case to my right. I was literally able to hear the different divisions playing either By themselves or in ensemble. The hit of the show though was my understanding of the simple combination system on this instrument with just 6 preset pedals, and watching Felix deal with it as he played. As I reported before, Felix needed to hand register nearly every starting combination before each movement, and do it quickly. I watched in awe as he deftly hit the all cancel pedal at the exact moment of releasing the final notes, and confidently referring to his Post-it notes on the music while pulling out stops, and just as confidently started playing again in mere seconds. The choreography of those movements were as precise and economical as anything I'd ever seen. But, that choreography of setting stops paled to the literal dance that I witnessed as Felix played. One of the most interesting parts of this performance was the nearly constant use of couplers. Being a tracker, the keys of the coupled manual moved right along with the keys being played on the other manuals, so it gave an interesting unobstructed view of what the fingers were doing on the keys. Mundane to an organist I suppose, but thrilling to someone who has never witnessed it. And then there was Felix's facial expressions. He has a definite pattern to this and it is all quite subtle. As he prepares to begin a piece, his look is one of slight tension and appropriate attention as he checks the registration one last time, the swell pedal position, his position on the bench and finally the position of his music on the rack. What happened next rather surprised this non organist. I fully expected Felix would position his hands and feet above the starting notes when in fact his initial move to the instrument comes only at the last moment, and is swift and sure, almost as an attack. This could perhaps be because of the nature of the tracker action, but unless one knows where the music starts, you would not know whether Felix will begin on the pedals or the manuals. Now as the music begins, Felix's facial expression assumes what I would call his "game face". All tension leaves his face, a partial smile appears, and the only change thereafter is the occasional lift of his eyebrows as the music reaches a sustain, and then continues with the return to his original expression. As with any musician, there are certain passages or points in the music that Felix likes especially, and his slight smile grows just a bit at those points. The only other change to his game face come when a passage or chord progression is particularly dynamic and bold or when the passage is impossibly fast. Only then do you see a slight darkening of his eyes, and slight diminishment of smile. It is a look of obvious determination, and it obviously carries him right through, because he never missed a beat. Much has been said pro and con concerning Felix's body movement at the console. I stand firmly on the side of that debate that appreciates what that movement telegraphs to the audience concerning the dynamics of the music, particularly if it's unfamiliar. But what I realized on this day of such close observation is that quite a bit of Felix's movement is required for him to cover the compass of the pedals and the foot controls, all of which on this organ were at the extreme right of the pedals on this organ. There were times when he was playing near the bottom of the manuals and needed a registration change, that his body went past 45 degrees to the bench in order to reach. Even the top of the manuals combined with the bottom of the pedals requires a good deal of body angle. That he makes these movements with a graceful sway of his posture results in a kind of rhythmic movement. When he is playing centered, his posture is straight backed, and the only movement is the occasional slight head nod when the music reaches an explanation point. When I think of those who are well known for their lack of movement at the console such as Felix's one time teacher John Weaver, I also note how tall and big John is, and how much easier it is for him to reach the extremes. In my opinion, much of Felix's movement is required by his stature. But then, I'm no expert, but I sure enjoy Felix's ballet at the console. Most of the observations I have already reported were made early on during the performance. It quickly became apparent that the real show was observing his hands and feet. I saw for the first time the technique of thumbing down. I saw the first glissando from bottom to top on the pedals I had ever witnessed. I saw fingers flying effortlessly at impossibly fast speeds. I saw chords being played on the pedals. I saw pedal passages that made his fingering seem slow in comparison. During bold passages when the organ was near full, I saw constant checking of the swell pedal to make sure it was wide open. As my mind flicked from one detail to the other, I became aware that the individual things I was noticing were being done by Felix all at once. For a man who cannot pat his head and rub his tummy at the same time, this demonstration was astounding. Being close up to this instrument was a real treat as I have mentioned before. Hearing the sounds move around, hearing the action thump, hearing the dynamics of the swell shades opening and closing, and hearing the very slight noise caused as the trackers as they did their work. I could even see some of the mechanism under the top pedals from the side I sat on. It was great fun to hear as Felix opened and retired stops on the fly to create crescendos and diminuendos. Another fun thing was learning to anticipate the sound that Felix had programmed into the 6 preset pedals. Because he changed the presets for the second half of his program, I got to learn them all over again. Most of what Felix played this day was from repertoire familiar to me, and as you might observe from this report, the music was not my focus this day. The first half of his program contained all early music that was well suited to this instrument described in the program as being "mildly unequal". Not having ever heard of this particular temperament, I asked Hans after the program what it meant. I am somewhat familiar with the sounds af alternate temperaments, but this surely sounded equal to me. Hans told me the mutations and perhaps the mixtures were tuned a bit differently, but to his ears the instrument sounded equal as well. In any event it served the Bach, Buxtehuda, and Luebeck quite well. The second half of the program moved to more modern music (at least relative to Bach) and we heard Mendelssohn Sonatas 4 and 6 as well as the Liszt P&F on B-A-C-H. I suppose I am not as familiar with the Mendelssohn Sonatas as I am the Liszt, so I can't really speak to how the organ handled these 2 pieces. The Liszt however I have heard enough times on enough larger organs to recognize the "holes" that were evident within the bloom of voices. Even all coupled down, the instrument lacked some presence in this piece, and I'm fairly sure this literature was a stretch of its limits. Did I mention the wind was a bit "flexible" too. This was particularly evident when Felix played rapid staccato scales near the end of the Liszt. You could actually hear some of the coupled voices dropping out as he ascended the scale. Might have been a coupler adjustment problem, I'm no expert, but it only happened during these kind of passages. I don't imagine the audience members even heard it, but it was quite evident from where I sat right beside the instrument. Felix had a lot of praise for the touch of the instrument. He said it felt well built and even all coupled, had a nice touch. I had never heard of the builder Janke, but the church organist was all praise for him. The only problem is getting him to come over from Germany to perform repairs and make additions. He is obviously quite busy in his own country. As my close encounter came to a close with a standing ovation for Felix from the grateful mostly AGO crowd, Felix treated us to an encore of his famous Vierne Final complete with the "Working on the Railroad" transcription near the end. This was in honor of the church organist whose father had been a railroad man, and the tears in her eyes at the end showed she was honored and amused. I don't know if I will ever have such a privilege again to be as close to a performance and a performer as I was for these 2 days. It was an eye opening experience that I have dreamed about for a long time. All the reading and talking in the world could not have taught me as much as I learned in just several hours of observing. Many thanks to Felix and Hans Hell for taking this woefully ignorant author into the inner sanctum of the organ recitalist, and getting him close enough to learn. Along with my experience of being inside the Severance Hall Organ with Ken List, this was the experience of my life, and I shall never forget it.   Pray for Peace and Understanding Mike Gettelman    
(back) Subject: Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 11:02:29 -0400   The landmark Holtkamp organ at Syracuse University's Crouse College is = feted with a CD that celebrates the organ faculty who have known it over a = period of 50 years, and also to herald the organ's restoration for the 21st century. Hear it played by Arthur Poister, Will Headlee, Donald = Sutherland, Katharine Pardee, and Christopher Marks on a new CD. http://www.ohscatalog.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 11:50:33 -0400   On 5/18/04 11:02 AM, "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> wrote:   > Hear it played by Arthur Poister, Will Headlee, Donald Sutherland, > Katharine Pardee, and Christopher Marks on a new CD.   Oh my! I shall have to order that. Special memory: I visited a = ladyfriend in Utica, a student of Arthur Poister, summer of 1963. We went over to Syracuse, and she introduced me to him. He graciously asked what he could play for me. Brash brat that I was, I requested (and got) a private = recital of the Passacaglia and Fugue in c minor!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: The Church of England expands in France From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@sbarker.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 18:10:20 +0100   Anglican Church music is also growing in Europe. Northern Europe is actually part of the Canterbury Area RSCM, with which I am involved. Like most Diocese in the UK, they have an annual Choir Festival which I have been invited to conduct this coming June. There are participants coming from Church of England churches all over Europe.   Steve Barker Canterbury UK   John Foss wrote:   >There was an article in today's Daily Telegraph about >a growing branch of the Church of England in France >amongst the ex-patriate community. It reports the fact >that they celebrate traditional C of E services, >including hymns, mentions one of the villages (Magn=E9) >and shows a photograph of the inside of the church. It >would be interesting to know what the organ is. >Cavaille Coll or Veuve Clicquot perhaps? >John Foss > >"Yesterday about 60 of the flock congregated for >Sunday Communion in a borrowed Roman Catholic church >in the village of Magn=E9, set in verdant countryside >south of Poitiers." > >http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=3D/news/2004/05/17/nchur17.= xml&sSheet=3D/news/2004/05/17/ixhome.html > >=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D >www.johnfoss.gr >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ >Topics of the week : Point and Counterpoint The Never Ending Story >Strauss's "Alpine Symphony" CD and DVD death > > > > > >____________________________________________________________ >Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" >your friends today! Download Messenger Now >http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > >    
(back) Subject: RE: Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 12:38:12 -0500   And what happened to the woman in question?   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Alan Freed Sent: Tuesday, May 18, 2004 10:51 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years   On 5/18/04 11:02 AM, "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> wrote:   > Hear it played by Arthur Poister, Will Headlee, Donald Sutherland, > Katharine Pardee, and Christopher Marks on a new CD.   Oh my! I shall have to order that. Special memory: I visited a ladyfriend in Utica, a student of Arthur Poister, summer of 1963. We went over to Syracuse, and she introduced me to him. He graciously asked what he could play for me. Brash brat that I was, I requested (and got) a private recital of the Passacaglia and Fugue in c minor!   Alan =20   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: Re: Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 14:20:22 -0400   On 5/18/04 1:38 PM, "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> wrote:   > And what happened to the woman in question? >=20 Ah, now, THEREby hangs a tail. Beverly (a very sharp theologian, by the way) was an LCMS organist in Utica, but got the Sunday off so she and I could go whithersoever we wished; we opted a church in the Albany area, but neglected to check their =B3summer schedule,=B2 and got there just as the liturgy was ending. The pastor kindly told us just where to go (immediately) for good music and liturgy, a couple miles away. We went. Excellent. Afterward, at the door, I introduced myself, and then Beverly, to the pastor. =20   I had already notified Beverly that I planned to marry her. Then I went back to North Dakota, and we pursued things by U.S. Mail. But within months, that pastor to whom I=B9d introduced her proposed to her, with surely a better offer than mine, and the next year they were married.   And subsequently divorced.   Ah, well; not the first or last time for me that =B3things didn=B9t work out.=B2   Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 14:29:11 EDT   In a message dated 5/18/2004 2:21:13 PM Eastern Standard Time, acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   > Ah, now, THEREby hangs a tail   An excellent choice of words.............   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: stories From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 14:33:26 EDT   It never ceases to amaze me the stories you all can tell.....   i guess being couped up in the midwest really left me under a rock.....   imagine alan skipping church...   dale in florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Syracuse U. Holtkamp at 50 Years From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 16:16:19 -0400   On 5/18/04 2:29 PM, "Keys4bach@aol.com" <Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote:   > In a message dated 5/18/2004 2:21:13 PM Eastern Standard Time, > acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes: >=20 > Ah, now, THEREby hangs a tail >=20 > An excellent choice of words............. >=20 > dale in Florida=20   Y=B9know? Sometimes ROFL is not just a hyperbolic acronym, but a clinically accurate description of physical activity!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: stories From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 16:26:44 -0400   On 5/18/04 2:33 PM, "Keys4bach@aol.com" <Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote:   > imagine alan skipping church... >=20 1. Oh, heck. In college, I lived in a rented bedroom across the street fro= m the campus (and from the local church). Dang bells woke me up at 11 every Sunday morning=8Bbut I soon got back to sleep anyway.   2. I=B9m a pretty devout guy. But if I hated Christianity, I=B9d still be in church every Sunday, just because of what YOU guys DO there each Sunday, to my IMMEASURABLE delight!   Alan (who didn=B9t get the context of Dale=B9s challenge; did a message skip over my roof?)    
(back) Subject: Re: stories From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 16:35:48 EDT   In a message dated 5/18/2004 4:27:27 PM Eastern Standard Time,=20 acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   > (who didn=E2=80=99t get the context of Dale=E2=80=99s challenge; did a mes= sage skip over=20 > my roof?) =20   naw, nothing skipped--it was referring to the almost wife story who skipped=20 church to be with you..... ithink   dale in florida    
(back) Subject: Re: stories From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 16:59:58 -0400   On 5/18/04 4:35 PM, "Keys4bach@aol.com" <Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote:   > naw, nothing skipped--it was referring to the almost wife story who skipp= ed > church to be with you..... ithink   OH! OK. Well, not being Orthodox Jewish, we were allowed to go to church and STILL be =B3with=B2 each other. She skipped her =B3bench,=B2 but not =B3church=B2 altogether. Where else (ignoring other considerations) could we hear an hour of the music we both enjoyed so MUCH? It=B9s like =B3busman=B9s holiday=B2--when you ain=B9t at work, but you=B9re enjoying the =B3atmosphere=B2 of work in somebody else=B9s similar workplace. (And, even though she didn=B9t marry ME, she DID [unexpectedly] meet her soon husband just because of our little jaunt!) =20   Alan        
(back) Subject: used copy of Finale Allegro 98 From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 18:35:51 -0700   George Butterfield at Organ Stop in San Diego has a used copy of Finale Allegro 98 that was donated to the AGO resale bin. It has all the disks and docs. Finale lists it for $198; he's willing to sell it for $100; he'll pay postage.   You need to know that this ISN'T *full* Finale, but a basic music writer. Check Finale's website at   http://www.finalemusic.com/   for details.   If anybody wants it, contact George directly at:   GBorgan@aol.com   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: [Fwd: Re: Finale question] From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 18:39:52 -0700   OOPS! Forgot to mention it's for MAC!   Cheers,   Bud   -------- Original Message -------- Subject: Re: Finale question Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 21:36:45 EDT From: GBorgan@aol.com To: quilisma@cox.net       Here's what she gave me:   The CD with product serial number card   Two quick-reference cards (Version 1.0 for Macintosh)   Finale Allegro Installation and Tutorials for Mac (different from below)   F&A Installation and Tutorials, Vol.1 1.0 for Mac F&A Encyclopedia, Vol.2 1.0 for Mac F&A Reference Vol.3 1.0 for Mac     Looks pretty complete to me. What I don't understand is she had to give this up when she got a new computer. I see something at their web site where there could be a problem using it with OS X unless this or that is updated.   I notice that the new version does not call itself '98' either. I'm sure this is not the exact same thing as the $199 version on their web site since it is from 1998.   george        
(back) Subject: Caveat emptor [was Re: used copy of Finale Allegro 98] From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 20:49:43 -0500   Bud wrote:   > George Butterfield at Organ Stop in San Diego has a used copy of > Finale Allegro 98 that was donated to the AGO resale bin. It has all > the disks and docs. Finale lists it for $198; he's willing to sell it > for $100; he'll pay postage.   anyone considering purchasing this should keep in mind that it is of extremely limited utility. Since Finale does not have the capability of writing to earlier versions, the one who purchases this offering, is limited to opening files created with 1998 versions of the Finale family. Anything generated with Finale 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, or 2004 will not be able to be opened by Allegro 98.   ns    
(back) Subject: Re: changes in Bach From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 23:46:01 -0400   Of course, I desperately hope you are wrong, Colin, but if too many of us continue to inflict the insufferable tedium of preludes and fugues on a single registration on our listeners, then it might well be less than a hundred years. God forbid.   -WG   >"Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> predicted: > >... >I often wonder what will happen in a hundred years >time, long after churches have stopped using organs >altogether. ... >        
(back) Subject: Re: changes in Bach From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 23:52:08 -0400   Thank you, Bud, for your many excellent points, but this is not one of them. There are many perfectly obvious overlapping manual changes to be found in Bach. This idea is fuddy-duddery at best. Jes 'cause a teacher sayd it don't make it so.   -WG   ><quilisma@cox.net> > >I cannot recall the teacher at the moment, but it has been said that >when the sections of a piece OVERLAP, one generally should NOT change >manuals (on a GOOD organ); when there is SILENCE, then changing manuals >is an OPTION. Compare the sections of the b minor Prelude and Fugue with >the sections of the D Major Prelude and Fugue and the F Major Toccata >and Fugue. > > >