PipeChat Digest #4517 - Monday, May 24, 2004
 
Re: 32 resultant
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: seeing vs. hearing.
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: 32 resultant
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: A Plot ;-)
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: seeing vs. hearing.
  by "Alvin Wen" <wen@rochester.rr.com>
Changes at St. Sulpice
  by "Walter G." <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: seeing vs. hearing.
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: 32 resultant
  by "Walter G." <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved
  by "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com>
Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: seeing vs. hearing.
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved .... Leather Likes Humid Air ..... Wood do
  by "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com>
Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved .......  Huge Crowds
  by "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com>
Re: seeing vs. hearing.
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved .... Leather Likes Humid Air ..... Wood do
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: A Plot ;-)
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Atlantic City CHO
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Aeolian-Skinner Sound; Lyon & Healy Grandeur
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Music for D-day Anniversary
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved .... Leather Likes Humid Air ..... Wood do
  by "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com>
Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved .... Leather Likes Humid Air ..... Wood do
  by "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com>
Re: Music for D-day Anniversary
  by <Swedish5702@aol.com>
RE: 32 resultant
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved .... Leather Likes Humid Air ..... Wood do
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
32 resultant
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Roosevelt pitch help request
  by <Seedlac@aol.com>
Re: Roosevelt pitch help request
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: 32 resultant From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 06:36:28 EDT   >List, In my home organ I have a 32' resultant. The rank that is used is = the >16' bourdon wired in at the relay at cc and gg together and so forth up = the >pedal board. It does seem to loose its strength as one goes up the pedal >board however. I guess that is the nature of the beast? Gary   I've only played one organ that had a Resultant that went up the whole = pedal board. Once it went past the low octave, it became very obvious. Usually =   they are wired to quint in the low octave and then at the second C it = should revert to playing unisons notes an octave lower. Notes 1-12 would be = resultants playing two notes and at note 13, the 16' Bourdon would play by itself. = Maybe the regulation on the Bourdon needs to be checked or else the stop needs = to be rewired?   Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: Re: seeing vs. hearing. From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 07:00:49 EDT   In a message dated 5/24/2004 12:53:11 AM Eastern Standard Time, Gfc234@aol.com writes:   > Folks, the fact is that the best instruments are trackers (let's not = start > a fight here, please)   then, please refrain from saying things like this.......it is not universal.... just say I THINK that the best.....   as to the rest, people should spend more time with eyes shut at concerts = of ALL sorts......i enjoy performers like Bish, YoYo and Perlman much better = that way. i enjoy any symphony broadcast on NPR because i can listen unfettered by anything but the sound of the AC cooling down Florida heat.   dale in Florida looking forward to LA    
(back) Subject: Re: 32 resultant From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 12:40:07 +0100 (BST)   Maybe it's a physical phenomena - near the bottom of the range the actual c.p.s. are quite close to each other and therefore blend more easily in the ear e.g. CCCC is giving off 32 cycles per second, GGGG about 48, there is only a difference of 16 c.p.s. Each octave you go up the difference widens 64 - 96 =3D 32 Now, maths has never been my strong point and I am sure someone else knows more about it than I do - but there is a suggestion for you! John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Point and Counterpoint The Never Ending Story Strauss's "Alpine Symphony" CD and DVD death     ____________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends today! Download Messenger Now http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html  
(back) Subject: Re: A Plot ;-) From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 09:35:33 -0400   In a message dated 5/24/2004 12:19:36 AM Eastern Daylight Time, = azeilenga@theatreorgans.com writes:   > Thanks so much! Father will be amused.   You're welcome. Now I have a question: where can one find the music for = this?  
(back) Subject: Re: seeing vs. hearing. From: "Alvin Wen" <wen@rochester.rr.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 09:36:57 -0400   At 12:52 AM 5/24/2004, Gfc234@aol.com wrote: >All of this talk about being able to see the performer has really made me =   >think. When I attend recitals-I go for the music not the show.   While I agree with the sentiment, the last organ recital I attended had scarcely more attendees (about a dozen) than performers (five). Maintaining or growing the audience for live organ music will require putting on more of a "show", I think, to add value over what one gets out of listening to the radio or a CD. I applaud Felix Hell et al = for providing a video screen at his performances.   -Alvin      
(back) Subject: Changes at St. Sulpice From: "Walter G." <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 09:51:34 -0400   DR's videos are terrific! I love the story about Widor leaving the en chamade on for Faure. Keep watching, John. When the going gets rough, Roth has 2 registrants helping him.   Cheers, -WG   >Subject: >From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> wrote: >   >Often the constraints are more concerned with the playing ability of the >organist rather than the limitations of the organ. I have been watching = a >video of Daniel Roth playing the organ at St. Sulpice (available from OHS >http://www.ohscatalog.com/danrotschwei.html ). To watch him manipulating >the stops of a 5 manual, 100 stop organ, almost entirely by hand is >breathtaking and I don't think any solid state combination action, with >however many levels of memory, stop sequencers, etc., would be able to >achieve more. > >John Speller > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: seeing vs. hearing. From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 06:54:36 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   And I always thought the organ was invented for the purposes of street festivals and the Roman brothels!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > The organ > was not conceived to entertain idle-minded 21st > century audiences-it was > conceived to lift up people spiritually, and to > convey the innermost thoughts of > musicians and composers.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Domains =96 Claim yours for only $14.70/year http://smallbusiness.promotions.yahoo.com/offer  
(back) Subject: Re: 32 resultant From: "Walter G." <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 10:04:53 -0400   Yes, that is normal. Does it fold back to real 32' pitch in the second octave?   -WG   >"black" <gblack@ocslink.com> > >List, In my home organ I have a 32' resultant. The rank that is used is = the >16' bourdon wired in at the relay at cc and gg together and so forth up = the >pedal board. It does seem to loose its strength as one goes up the pedal >board however. I guess that is the nature of the beast? Gary > >      
(back) Subject: Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved From: "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 07:03:32 -0700 (PDT)   --- John Foss <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > instrument is not a worthwhile cause, but is it not > likely to cause problems again pretty soon, and so is > it really worth spending all that money on it? > John Foss >   In a word. Yes.   There are many instruments around the world that are in salty & humid air conditions. I can think of at several in Texas (those in Corpus Christi, Houston, Galveston, etc.).   Any instrument needs maintenance. Period. Perhaps a worthwhile question would be whether the funds being raised will provide an endowment for maintaining the instrument once repaired.   -Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 10:09:55 -0700   >--- John Foss <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: >> instrument is not a worthwhile cause, but is it not >> likely to cause problems again pretty soon, and so is >> it really worth spending all that money on it? >> John Foss >> > >In a word. Yes.   I 'll expand on that: Is it worth saving...   The Eiffel tower? The Grand Canyon? Taj Mahal?   etc. etc.   Stuff that is not ever likely to be repeated or replicated again.   John V                                       >There are many instruments around the world that are in salty & >humid air conditions. I can think of at several in Texas >(those in Corpus Christi, Houston, Galveston, etc.). > >Any instrument needs maintenance. Period. Perhaps a >worthwhile question would be whether the funds being raised >will provide an endowment for maintaining the instrument once >repaired. > >-Bill > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: seeing vs. hearing. From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 10:48:34 -0400   At 09:54 AM 5/24/2004, you wrote: >Hello, > >And I always thought the organ was invented for the >purposes of street festivals and the Roman brothels! > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK   Er, Colin, like, what sort of organ are we referring to with regard to the =   latter?   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved .... Leather Likes Humid Air ..... Wood doesn't. From: "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 08:35:03 -0700 (PDT)   Hi All, Talk to the folks at Ocean Grove NJ, with it's large pipe organ in an = unheated "barn" that seats about 5,000. It is several hundred feet from = the seashore. I believe some of the original Hope Jones leather has never = been replaced. Matt   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Domains - Claim yours for only $14.70/year  
(back) Subject: Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved ....... Huge Crowds From: "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 08:48:56 -0700 (PDT)   Hi All, Another factor in regard to the AC organ. It has the largest potential = audience in the world, walking by, ..... 24 hours a day, every day of the = year. Most folks would welcome the experience of hearing this organ .... = The Casino folks make sure there is very little available to "distract" = folks away from gambling. The more pipe organs people hear, outside of churches, playing secular = music ,,,,,,,,, the better for everyone and everything connected with pipe = organs. Mat   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Domains - Claim yours for only $14.70/year  
(back) Subject: Re: seeing vs. hearing. From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 09:34:25 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I think it must have been a water organ.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Bob Conway <conwayb@sympatico.ca> wrote:   Colin Mitchell wrote:-   > >And I always thought the organ was invented for the > >purposes of street festivals and the Roman > brothels! > Bob Conway replied:- > Er, Colin, like, what sort of organ are we referring > to with regard to the > latter? >         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Domains =96 Claim yours for only $14.70/year http://smallbusiness.promotions.yahoo.com/offer  
(back) Subject: Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved .... Leather Likes Humid Air ..... Wood doesn't. From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 09:37:59 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Well would someone like to explain the Florida Keys, where trees grow out of the water?   And for that matter, why do the leather labels on my CK jeans go hard and brittle when I've washed them?   Enquiring minds.......   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Mattcinnj <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> wrote:   > > Talk to the folks at Ocean Grove NJ, with it's large > pipe organ in an unheated "barn" that seats about > 5,000. It is several hundred feet from the seashore. > I believe some of the original Hope Jones leather > has never been replaced.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Domains =96 Claim yours for only $14.70/year http://smallbusiness.promotions.yahoo.com/offer  
(back) Subject: Re: A Plot ;-) From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 11:27:15 -0500   Seton probably has a cassette or CD available. My sister had a cassette. I know Our Lady of Victory does in their kindergarten curriculum. https://ssl25.pair.com/keycomm/olvs.org/store/10819-K.html   I'd like to see that someone actually has the sheet music, but I am not seeing that it exists. I did transcribe the song I need for our purposes, but I will have to check it with my choir members who know it.   Alicia Zeilenga       -----Original Message----- From: ContraReed@aol.com   > > Now I have a question: where can one find the music > for this?      
(back) Subject: Atlantic City CHO From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 13:25:58 EDT   I'm overjoyed to hear that something is finally going be done with the big =   Midmer - Losh. I worked with Tim Hoag, the AC municipal organist, for = three years when I worked for the Church Organ Co. We drove all over NJ and NY servicing organs and had a lot of time for conversation. Of course the AC = Auditorium was a frequent topic of conversation. Tim and Dennis McGurk, the curator, = were the two man restoration team. Of course two men were only enough to make a =   small dent in restoring 455 ranks. I learned from Tim about the many myths =   surrounding the huge instrument. Most of the damage came not from it's = close proximity to the sea but from poorly designed air conditioning ducts that = dumped condensed water on the windchests and the simple aging of the leather. = Hurricanes has sent sea water into one of the blower rooms but that damage was = repaired when the blowers were fitted with AC motors. The original blowers had DC = motors requiring a separate DC power supply. This started the myth that the local =   power company had to be called when the organ was turned on to start = another dynamo. Tim and Dennis had gotten most of the high pressure stuff, = including the 100" Ophecliede working and most of the two stage divisions making about = 120 ranks over two manuals. Other parts of the organ were off limits due to asbestos in the chambers. Tim was fond of saying "I have the biggest two = manual organ in the world." Sadly, when the 'Boardwalk Hall' renovations were started = the organ fell silent and many relays and other parts were disconnected. I = have stated some of this information here before but my point is that the = things that caused this organ to go down were not it's exposure to "salt air" but = damage from rotting leather and leaky AC ducts. It is unfortunate that a larger maintenance crew was not kept on staff to keep up with releathering the = giant and I liked the joke about tracker action. The fact that this organ was = constructed at all is absolutely amazing, if it was part of a work of fiction it would = be difficult to maintain a willful suspension of disbelief. Should it be restored, my greatest fear is that an adequate maintenance crew will not = remain on staff and it will slowly but surely go down again. The question of the = choice of playing action is a moot point. Electro mechanical would surely have = lasted longer but would not have worked on the high pressures used in most of the =   organ. Electro pneumatic action is very reliable when high quality leather = is used. The leather available then and now can last seventy years or more. = EP action got a bad reputation due to the poor quality leather used after WW 2. The organ and tanning industries learned their lesson. That's all for now, I'm =   keeping a very curious eye pointed south from my home here in central NJ.   Cheers:   Alan B.   Alan A. Binger Organbuilder, Inc. Freehold, NJ    
(back) Subject: Aeolian-Skinner Sound; Lyon & Healy Grandeur From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 13:31:28 -0400   Lorenz Maycher's new Raven CD, "The Aeolian-Skinner Sound" is now = available at http://www.ohscatalog.org   Also listed today on the opening page at http://www.ohscatalog.org is a brand new CD featuring what must be the largest extant Lyon & Healy pipe organ, with four manuals and 72 ranks, built in 1902 for the vast, barrel-vaulted splendor of Basilica of Our Lady of Sorrows in Chicago, = with the proverbial "acoustics for days." Mary Gifford plays period works by Horatio Parker, Percy Fletcher, Detram Luard-Selby, Carleton Inniss, and works by Schubert, Franck, and Mendelssohn. Lyon & Healy built superb pipe organs in Chicago 1895-1908, and harps bearing the name are still in production. Of course, the firm also published music and marketed and = built all types of musical instruments.      
(back) Subject: Re: Music for D-day Anniversary From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 14:09:03 -0400   The best song for D-day is Happy Birthday, as it is my birthday--duh. Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved .... Leather Likes Humid Air ..... Wood doesn't. From: "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 11:35:43 -0700 (PDT)   --- Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > And for that matter, why do the leather labels on my > CK jeans go hard and brittle when I've washed them?   Leather, especially in pitmans, does go stiff with water.   A Moller cabinet instrument I played at a RC church was "decorated" with poinsettas during Advent. Someone overfilled a pot, which dripped into the chest: voila instant ciphers!   Needless to say I no longer like Poinsettas (which I'm probably misspelling).   -Bill      
(back) Subject: Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved .... Leather Likes Humid Air ..... Wood doesn't. From: "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 11:50:38 -0700 (PDT)       I would (ha ha) guess that trees growing out of the swamps do not have to = worry about being air tight, or wrapping / bending, having glue adhere to = them, etc. Things which are a concern in pipe organs. My leather wallet = and shoes do not like water either .... but then again they haven't been = treated the same way organ leather is (was).   My Bechstein concert grand sounds optimal at 50 % humidity, give or take = about 10 % ...... all my other "el cheapo" pianos were not so fussy. Go = figure ???     Matt   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Domains - Claim yours for only $14.70/year  
(back) Subject: Re: Music for D-day Anniversary From: <Swedish5702@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 14:55:48 EDT   Hello Posters:   As a former US Navy Journalist and trombonist in the Navy Band my = suggestion is:     The National Hymn: God Of Our Fathers.   There are many variations on the theme.   Best, Craig Johnson Lock Haven, Pa. and Gloucester, Mass.    
(back) Subject: RE: 32 resultant From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 25 May 2004 08:00:09 +1200     >I've only played one organ that had a Resultant that went up the whole pedal board.=A0 Once it went past the low octave, it became very = obvious.=A0 Usually they are wired to quint in the low octave and then at the second = C it should revert to playing unisons notes an octave lower.=A0 Notes 1-12 = would be resultants playing two notes and at note 13, the 16' Bourdon would = play by itself.=A0 Maybe the regulation on the Bourdon needs to be checked or = else the stop needs to be rewired? =A0 Unless you already have another 16ft going, a 32ft Resultant is a waste = of a stopkey, as I see it. If the thing doesn't work well, it's no use. If it does work well, you no longer have a 16ft as you've "32-footed" it out = of existence. Anyway, as the standing wave of 32ft CCCC is some 42 ft long = (if I recall that correctly), you couldn't hear it properly unless you were = over 40ft from the pipes anyway, and not many folk have that kind of space at home.   Ross   --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.690 / Virus Database: 451 - Release Date: 22/05/2004 =20    
(back) Subject: Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved .... Leather Likes Humid Air ..... Wood doesn't. From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 14:52:52 -0500   The only problem I have encountered with pipe organs near the coast is = that silver contacts tend to corrode rapidly in the sea air and you tend = therefore to get a lot of dead notes. This is generally dealt with by = designing organs for coastal areas with gold contacts, and I think this = is what was done at Atlantic City, so that ought not to be a problem. = On the whole humid conditions are better for organs than extremely dry = conditions, which is why the historic trackers of Nantucket and Prince = Edward Islland have lasted so well. Extreme dryness tends to dry out = the leather and crack the woodwork, and this would not be expected to be = a problem at Atlantic City. They have over the years had a hurricane = and various roofleaks, which have seriously damaged parts of the organ. = Most of the damage, however, was done by recent construction in the = building where the advice of the experts was not followed and few if any = precautions were taken to protect the instrument.   John Speller   ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Mattcinnj=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Monday, May 24, 2004 1:50 PM Subject: Re: AC Midmer-Losh to be Saved .... Leather Likes Humid Air = ...... Wood doesn't.     I would (ha ha) guess that trees growing out of the swamps do not have = to worry about being air tight, or wrapping / bending, having glue = adhere to them, etc. Things which are a concern in pipe organs. My = leather wallet and shoes do not like water either .... but then again = they haven't been treated the same way organ leather is (was). =20   My Bechstein concert grand sounds optimal at 50 % humidity, give or = take about 10 % ...... all my other "el cheapo" pianos were not so = fussy. Go figure ???=20    
(back) Subject: 32 resultant From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 15:09:56 -0500   Gary Black <gblack@ocslink.com> wrote:   > I have a 32' resultant. The rank that is used is the 16' bourdon > = wired in at the relay at cc and gg together and so forth up the > pedal board. It does seem to loose its strength as one goes up   Then Walter G." wrote: > Does it fold back to real 32' pitch in the second > octave?   That is the more "typical" and successful treatment than to continue the unision and quite pitches up beyond Tenor C on the Pedalboard Otherwise, one can discern the two pitches and it's not really a Resultant anymore = but two distinct pitches.   Faithfully,   G.A. -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO <>< Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS  
(back) Subject: Roosevelt pitch help request From: <Seedlac@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 17:27:16 EDT   Any one out there have experience with tuning Roosevelts? I have been making repairs and tuning the 3m 1883 Roosevelt at St. Luke's =   Episcopal, Baltimore. I expected to set the temperament at A435, like = most 19th century organs, but found it exactly 1/2 step higher. The wind pressure is =   3.5 a reasonable pressure for an organ of the period. The pipe names and = notes are correct and the scrolls and stoppers are in a rational location. The = tone of the organ is quite bold, and that originally led me to believe that the =   pressure had been raised. Are there any other Roosevelts out there a 1/2 step higher than usual? Steve Baltimore  
(back) Subject: Re: Roosevelt pitch help request From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 24 May 2004 17:24:14 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: <Seedlac@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, May 24, 2004 4:27 PM Subject: Roosevelt pitch help request     > Any one out there have experience with tuning Roosevelts? > I have been making repairs and tuning the 3m 1883 Roosevelt at St. = Luke's > Episcopal, Baltimore. I expected to set the temperament at A435, like most 19th > century organs, but found it exactly 1/2 step higher. The wind pressure = is > 3.5 a reasonable pressure for an organ of the period. The pipe names and notes > are correct and the scrolls and stoppers are in a rational location. The tone > of the organ is quite bold, and that originally led me to believe that = the > pressure had been raised. > Are there any other Roosevelts out there a 1/2 step higher than usual?     A pitch of A=3D450 is not unusual for the nineteenth century. A=3D435 is = more typical of the early part of the twentieth century.   John Speller.