PipeChat Digest #4868 - Monday, November 1, 2004
 
Re: Music today
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: modern technology
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: Hammond models
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: Historic Impotence
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: Historic Impotence
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: moving day
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
USAF Chapel
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Hammond organ designations; was:a serious discussion
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Re: Hammond models
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: moving day
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE:  Today's Music
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Subject: Re: Buddites (was, horses and buggies)
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: Subject: Re: Buddites (was, horses and buggies)
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Re: Hammond models
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
Re: An Estey Update
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
Re: Subject: Re: Buddites (was, horses and buggies)
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Second to none?
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
comparing sewing machines and tracker organs
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: a serious discussion
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
RE: Second to none?
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: Second to none?
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: Hammond models -- Correct Info
  by "M Collins" <mcoll@panix.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Music today From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 08:06:10 -0800 (PST)   Desi Giggles (NO ONE is allowed to call me Desi but you Monty!) I am now playing Bach's Wider Toccata on a 2 Manual 23 Rank Pells Because = (BUD, lol) im at Immanuel UCC on the far far Southwest side of Chicago.. = Avg attendance is about 90, a semi-professional choir of 15, and while the = organ has thin principals, it is a very suitable instrument and has a = complete stop list for everything. A pair of swell strings makes the most = nostalgic feel. The 16' fagott ped/sw is also has a nice gravity to it.         From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Re: modern technology From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 11:27:39 EST   The Allen organ I play on Sunday has Midi and a recorder where I could = record all of the music for the service and just press a button when it was time = for that music. It also has samples of Bach, Widor, and even gospel music. I =   have not used it, but Keith pressed the button for the Widor 5th Toccata = when he was going to "play" the Postlude one Sunday evening. People are still talking about it. Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond models From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 10:37:43 -0600   Actually, the C stands for Concert. The C-3 has a quasi-AGO 32-note pedalboard, the B-3 only a flat, albeit radiating, 25-note. The C-3 also adds about 8 expansion sounds for the pedal division. I don't remember them adding a great deal to the utility of the instrument. And I can't check since I donated my C-3 to an evangelical church for a tax receipt many years ago.   TTFN, Russ Greene     On Oct 31, 2004, at 11:35 PM, First Christian Church of Casey, IL wrote:   > Josh asked about Hammond models. The B-3 and C-3 are identical except > for > the cabinet.....the C stands for church, and it has a full cabinet > unlike > the B-3 which stands on legs. >    
(back) Subject: Re: Historic Impotence From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 11:48:44 EST   At age 14 I was called by a pastor of a Mexican church and asked to be the =   organist. First, he asked if I knew how to play in Spanish. I assured = him I did. Then he asked if I could play a "large" organ. Having taken lessons = on the 3/57 Hillgreen, Lane & Co. for 2 years, I said I could. Upon arriving = to practice the "large" organ was a Hammond spinet. Not to be outdone, and = wanting my first position, I took it and the challenge of the Hammond. Playing in =   "Spanish" was no problem. When I was 18 I moved to Detroit where I went = to a small SBC which was over a grocery store, just to visit. No one there = that week played the organ or piano and they asked for a volunteer. The organ, you guessed, a Hammond Spinet, but this one had chimes. They wanted to sing = "Ring the Bells of Heaven" with chimes playing the melody. I played there for = several months and then decided to visit the churches in the area rather than have = a stead position on the Hammond. My favorite church was Jefferson Ave. Presbyterian Church. Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: Historic Impotence From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 11:56:01 EST   P. S. When I moved back to Oklahoma I was called to a small church which = had another Hammond Spinet. By this time I was able to play organ repertoire = with a few accommodations. When that church closed, I was asked to play at another small church with, you guessed, another Hammond Spinet. I talked = them into getting a 2 manual Allen, which was some better. My mother and father = were in Eastern Star and I was asked to be organist. Guess what they had? Most = of the funeral homes also had Hammonds of one kind or another. Between the spinets, I played at the Army chapel on a B3. The next organ was a 3 = manual Allen with an ash key bed, which was warped. Then there was the 3 manual = Rodgers that would blast everyone out except for the softest registeration. From = there I have played several Pipe organs, 3 Moellers and one Wicks. Now I am back = to a 2 manual Allen. Any church organist has to be flexible and play what is =   there to the Glory of God. In each case where I went, I believe God = called me to be there for a reason. Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: moving day From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 12:09:51 EST   We'll remember you as you move. It is no fun. However we are grateful = you found a home you could afford. Lee and Keith  
(back) Subject: USAF Chapel From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 11:12:42 -0600   The Air Force Chapel at Colorado Springs is stunning; the organs were not being played when I was touring.   But the pulpit in the main chapel looks like nothing so much as a hugely oversized Maytag wringer washing machine, in gleaming white!   Maybe their favorite hymn is "Are You Washed?" Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Hammond organ designations; was:a serious discussion From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 12:29:06 EST   I understand that the earlier models were designated by console style. The = B was the basic organ on spindle legs, while the C series designated the = church style consisting of a fully enclosed support system reminiscent of the = "real" consoles of yore.   Am I correct?   Musically, Stan krider   In a message dated 11/01/2004 12:17:08 AM Eastern Standard Time, Joshwwhite@aol.com writes: This is a strange question, but is a B-3 tonally different from a B-2, = C-3 or an Rt-3, or any other tonewheel Hammonds of that period? Excluding of =   course, the addition of percussions, key clicks, vibrato and the other variables....  
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond models From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 09:34:26 -0800   Nope. "C" stands for "church cabinet." The insides are identical to a B-3.   Model C-3   Production Years: Jan 1955 to 1974 Synopsis: Take a B-3's guts and put it in the C type church model case. Cabinet Size: With pedal keyboard and bench: 48.75x46x49.5 (WHD, inches), 450lbs with bench and pedalboard Finish: Walnut/Oak and speciality finishes. Later version in both finishes less quatrefoil. US and UK cases are slightly different. Manuals: Swell and Great, 61 keys each. Pedals: 25-note radiating, detachable. Controls: 9 presets and 2 sets of 9 drawbars for each manual. 2 adjustable drawbars (16' and 8') for pedals. Amp/Output: Internal preamp only.   Picture: C3, C3 in white, and another C3 from a catalogue.   The earliest 32-note pedal Hammond was the Model E:   Model E   Production Years: Jul 1937 to Jul 1942 Cabinet Size: 57x47-7/8x47-5/8 (WHD, inches) with pedal keyboard. Approximately 579lbs, with bench and pedals. Finish: Walnut Manuals: Swell and great, 61 playing keys each. 32-note concave radiating detachable pedal board, built to AGO specifications. Controls: 9 preset buttons and 2 sets of 9 adjustable harmonic drawbars for each manual: For pedals - 4 numbered and labeled toe pistons, 2 adjustable drawbars (16' and 8'), and great to pedal 8' coupler. 2 expression pedals, one for swell and one for great and pedals. Visual position indicator of sliding rod type. Two expression pedals, one for swell and one for great and pedals. Features: Separate adjustable tremulants for swell and great manuals. Standard main and chorus generator units; "ON" and "OFF" switch = for chorus.   Picture: Model E console and details of the keyboard and pedals (from Adrianne Schutt's page)   The later 32-pedal Concert Model was the RT-2 and the RT-3 (minor = changes):   Model RT-2   Production Years: Nov 1949 to Jan 1955 Synopsis: Same as model RT but with controls which provide vibrato on either or both manuals, also additional control for "NORMAL" or "SOFT" overall volume. Finish: Walnut. Manuals: Swell and Great, 61 keys each. Pedals: 32-note radiating, detachable. Controls: 9 preset keys and 2 sets of 9 adjustable harmonic drawbars for each manual. For pedals, two adjustable drawbars (16' and 8'). One expression pedal controlling swell, great and pedals. Amp/Output: Internal preamp only.   Model RT-3   Production Years: Jan 1955 to 1973 Synopsis: Same as RT-2 (ie 3 chorus/vibrato settings and a volume soft/normal tab) but with Hammond percussion feature as well (as per = C3/B3). Finish: Walnut/Oak Manuals: Swell and great, 61 playing keys each. Pedals: 32-note detachable pedal keyboard. Controls: 9 preset keys and 2 sets of 9 adjustable harmonic drawbars for each manual. For pedals, two adjustable drawbars (16' and 8'). One expression pedal controlling swell, great and pedals. Features: Pedal solo system has separate volume control, providing the following solo effects: 32-foot bourdon, 32-foot bombarde, 16 foot solo, 8-foot solo, 4-foot solo, 2- and 1-foot solo, also tablets for mute control and pedal "ON". Weighs 525lbs.   Picture: RT3 (black and white)   Cheers,   Bud     Russ Greene wrote:   > Actually, the C stands for Concert. The C-3 has a quasi-AGO 32-note > pedalboard, the B-3 only a flat, albeit radiating, 25-note. The C-3 also =   > adds about 8 expansion sounds for the pedal division. I don't remember > them adding a great deal to the utility of the instrument. And I can't > check since I donated my C-3 to an evangelical church for a tax receipt > many years ago. > > TTFN, > Russ Greene > > > On Oct 31, 2004, at 11:35 PM, First Christian Church of Casey, IL wrote: > >> Josh asked about Hammond models. The B-3 and C-3 are identical except >> for >> the cabinet.....the C stands for church, and it has a full cabinet = unlike >> the B-3 which stands on legs. > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: moving day From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 09:34:59 -0800   THANKS!   Cheers,   Bud   OMusic@aol.com wrote:   > We'll remember you as you move. It is no fun. However we are grateful > you found a home you could afford. Lee and Keith      
(back) Subject: RE: Today's Music From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 12:48:51 -0500   From Monty:   "Desi-- This is obviously not from St. Turibius. You didn't list what church = this is. Although Martin Luther was an Augustinian priest, I doubt the = priests at St. Turibius would really be celebrating his ministry. Tell us about = your new job--since obviously you have to have one. Where is it? What kind = of organ? What kind of choir program? Etc..."   Darn, Monty, you burst my bubble. Here I was thinking the Reformation must =   be finally taking hold in at least one RC church, even if it *is* a few hundred years late.    
(back) Subject: Subject: Re: Buddites (was, horses and buggies) From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 10:18:27 -0700   <Gfc234@aol.com> said,   >> Honestly, I simply cannot comprehend this peculiar obsession for tiny organs with limited resources, that are completely stripped of any accessories whatsoever other than keys and stop knobs, and that you can't do anything with - other than "tinkle-tinkle-tinkle." There's something v <<   > So you are implying what organists 100 years ago did nothing but "tinkle tinkle"? <     With all due respect and an equal amount of good-cheer, no, that is not at all what I was implying. This is another fine example of how postings can be "skewed" to the degree that their original intent is completely misrepresented.   Also, yes, per another poster's comment, I do realize that many early one-manual organs do have robust Diapasons (what the neo-naysayers in the previous generation dismissed as "tubby octopods; now, suddenly, they are cherished...). I did not mean "tinkling" in the most literal sense of the word but in more general terms.   You know, there are a lot of "old sewing machine" nuts running around with a fondness for foot-treadle sewing machines. I can see that. They are wonderful little machines. One of my grandmothers had one and it was fun to watch her at work, listening to the quaint click-whirr sounds and watching the belt-driven flywheel spin, driven by the footwork of my sweet grandma.   Collectors of these quaint, vintage machines take great delight in developing high skill on them. They display with great pride the fruits of their labors. Yes, they are lovely looking sewn good. Sometimes. Some folks' skills are better-honed than others.   (I'll never forget the agony of trying soooooo hard not to laugh when a friend proudly displayed a cute cotton-print dress he had made on his inherited Singer foot-pedal machine. Small problem: The dress would only have fit the Hunchback of Notre Dame. One shoulder was several inches higher than the other, and there was a "puff" of excess fabric sticking out from the back side that he tried to conceal by vigorously ironing it [with his 1942 HEAT ONLY, no steam, no teflon iron].)   Now, some of these people may work in sewing machine sales, &/or in manufacturing plants where sewn goods are produced.   Can you just imagine the reactions from other sales people (not to mention the customers) if they demanded that the store should onlt sell foot-pedaled sewing machines with no "garish, cluttery, cheap, unnecessry" modern sewing aids?   Or what if they showed up to the clothing factory lugging a 1909 Singer to produce their day's work? Or, more aptly, loudly pronouncing that all the modern electric sewing machines with mini-computerized accessories and all sorts of wonderful attachments are gross aberrations of the art of sewing, and insisting that all the modern machines must be replaced with non-electric machines that have no extra features?   Yes, a beginning sewing machine operator should start on a basic, non-electric machine to learn the basics of sewing, and to gain an appreciation of how the art of sewing machine manufacturing has evolved. But surely no one in their right mind would expect (let alone presume or insist) that these vintage-type machines would be put into regular service today.   In the same vein, and as Monty stated, yes, organists should know HOW to play on "stripped" organs. The question is, "WHY should anyone have -- or WANT -- to do so in our time on a regular basis? Because, as he said, "They Are There?" Well, "They" would NOT "Be There" if people stopped demanding they be PUT THERE.   A final note... Bud has reveled in the new term "Buddite." However, I feel he has misdefined it in a more favorable light than the person who coined it probably meant it.   Its origin word "Luddite" does not indicate someone who prefers 'small' technology but, rather, OBSOLETE technology. A Luddite is someone who insists on clinging to the technology of a past era, for whatever reason but very often .... because of FEAR.   Here's Webster's definition of the term:   Lud.dite n. 1. Any of a group of British workers who between 1811 and 1816 rioted and destroyed laborsaving textile machinery in the belief that such machinery would diminish employment. 2. One who opposes technical or technological change. [After Ned Ludd, an English laborer who was supposed to have destroyed weaving machinery around 1779.]   ~ C      
(back) Subject: Re: Subject: Re: Buddites (was, horses and buggies) From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 12:25:48 -0600   I can't see a sewing machine and an organ as a good comparison. I would = go on, but I think this topic should go to rest.   Hail Schnitger!   Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St. Champaign, IL 61820 217.390.0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond models From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 13:30:45 -0500   Sorry Russ, the C stands for "Church". What you have described is the = RT-3. I ought to know; I was saddled (voluntarily) with one for over 35 years. The pedal board was AGO--not quasi anything.The C and RT consoles were quite similar. The RTs were wider by about a foot. The Cs had a quatrefoil =   molding on the side of the console and the bench. The Cs, though, only had =   that chintzy (or do I mean chinchy) 25-note flat pedal board. The RT-3 was =   called the "Concert Model" in Hammond advertising. To see pics of my old Hammond RT-3, go to here: http://members.aol.com/bachsfugue/hommage.html.   Ross Coulson "Cole" Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA   >Actually, the C stands for Concert. The C-3 has a quasi-AGO 32-note >pedalboard, the B-3 only a flat, albeit radiating, 25-note. The C-3 also >adds about 8 expansion sounds for the pedal division. I don't remember >them adding a great deal to the utility of the instrument. And I can't >check since I donated my C-3 to an evangelical church for a tax receipt >many years ago. > >TTFN, >Russ Greene    
(back) Subject: Re: An Estey Update From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 12:28:13 -0500   Phil! I'm particularly interested in an Estey organ that I believe = to have been originally built for a church in my home town. I believe the organ dated from the 1920's. It turned on and made sounds as late as = 1972, a few years after the church had been closed. I left town for several = years and have just returned. The organ is gone. I'm curious as to what it = was. I'm trying to find out what happened to it. I've looked through the = posted Estey opus list without success. I've written to the Estey museum but = have not received a response. Can you help me to find out when it was built, it's specifications, etc? The church building still stands as an Adult Center in the village of Tupper Lake, New York or in the village of Faust New York. It could be listed as in either village. I believe that the church was Presbyterian back in the 1920's. Thanks.   Jerry   Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Bat Arhonious Software, = www.chirpingbat.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Subject: Re: Buddites (was, horses and buggies) From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 13:47:52 EST     In a message dated 11/1/04 12:19:13 PM, crl@137.com writes:     > Its origin word "Luddite" does not indicate someone who > prefers 'small' technology but, rather, OBSOLETE technology. > A Luddite is someone who insists on clinging to the > technology of a past era, for whatever reason but very often > ... because of FEAR. > >   Yes, I suppose it is fear. Oh how my knees shake when I push a piston. = I once fainted when I changed memory levels at church. LOL Cheers :) gfc       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Second to none? From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 14:03:28 -0500       On 31 Oct 2004 at 13:54, David Evangelides expounded:   > How about the Tenth Presbyterian in Philadelphia? I used to look in > the Yellow Pages to find 2nd through 9th. Actually. 10th Pres is on > 10th Street. It's where Robert Elmore played for years.   Actually, it's on Broad Street, the equivalent of 14th street. First = Pres. in Philly might be in the Germantown section of town..... where Robert Carwithen = reigned for many years.   --Shirley, who occasionally sang in the choir at Tenth while an organ = student of Robert Elmore.    
(back) Subject: comparing sewing machines and tracker organs From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 11:15:51 -0800   While I was at Holy Rosary in the 1960s, the retired pastor celebrated his golden jubilee in the priesthood. My godmother (the housekeeper) sewed an entire Solemn Mass set of vestments for the occasion ... chasuble, dalmatic, tunicle, stoles, maniples, altar frontal, tabernacle veil, apparelled amices and albs. The motif was the wheat and grapes of the Eucharist. She hand-sewed the entire thing ON HER KNEES. It took her about three years. When the current pastor implored her to sit down and use her sewing machine, she said quietly, "Domine, non sum dignus" and went back to work. NOTHING machine-made EVER touched that altar ... altar-cloths, purificators, palls, corporals.   But I digress (grin) ...   I have presided at everything from a one-manual Estey reed organ to a four-manual Casavant; I'm certainly not AFRAID of modern consoles; but if money is tight (and even if it ISN'T) I'll choose pipes over gadgets EVERY TIME.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Re: a serious discussion From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 14:13:44 -0500   The C-3 is the church model (hence the "C") of the B-3. The C had more = wood on the cabinet, the B has spindley legs. Neither have internal speakers, and = except for the cabinet are identical. The RT *is* different; I'll leave that to = the Hammond authorities on the list. :)   --Shirley   On 31 Oct 2004 at 23:47, Joshwwhite@aol.com expounded:   > > This is a strange question, but is a B-3 tonally different from a B-2, > C-3 or an Rt-3, or any other tonewheel Hammonds of that period? > Excluding of course, the addition of percussions, key clicks, vibrato > and the other variables.... Josh      
(back) Subject: RE: Second to none? From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 03:32:25 +0800   Wonder if the people at Tenth Presbyterian, Philadelphia(http://www.tenth.o= rg/) feel inferior? Doubt it.   ----- Original Message ----- From: Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: 'PipeChat' <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: RE: Second to none? Date: Sun, 31 Oct 2004 17:45:59 -0600   > OK, I'll bite. There's many "Seconds" and more churches out there - > Isn't it New York City that has numbered Churches of Christ Scientist > out the ying-yang? >=20 > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > (too tired to make a joke for you) >=20 > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > Peter Rodwell >=20 > And why are there apparently no "Second <whatever>" > churches? At least I can't remember ever receiving > details of an organ in a chuch so named. Does this > mean that, once there is a First Church in a place, > the next one to be built has to be called something > else so that its parishioners don't feel inferior, > as they presumably would were it called "Second..."? -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: Second to none? From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 03:39:07 +0800   Tenth is at 1701 Delancey Street Surrounding streets: 17th, Spruce and (a bit to the west(?)) 18th.   ----- Original Message ----- From: David Evangelides <davide@theatreorgans.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: Second to none? Date: Sun, 31 Oct 2004 13:54:24 -0700   >=20 > How about the Tenth Presbyterian in Philadelphia? I used to look in the= =20 > Yellow Pages to find 2nd through 9th. Actually. 10th Pres is on 10th=20 > Street. It's where Robert Elmore played for years. >=20 > On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 1:06 pm, Peter Rodwell wrote: > > Why are there so many churches in the US called the > > "First <something>"? First Baptist, First Methodist, > > > > And why are there apparently no "Second <whatever>" > > churches? >=20 > David E >=20 > David Evangelides > Fulfillment Manager > International Bible Society > 719-867-2729 > (Sent by wireless T-Mobile Sidekick) >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20       -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond models -- Correct Info From: "M Collins" <mcoll@panix.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 15:07:16 -0500 (EST)   On Mon, 1 Nov 2004, Russ Greene wrote: > Actually, the C stands for Concert. The C-3 has a quasi-AGO 32-note > pedalboard, the B-3 only a flat, albeit radiating, 25-note. The C-3 also = adds > about 8 expansion sounds for the pedal division.   The C- models all have concave, radiating, 25-note pedalboards. The RT- models have concave, radiating, 32-note pedalboards. It is a debate for others to determine how AGO-like any of them are.   Additionally, it was the RT models, not the C models that had the additional "Pedal Solo Unit" which provided extra voices in the pedals.   See http://theatreorgans.com/hammond/faq for the complete list of features and model distinctions.   --- MJC (Hammond RT-3, 2mp Estey Studio, 1m Mason & Hamlin, .75m Estey portable)