PipeChat Digest #4869 - Monday, November 1, 2004
 
Re: Hammond models -- Correct Info
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Key wedges
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Hammond models
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
Re: Music today
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Hammonds
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Hammonds
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
RE: Music today
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net>
Re: Key wedges
  by "cc" <belcanto@brainerd.net>
Tenth Pres. (was Second to None)
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Music today and yesterday
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Halloween Organ
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Halloween Organ
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Hammonds
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Tenth Pres. (was Second to None)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Halloween Organ
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Second to none?
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
Re: Halloween Organ
  by "Just Me Bob" <rammer@zoomlynx.com>
Re: Second to none?
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
RE: Key wedges
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Re: Hammonds
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
RE: Hammonds
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Sewing Machines and Organs
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Michael David lol
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Tenth Pres. (was Second to None)
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Sewing Machines and Organs
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Hammond models -- Correct Info From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 12:34:32 -0800   Nope. Bs and Cs had FLAT, radiating pedal-boards; I oughtta know; I played enough wrong notes on 'em (chuckle). They were actually sorta like the turn-of-the-century flat, radiating 27-note (?) Estey = pedal-boards.   Cheers,   Bud   M Collins wrote:   > On Mon, 1 Nov 2004, Russ Greene wrote: > >> Actually, the C stands for Concert. The C-3 has a quasi-AGO 32-note >> pedalboard, the B-3 only a flat, albeit radiating, 25-note. The C-3 >> also adds about 8 expansion sounds for the pedal division. > > > The C- models all have concave, radiating, 25-note pedalboards. The RT- > models have concave, radiating, 32-note pedalboards. It is a debate for > others to determine how AGO-like any of them are. > > Additionally, it was the RT models, not the C models that had the > additional "Pedal Solo Unit" which provided extra voices in the pedals. > > See http://theatreorgans.com/hammond/faq for the complete list of > features and model distinctions. > > --- MJC > (Hammond RT-3, 2mp Estey Studio, 1m Mason & Hamlin, .75m Estey = portable) > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Key wedges From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 15:32:42 -0500   As a woodworker, I could in a matter of minutes make you the required = wedge, but I think a better idea is to use a "living wedge". Find a young piano student in the congregation to hold the key for you. He/she will love = doing it, and it could spark interest to someday learn to play the organ. The parents would love it too.   Andy     On Mon, 1 Nov 2004 09:29:24 -0500, Jonathan Humbert wrote > Dear Esteemed Colleagues, > > One of the pieces that I'm playing for our December Holiday-music > concert requires the use of 2 key wedges. My first question is this, > where do I find and buy these said wedges? Not knowing exactly how > these wedges work (I've been using folded-up pieces of paper to > practice), my other concern is, do they allow the playing of a note > immediately adjacent to one of the wedges? In other words, the upper > wedge is on a B and at 2 points in the music I must play the C right > beside it. Incidentally, the piece is Il Est N=E9 from Dale Woods' > Christmas Pipings book. Any ideas and suggestions would be > gratefully accepted. Thanks in advance, everyone! > > Regards, > Jonathan Humbert     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond models From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 14:15:11 -0500   I've had a Hammond RT-3 in storage for seven years. I was warned against applying full voltage to it when I turn it on for the first time. Is this a concern?   Jerry   Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Bat Arhonious Software, = www.chirpingbat.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Music today From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 15:58:25 EST   >_RMB10@aol.com_ (mailto:RMB10@aol.com) wrote: >(snip) >>> Offertory Meditation Berceuse L. Vierne   Just to clarify, I didn't play this, I was just quoting it from another = post. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Hammonds From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 13:05:50 -0800   That's OK ... the local Hammond repair man is constantly getting frantic phone calls from younger organists who walk in to play funerals (mostly in funeral homes) and have no idea how to START a Hammond (chuckle), OR where the "stops" are.   I don't count, because Hammonds of different ages take more or less time to start ... just hold "Start" until you hear the motor get up to speed; then push "Run" (while HOLDING "Start") until you hear the motor get up to speed again; then release the "Start" toggle or button.   Lessee ... I USED to have the presets (the reverse-color keys at the bass end of the keyboard) in a file ... nope, lost it again ... I know somebody on here has it ... could you please post it again?   THANKS!   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Hammonds From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 16:14:27 EST   >Actually, the C stands for Concert. The C-3 has a quasi-AGO 32-note >pedalboard, the B-3 only a flat, albeit radiating, 25-note. The C-3 >also adds about 8 expansion sounds for the pedal division. I don't >remember them adding a great deal to the utility of the instrument. And >I can't check since I donated my C-3 to an evangelical church for a tax >receipt many years ago.     Actually, this is not correct. The B and C models, have 25 pedals. The = RT3 and the D152/155 models have the 32 note AGO pedals with the "pedal solo unit". There are two 32' stops, a 16 reed, an 8' reed, a 4' reed, and a = 2' and 1' stop. While the rest of the organ is tonewheel, the pedal solo unit = is tube generated, and sounds like an early electronic organ. We have a = D152 at my church and the pedal solo unit works, but I only use the 32' Bourdon. The D152 has internal speakers, while the RT3 needs external speakers--however, any Hammond sounds best when paired with Leslie = speakers. For further information, you can go to _www.theatreorgans.com_ (http://www.theatreorgans.com) and go to the Hammond organ pages and = browse around. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: RE: Music today From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 15:53:42 -0600   Don't leave us in the dark!!   When did you leave St. T?   How did the Fritts / Rodgers combination the funeral home people donated work out?   You were certainly right to ignore the seemingly sarcastic comments from people who actually build organs.   Where is Paul Harvey when we need him??   michael - who hopes Sebastian hasn't read any of this and hurt himself laughing   ps - how wide is box toccata?     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of T.Desiree' Hines Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 10:06 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Music today     Desi Giggles (NO ONE is allowed to call me Desi but you Monty!) I am now playing Bach's Wider Toccata on a 2 Manual 23 Rank Pells = Because (BUD, lol) im at Immanuel UCC on the far far Southwest side of Chicago.. = Avg attendance is about 90, a semi-professional choir of 15, and while the = organ has thin principals, it is a very suitable instrument and has a complete stop list for everything. A pair of swell strings makes the most nostalgic feel. The 16' fagott ped/sw is also has a nice gravity to it.  
(back) Subject: Re: Key wedges From: "cc" <belcanto@brainerd.net> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 15:55:06 -0600   I asked this same question on another organ list, and I was told to use pencils. Boy, I sure don't know how they ever get that to work! The ends just kept breaking off. I had my husband make me some little wood wedges, about one inch wide and an inch and a half long. They work great! I can usually play the keys next to the wedge if they are not played in repetition.   Carla C     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Jonathan Humbert" <jhumbert@ptd.net> To: "Pipechat@Pipechat. Org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 8:29 AM Subject: Key wedges     Dear Esteemed Colleagues,   One of the pieces that I'm playing for our December Holiday-music concert requires the use of 2 key wedges. My first question is this, where do I find and buy these said wedges? Not knowing exactly how these wedges work (I've been using folded-up pieces of paper to practice), my other concern is, do they allow the playing of a note immediately adjacent to one of the wedges? In other words, the upper wedge is on a B and at 2 points in the music I must play the C right beside it. Incidentally, the piece is Il Est N=E9 from Dale Woods' Christmas Pipings book. Any ideas and suggestions would be gratefully accepted. Thanks in advance, everyone!   Regards, Jonathan Humbert       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Tenth Pres. (was Second to None) From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 15:17:00 -0700   Sorry - I stand totally corrected about the address.   David E   On 11/01/04 at 7:03 PM Shirley wrote: > > How about the Tenth Presbyterian in Philadelphia? Actually, it's on Broad Street, the equivalent of 14th street. First Pres. in Philly might be in the Germantown section of town..... where Robert Carwithen reigned for many years.   --Shirley, who occasionally sang in the choir at Tenth while an organ student of Robert Elmore.   David E   David Evangelides Fulfillment Manager International Bible Society 719-867-2729 (Sent by wireless T-Mobile Sidekick)  
(back) Subject: Re: Music today and yesterday From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 17:53:18 EST   I'm not laughing, but I do agree with Michael and Maggy that some of = us are curious as to why the person in question would choose to leave their = post just as they had narrowed down their choice of organbuilders to two = finalists. Most people in church positions never get to the point of having an instrument that they designed get built. In light of all the work, = research, and consideration that went into the organ project, why would one leave just = when it was all getting so real?  
(back) Subject: Re: Halloween Organ From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 17:49:56 -0600   HI bob, sorry to answer now but email me privately and i can send you a = copy. thanks. Gary ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Just Me Bob=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Wednesday, October 27, 2004 6:12 PM Subject: Halloween Organ     Back in the 60s a Don Knotts comedy film was produced entitled 'The = Ghost and Mr. Chicken'. There are scenes from this movie involving a = pipe organ in an old mansion. I've watched this movie many times, just = to listen to the organ. Every year around this time I wish I had a copy = of the organ piece that was played in the film. Is anyone on the list = familiar with this piece or know where I can obtain a copy? It would be = perfect for Halloween fun!
(back) Subject: Halloween Organ From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 17:57:17 -0600   Gary-   =20   I'm not the one who requested this, but if it isn't too much trouble, I'd like to have a copy, too!   =20   Daniel Hancock   Springfield, Missouri   =20   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Gary Black Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 5:50 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Halloween Organ   =20   HI bob, sorry to answer now but email me privately and i can send you a copy. thanks. Gary   ----- Original Message -----=20   From: Just Me Bob <mailto:rammer@zoomlynx.com> =20   To: PipeChat <mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org> =20   Sent: Wednesday, October 27, 2004 6:12 PM   Subject: Halloween Organ   =20   Back in the 60s a Don Knotts comedy film was produced entitled 'The Ghost and Mr. Chicken'. There are scenes from this movie involving a pipe organ in an old mansion. I've watched this movie many times, just to listen to the organ. Every year around this time I wish I had a copy of the organ piece that was played in the film. Is anyone on the list familiar with this piece or know where I can obtain a copy? It would be perfect for Halloween fun!  
(back) Subject: Re: Hammonds From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 18:00:42 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 3:05 PM Subject: Hammonds     > That's OK ... the local Hammond repair man is constantly getting frantic > phone calls from younger organists who walk in to play funerals (mostly > in funeral homes) and have no idea how to START a Hammond (chuckle), OR > where the "stops" are.   That actually works both ways. A few years ago New England organ builder constructed a new tracker organ for a church in West Virginia. After it = was complete he kept receiving constant complaints that the instrument would = not stay in tune. He went there once or twice and found nothing wrong with = the tuning. Finally in desperation he went to the Sunday service to see what was actually going on. He found that the organist, who had never played anything but a Hammond before, was trying to use the drawknobs like drawbars, pulling them partway out to get softer combinations.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Tenth Pres. (was Second to None) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 18:15:24 -0600   > On 11/01/04 at 7:03 PM Shirley wrote: > > > How about the Tenth Presbyterian in Philadelphia? > Actually, it's on Broad Street, the equivalent of 14th street. First > Pres. in Philly > might be in the Germantown section of town..... where Robert Carwithen > reigned > for many years. > > --Shirley, who occasionally sang in the choir at Tenth while an organ > student of Robert Elmore.   I believe this was Robert Elmore's last post, and that in those days they had a giant Allen, which I think was supposed to be the largest electronic organ in the world at the time. What do they have now?   Before that Robert Elmore was at Central Moravian Church in Bethlehem, = Pa., and before that at Holy Trinity (Episcopal) in Rittenhouse Square, Phiadelphia, where the Rector at the time was my wife's grandfather, the Rev. Harry S. Longley, D.D. This was famous as the church where Philips Brooks wrote "O little town of Bethlehem", and I think Lewis Redner who wrote the tune "St. Louis" may have been his organist there.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Halloween Organ From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 19:36:12 -0500   ditto for me as well, i'd love to incorporate that one into some of the = pizza music i occassionaly play...     Tom Hoehn, Organist Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes, Ellenton, FL (substitute - 4/42 Wurlitzer) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL (4/9?- = Rodgers/Ruffati/Wicks) Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS/VotS-ATOS/DTOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn=20 http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOUploads/ ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Daniel Hancock=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 6:57 PM Subject: Halloween Organ     Gary-       I'm not the one who requested this, but if it isn't too much trouble, = I'd like to have a copy, too!       Daniel Hancock   Springfield, Missouri       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf = Of Gary Black Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 5:50 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Halloween Organ       HI bob, sorry to answer now but email me privately and i can send you = a copy. thanks. Gary   ----- Original Message -----=20   From: Just Me Bob=20   To: PipeChat=20   Sent: Wednesday, October 27, 2004 6:12 PM   Subject: Halloween Organ       Back in the 60s a Don Knotts comedy film was produced entitled 'The = Ghost and Mr. Chicken'. There are scenes from this movie involving a = pipe organ in an old mansion. I've watched this movie many times, just = to listen to the organ. Every year around this time I wish I had a copy = of the organ piece that was played in the film. Is anyone on the list = familiar with this piece or know where I can obtain a copy? It would be = perfect for Halloween fun!  
(back) Subject: Re: Second to none? From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 19:59:00 -0500   Mea culpa. You're right. Now I have to figure out what that church is on = South Broad Street, on the East side of the street, just North of Pine (or maybe =   Lombard)......   --Shirley   On 2 Nov 2004 at 3:39, Jan Nijhuis expounded:   > Tenth is at 1701 Delancey Street > Surrounding streets: 17th, Spruce and (a bit to the west(?)) 18th.      
(back) Subject: Re: Halloween Organ From: "Just Me Bob" <rammer@zoomlynx.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 20:09:36 -0500   Hello Gary, Thank you so very much for your reply to my inquiry. I = would absolutely love to have a copy of this piece and would gladly pay = you for it. I sincerely appreciate your kindness. You may email it or = snail mail it, which ever is more convenient for you. Ill be looking = forward to hearing from you. Thank you again, Bob R. ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Gary Black=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 6:49 PM Subject: Re: Halloween Organ     HI bob, sorry to answer now but email me privately and i can send you = a copy. thanks. Gary ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Just Me Bob=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Wednesday, October 27, 2004 6:12 PM Subject: Halloween Organ     Back in the 60s a Don Knotts comedy film was produced entitled 'The = Ghost and Mr. Chicken'. There are scenes from this movie involving a = pipe organ in an old mansion. I've watched this movie many times, just = to listen to the organ. Every year around this time I wish I had a copy = of the organ piece that was played in the film. Is anyone on the list = familiar with this piece or know where I can obtain a copy? It would be = perfect for Halloween fun!  
(back) Subject: Re: Second to none? From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 20:12:49 -0500   Figured it out. It's Chambers-Wylie Memorial Presbyterian Church that's = located on S. Broad Street. Another teacher of mine, Leonard MacClain, was = organist there for a bit.   Sorry for the confusion.   --Shirley   On 1 Nov 2004 at 19:52, "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat expounded:   > Mea culpa. You're right. Now I have to figure out what that church > is on South Broad Street, on the East side of the street, just North > of Pine (or maybe Lombard)...... > > --Shirley > > On 2 Nov 2004 at 3:39, Jan Nijhuis expounded: > > > Tenth is at 1701 Delancey Street > > Surrounding streets: 17th, Spruce and (a bit to the west(?)) 18th. >        
(back) Subject: RE: Key wedges From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 21:33:34 -0500   It's pretty simple. Break the "end" off the pencil before inserting. That way they cannot break off in an unfortunate place. AjMead   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of cc Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 4:55 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Key wedges     I asked this same question on another organ list, and I was told to use pencils. Boy, I sure don't know how they ever get that to work! The ends just kept breaking off. I had my husband make me some little wood wedges, about one inch wide and an inch and a half long. They work great! I can usually play the keys next to the wedge if they are not played in repetition.   Carla C     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Jonathan Humbert" <jhumbert@ptd.net> To: "Pipechat@Pipechat. Org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 8:29 AM Subject: Key wedges     Dear Esteemed Colleagues,   One of the pieces that I'm playing for our December Holiday-music concert requires the use of 2 key wedges. My first question is this, where do I find and buy these said wedges? Not knowing exactly how these wedges work (I've been using folded-up pieces of paper to practice), my other concern is, do they allow the playing of a note immediately adjacent to one of the wedges? In other words, the upper wedge is on a B and at 2 points in the music I must play the C right beside it. Incidentally, the piece is Il Est N=E9 from Dale Woods' Christmas Pipings book. Any ideas and suggestions would be gratefully accepted. Thanks in advance, everyone!   Regards, Jonathan Humbert       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: Re: Hammonds From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 21:37:32 EST   Speaking of Hammonds, Keith purchased a Hammond clock several years ago at = a flea market. Lee  
(back) Subject: RE: Hammonds From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 15:45:33 +1300   >Speaking of Hammonds, Keith purchased a Hammond clock several years ago = at a flea market.=A0 Lee   I once bought a sandwich of Hammond Eggs ;-) Still, that's better than being Conned....... Ross    
(back) Subject: Sewing Machines and Organs From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 19:20:58 -0800   "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> said,   > I can't see a sewing machine and an organ as a good comparison. <   Why not? Both are tools of a given profession. Both can be used to render functional items as well as breathtaking works of art.   Both have had great masters, past and present, who have "composed" magnificent works for each respective machine.   Both have very similar histories and evolution, each having started as pure art (hand sewing : blowing into pipes), leading to purely mechanical action (foot-treadle sewing machines : tracker organs), then to "corruptions of the purity" with the addition of electric actions and then even more corruptions with "console assistants" (automatic fancy stitch selections, stitch memories, all sorts of attachments and accessories to enhance the art of sewing : swell boxes, combination actions, indicators, reversibles.... )   Both machines are often outfitted with console lights.   AND, both have opposing schools of thought -- those who shun any sort of modern enhancements in favor of the pure mechanical-action machine, and those who are not fearful of modern technology and welcome each new improvement and advancement.   I don't see how a more apt comparison could be drawn.         > I would go on, but I think this topic should go to rest. <   Why? What is this list for if not to discuss and POLITELY debate differences of opinion?     ~ C      
(back) Subject: Michael David lol From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 19:25:17 -0800 (PST)   Fritts Rodgers? NO hunny ! Fritts stands alone on its own without need = of help, and does JUST fine. Drop me a note off-list. I love my new setting. I have more choir to work with. They sight sang = Carol of the Bells last week in rehearsal and ended on pitch. 15 in the = choir and 90 in the congregation tells you something. The organ, while not = one I would call glorious, is certainly capable of getting the job done = pretty damned well. Its all pipe and ALL from ONE builder and ONE era.     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com/a
(back) Subject: Re: Tenth Pres. (was Second to None) From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 23:36:49 EST   Tenth President or Tenth Presbyterian?????  
(back) Subject: Re: Sewing Machines and Organs From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 22:45:11 -0600   Well, I see an organ as it progressed having actually caused damage to the =   instrument....mass producing, cheap materials, using technology to lower cost and standards. Although some are good, most are not. You can't go wrong with a tracker...but that opens a whole other story.   The sewing machine progressed positively over time. I don't know much = about it, but I'm sure it is a lot easier to use 21st century machines rather = than the old. I'd rather play an organ that has few pistons or an organ that only has an electric blower. You miss so much detail when you play these electric assisted organs. The player has no control over the pipe other than hoping that this magnet and that magnet function properly, that each key contact is aligned properly..etc. Details that I am sure the average =   person could care less about but some can hear and feel a difference. (I = do enjoy playing big organs, don't get me wrong.)   I could go on and on and on, but why? We all have our opinions. Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St. Champaign, IL 61820 217.390.0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net