PipeChat Digest #4871 - Tuesday, November 2, 2004
 
Sewing Machines and Organs
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: Key wedges
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
Key Wedges
  by "Jason M. Taylor" <Jason.M.Taylor@verizon.net>
Re: Sewing Machines and Organs
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
All Saints
  by "Shannon A." <musicnbooks@hotmail.com>
Re: All Saints
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Trilling with the 4th and 5th fingers
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Hammonds
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: All Saints
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: All Saints
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Hammonds
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
Re: Hammonds
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Clocks with synchronous motors.
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
RE: Small Organs...without shades.
  by "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net>
Hammond clocks with synchronous motors.
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Five Spirituals
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Five Spirituals
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Key Wedges
  by "cc" <belcanto@brainerd.net>
Re: Hammonds
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
Re: Hammonds
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Hammonds
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Hammond clocks with synchronous motors.
  by <Voicer40@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Sewing Machines and Organs From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 02:56:52 -0800   Dennis Steckley <kzrev@rr1.net> said, [in pertinent part]   =3D->   Generally speaking, the vintage sewing machines from say, 1950-1965 are considered the most durable ever built. And even many 100 year old treadle machines are still quite usable.   However, new machines, while they can be very expensive, and they do have lots of gadgets are NOT considered to be durable; generally speaking if they last ten or fifteen years that is considered normal.   <-=3D       Well, there's one viewpoint from what I actually supposed was actually just an apocryphal "sewing machine purist" when describing same in my previous postings.   Amazing.   There is so much to be learned about this world.   I still wonder, though, even IF vintage sewing machines are more durable (as are vintage vacuum cleaners and vintage mixmasters and vintage blenders and vintage automobiles and vintage just-about-everything-else you can think of), would Dennis deign to make a living selling them exclusively?   Or would he really care to make a living using these beloved vintage machines to turn out, say, industrial-size and -strength window drapes? Or, hmmmm, thick upholstery? Or banquet-size tablecloths adorned with fancy, elaborate stitching that a modern automatic sewing machine could turn out in a few minutes just by changing the stitch attachment?! Or a fancy Debutante Ball gown for his daughter (or neighbor's daughter if he hasn't one himself)?   And that's my point.   It's one thing to make a PERSONAL HOBBY of one's fixation for obsolete technology. Have all the old sewing machines you want. I am sure there are collectors with many hundreds of them.   I should know, and can speak of this without prejudice given my own peculiar fixation for vintage vacuum cleaners (which began when I was a toddler, by the way - to my parents' vexation I never outgrew it).   It's quite another thing to try to make a living selling ONLY "period-informed" machines, to the extent of foisting such a fetish on other people and dismissing those who would [more sanely, may I say] prefer to use modern, state-of-the-art machines. Even IF they may NOT last quite as long.   I'll close with the observation that a good friend of mine is a, well -- what do you call a "male seamstress?" A seamster? Or is that term anachronistic and too non-P.C.? Maybe something more generic like "seamperson" or "sewperson" or "sewer" ? Hmmm. Probably not the latter. Actually my friend does good-naturedly call himself a "seamstress." [You'd have to know him to understand.] Anyway, he has a brand-new modern rig that set him back about $1800, and he agrees it may be obsolete or worn out in 10-15 years. "If so, I'll get another one" is his reaction to that possibility.   Now then ....... I'll lay this, er, THREAD to rest now. If I haven't made my point by now, I'll never make it.     ------------------------   Come, come ye Saints, no toil or labor fear; but with joy wend your way.   Though hard to you this journey may appear, grace shall be as your day.   'Tis better far for us to strive, our useless cares from us drive;   Do this and joy your hearts will swell. All is well! All is well!   ------------------------   (I don't know why I added that; it just came to me for some reason. Great hymn.)       ~ C    
(back) Subject: Re: Key wedges From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 06:01:52 -0600   If you contact your local piano tuner he can give you some rubber tuning mutes we use to mute off strings. They come in various sizes. James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Creator of Handsome Hardwood Caster Cups (314) 608-4137 WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 BECOME WHAT YOU BELIEVE! pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message ----- From: "cc" <belcanto@brainerd.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 10:45 PM Subject: Re: Key wedges     >I tried that after the ends broke off, but then they were too big to fit > between the keys. I like my little wooden wedges. They work much = better. > > Carla C > > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 8:33 PM > Subject: RE: Key wedges > > >> It's pretty simple. Break the "end" off the pencil before inserting. = That >> way they cannot break off in an unfortunate place. >> AjMead >> >> -----Original Message----- >> From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of >> cc >> Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 4:55 PM >> To: PipeChat >> Subject: Re: Key wedges >> >> >> I asked this same question on another organ list, and I was told to use >> pencils. Boy, I sure don't know how they ever get that to work! The >> ends >> just kept breaking off. I had my husband make me some little wood >> wedges, >> about one inch wide and an inch and a half long. They work great! I = can >> usually play the keys next to the wedge if they are not played in >> repetition. >> >> Carla C >> >> >> ----- Original Message ----- >> From: "Jonathan Humbert" <jhumbert@ptd.net> >> To: "Pipechat@Pipechat. Org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >> Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 8:29 AM >> Subject: Key wedges >> >> >> Dear Esteemed Colleagues, >> >> One of the pieces that I'm playing for our December Holiday-music >> concert requires the use of 2 key wedges. My first question is this, >> where do I find and buy these said wedges? Not knowing exactly how >> these wedges work (I've been using folded-up pieces of paper to >> practice), my other concern is, do they allow the playing of a note >> immediately adjacent to one of the wedges? In other words, the upper >> wedge is on a B and at 2 points in the music I must play the C right >> beside it. Incidentally, the piece is Il Est N=E9 from Dale Woods' >> Christmas Pipings book. Any ideas and suggestions would be gratefully >> accepted. Thanks in advance, everyone! >> >> Regards, >> Jonathan Humbert >> >> >> >> ****************************************************************** >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >> >> >> >> ****************************************************************** >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >> >> >> >> >> ****************************************************************** >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >> > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >      
(back) Subject: Key Wedges From: "Jason M. Taylor" <Jason.M.Taylor@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 09:24:19 -0500   Why don't you get an old-fashioned cloths pin, break of one of the two = prongs, and use the piece that retains the knob.   Don't forget to stain it to match the console. If you really get = carried away, you could give it a couple coats of shellac.   Jay Taylor  
(back) Subject: Re: Sewing Machines and Organs From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 08:25:45 -0600   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 10:45 PM Subject: Re: Sewing Machines and Organs     > Well, I see an organ as it progressed having actually caused damage to = the > instrument....mass producing, cheap materials, using technology to lower > cost and standards. Although some are good, most are not. You can't go > wrong with a tracker...but that opens a whole other story.   When I see pipe organs built at different periods, whether they are = tracker or electric action, I see big differences in the quality between = individual builders that are probably bigger than the differences in quality between older and newer instruments. In terms of Victorian trackers, for example, you get some superbly crafted instruments by firms like Felgemaker and Durner, with others like Hook & Hastings, Hutchings, etc., not far behind. (I am not talking voicing here -- many would say Felgemakers were tonally rather uninspiring -- but quality and solidity of construction. On the other hand there were builders like John Brown of Wilmington, Delaware, whose instruments were distinctly cheap and nasty. The same was true in England, where early Hill and Willis organs, for example, though tonally fine, were mechanical rattraps, and it was only in the 1880's and 1890's that they really became quality instruments. Cavaille-Coll in nineteenth century France, and Skinner and even more Kimball in the twentieth = century, set new standards of quality in a world where many organs were poorly = built. Back in the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries many European builders used rather poor wood with lots of knotholes, etc., and it is only in the last century that they have been making an effort to use only the best wood available. This is to some extent offset by the fact that it is now = harder to get good old growth lumber. Because of the way metals are extracted = from their ores these days, modern pipe metal is too pure (and therefore soft), and the pipes often do not stay so well regulated. All the same, though, = I think the BEST pipe organs being built today are as good as anything that was ever made. So my point is that whatever period in history we are talking about there are good quality instruments using the finest = materials and poor quality instruments using cheap and inferior materials, and we = need to be descriminating in choosing between them.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: All Saints From: "Shannon A." <musicnbooks@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 08:31:24 -0600   Hi List, What's everyone playing for All Saints?   Shannon   _________________________________________________________________ Don=92t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search! http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200636ave/direct/01/    
(back) Subject: Re: All Saints From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 08:40:14 -0600   Music List for All Saints Sunday, November 7 2004     Prelude- "Elegy" George Thalben Ball   Processional Hymn- "O What Their Joy" O QUANTA QUALIA   Alleluia Verse- Setting by Robert Hobby (MorningStar)   Hymn of the Day- "For All the Saints" SINE NOMINE settings by John Ferguson; Handbell Ostinato by Hal Hopson   Offertory- "Jacob's Ladder" Simon Lindley Adult Choir   Communion- "Stay With Us" (from With One Voice, can't remember tune name)   "Remember Your Servants Lord" Russian Orthodox Chant,arr. Richard Proulx Adult Choir "Jesus, Still Lead On" SEELENBRAUTIGAM   Recessional- "Shall We Gather at the River" HANSON PLACE setting by John Ferguson (published by Augsburg; great "river" text painting!; optional tambourine GREAT!)   Postlude- "Festival" Healy Willan   Blessings, Beau Surratt Director of Music and Organist First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324     -----Original Message----- From: "Shannon A." <musicnbooks@hotmail.com> To: Pipechat@pipechat.org Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 08:31:24 -0600 Subject: All Saints   > Hi List, > What's everyone playing for All Saints? > > Shannon > > _________________________________________________________________ > Don=92t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search! > http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200636ave/direct/01/ > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >      
(back) Subject: Re: Trilling with the 4th and 5th fingers From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 08:56:40 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 11:36 PM Subject: RE: Trilling with the 4th and 5th fingers > michael - Bill Gates thinks "Noehren" should be spelled "Neoprene"   I just wrote a piece about French organ music and running it through the spellcheck program I get the following.   Nibelle's Carillon orleanaise should be "oreganos" The French organbuilder Mutin should be either "mutiny," "mutton" or "mutant." The composer Boely should be "belly," or "boil." The French organbuilder Callinet should be "clarinet," "calumet," or "carline." The composer Chauvet should be "chauvin," "chives," "Chaucer" or "caveat." The composer Benoist should be "benefits," "banjoist" or "boniest." Widor, of course, should be "wider" or "widow," and his Marche Pontificale should be "pontific ale," custom brewed. Dupre should be "dupe," "doper" or "duple." and Gigout should be "gig out."   Putting this together I come up with the following:   Nibelle decided to put oreganos in the mutton and brought it to the boil while he practised the clarinet that had been left the previous week by an itinerant banjoist. He left off to add some chives to the pot, and then, while it was cooking, went briefly to call on the widow next door. She = gave him a bottle of the pontific ale that the archbishop had sent her for her birthday. On his return, however, he discovered that the banjoist was trying to dupe him, having just returned from a gig out in Washington = state, and was attempting to steal the pot full of mutton from off the stove.   This was obviously what I had intended to say ...   John Speller            
(back) Subject: Re: Hammonds From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 11:04:02 EST   Ross, you are BAD. There is actually a Hammond clock that is made by the same company as the Hammond organ. We have it on the mantle and it is = quite a conversation piece. Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: All Saints From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 11:17:40 EST   I'm being " original" and playing the Vaughan Williams "Sine Nomine." Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: All Saints From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 11:30:41 -0500   Does anyone play the Sowerby =B3Requiescat in Pace=B2 any more?   Karl E. Moyer Lacnaster PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Hammonds From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 10:37:15 -0600   Hammond made his clock first before the organ James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Creator of Handsome Hardwood Caster Cups (314) 608-4137 WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 BECOME WHAT YOU BELIEVE! pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message -----=20 From: OMusic@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2004 10:04 AM Subject: Re: Hammonds     Ross, you are BAD. There is actually a Hammond clock that is made by = the same company as the Hammond organ. We have it on the mantle and it = is quite a conversation piece. Lee
(back) Subject: Re: Hammonds From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 10:44:09 -0600   At 10:37 AM 11/2/04, you wrote:   >Hammond made his clock first before the organ , We had a Hammond clock in our living room for years. As it was a true synchonous motor, as it was not self-starting and you had to spin a shaft on the back to start get the motor to run...as a kid I found that it would go backwards as easily as it would go forward = and I was often in trouble for reversing the clock   Jon.      
(back) Subject: Clocks with synchronous motors. From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 13:31:18 -0500   Jon, 'et al',   Back in the 1930's my father made a 24 hour clock with a synchronous = motor, which was unintelligible to the female members in the family.   I exacerbated the problem by making it go backwards! It caused me no end of fun to give them a load of grief! My father didn't seem to mind at = all!   Bob Conway     >At 10:37 AM 11/2/04, Jon wrote: > >>Hammond made his clock first before the organ >, >We had a Hammond clock in our living room for years. As it was a true >synchonous motor, as it was not self-starting and >you had to spin a shaft on the back to start get the motor to run...as a >kid I found that it would go backwards as easily as it would go forward >and I was often in trouble for reversing the clock > >Jon. > > >****************************************************************** >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: RE: Small Organs...without shades. From: "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 10:36:26 -0800   Biggsy very much so said it...side two of the Stereo version of The Organ...In Sight and Sound (1969) (Columbia Masterworks)   Mark S. Towne Sub Dean, Southern Nevada Chapter, AGO & Conclave Coordinator, Region IX 2006 Mid-Winter Conclave   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Scott Montgomery Sent: Saturday, October 30, 2004 10:30 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Small Organs...without shades.     E Power Biggs may have said it, but I heard M Barone say it on Pipedreams. So to clarify.....E Power Biggs said it, Barone quoted E Power Biggs on a Pipedreams show.   Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St. Champaign, IL 61820 217.390.0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Hammond clocks with synchronous motors. From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 13:45:13 -0500   For all who are determined to have a Hammond clock -- either in place of or as a companion to a Hammond organ, just go to eBay and you will find any number of them available, including one with synchronous motor in mint condition for $145.00. I think I will pass...   Steve Best in Utica, NY   >> >>> Hammond made his clock first before the organ >> >> , >> We had a Hammond clock in our living room for years. As it was a true >> synchonous motor, as it was not self-starting and >> you had to spin a shaft on the back to start get the motor to >> run...as a kid I found that it would go backwards as easily as it >> would go forward and I was often in trouble for reversing the clock >> >> Jon. >      
(back) Subject: Five Spirituals From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 14:27:25 EST   Does any one on the list play the "Five Spirituals for Organ" by Calvin Taylor? I've been working on them and they are some of the coolest = arrangements of spirituals I've played. They were comissioned by Marilyn Mason. = Calvin Taylor is from the Nashville, TN area--Bowling Green, KY--and holds = degrees from Oberlin, University of MI- Ann Arbor, and University of KY. If you = don't know the pieces, check them out...great settings. Monty Bennett Friendship Missionary Baptist Church Charlotte, NC  
(back) Subject: Re: Five Spirituals From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 14:35:34 -0500   Publication information, please.   Thanks!   Steve Best in Utica, NY   RMB10@aol.com wrote:   >Does any one on the list play the "Five Spirituals for Organ" by Calvin >Taylor? If you don't >know the pieces, check them out...great settings. > >Monty Bennett >      
(back) Subject: Re: Key Wedges From: "cc" <belcanto@brainerd.net> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 13:36:57 -0600   Very creative!   Carla C ----- Original Message ----- From: Jason M. Taylor To: PipeChat Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2004 8:24 AM Subject: Key Wedges     Why don't you get an old-fashioned cloths pin, break of one of the two = prongs, and use the piece that retains the knob.   Don't forget to stain it to match the console. If you really get = carried away, you could give it a couple coats of shellac.   Jay Taylor  
(back) Subject: Re: Hammonds From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 13:39:02 -0600   That is why it takes two switches to turn on a Hammond Tone Wheel Organ. James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Creator of Handsome Hardwood Caster Cups (314) 608-4137 WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 BECOME WHAT YOU BELIEVE! pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message ----- From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2004 10:44 AM Subject: Re: Hammonds     > At 10:37 AM 11/2/04, you wrote: > >>Hammond made his clock first before the organ > , > We had a Hammond clock in our living room for years. As it was a true > synchonous motor, as it was not self-starting and > you had to spin a shaft on the back to start get the motor to run...as a =   > kid I found that it would go backwards as easily as it would go forward > and I was often in trouble for reversing the clock > > Jon. > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Hammonds From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 16:39:28 -0500   On 11/1/04 7:00 PM, "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> wrote:   > He found that the organist, who had never played anything but a Hammond > before, was trying to use the drawknobs like drawbars, pulling them = partway > out to get softer combinations.   Anecdote surely nominated for SOME kind of prize in the stupid department.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Hammonds From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 17:14:43 -0500   Speaking of Hammonds, I just checked out one that a funeral home is giving =   away. This being my first time touching one, I wasn't sure what I was = doing and had some trouble making it do anything repeatably. I checked out the model number, but have already forgotten. H-something, I think. 25-note radiating pedal keyboard, 61-note manuals, external Leslie, as well as internal speakers. White/Black key stop keys on the left in addtion to = the drawbars. I was thoroughly confused; I did get it to make noise, but nothing I did made it sound like what I think of when I think "Hammond". = It is also unbelievably heavy, so I'm not sure how attractive it would be to = a rock band that has to move it around.   Thoughts from the Hammond experts out there? I have no use for it whatsoever, but I figured maybe someone might give me money for it, so I might grab it. I suppose in theory I could practice on it.   Andy     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond clocks with synchronous motors. From: <Voicer40@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 17:48:14 EST   Several years ago, I was tuning an organ in a church which was having a = flea market, and I bought a Hammond clock in mint condition for $0.50. It has = the shaft in back that has to be spun to get the clock running. I enjoy = having guests over to find the second had runing backwards.   D. Keith Morgan