PipeChat Digest #4874 - Thursday, November 4, 2004
 
Cor Anglais
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Hammond Model H
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: What do you play...
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
music for funerals
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: What do you play...
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: What do you play...
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Cor Anglais
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Cor Anglais From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 00:20:50 -0600   Sorry, but I cannot agree with this. If you have ever played a fine E.M. Skinner English Horn stop from the mid to late 1920s (or even an Austin = Cor Anglais, for that matter), you will know that the two stops you mention below simply cannot begin to duplicate the real thing. I can't imagine playing Sowerby's "Very slowly" from the Sonatina with what you suggest. Thou mayest continue to rant until the bovines return to your dwelling. Those who have ears, let them hear.   Robert Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: John L. Speller <jlspeller@swbell.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, November 03, 2004 10:12 PM Subject: Re: Hammond Model H     What worries me most > about today's organists is that many of them are incapable of doing this > sort of thing. They simply look at the music and if it says English = Horn > they have to have an English Horn. Most of them do not even know that = if on > many organs they pull out the Viole d' Orchestre with the Nazard they = will > get the same sound. This is why people today demand 150 rank organs, = and > even then do not know how to use them. It is about time they started > experimenting and listening to the sounds they make WITH THEIR EARS.\\ > > Sorry for the rant. > > John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond Model H From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 01:21:03 -0500   This is the amazing thing about the hammond... it is extremely user unfriendly if you think about it. It is amazing that anyone has figured = out how to play it! Maybe we Americans aren't as dumb as I thought, or at = least we didn't used to be.   Andy   > > > This latter is not really so. From my experience of Hammonds (which = was > back > > in the early 1960s but not since) if you want a decent 8ft flute, you > should > > on the drawbars pull about 4 or 5 on the 8ft, about 5 on the 4ft, and = the > > Larigot to about 1. > > Actually I used to spend much of my childhood doing the same kind of > thing with a pipe organ. The organ in the chapel of my decadent > English public school had a Claribel Flute. Actually the lowest > two octave of this were from the original Father Smith organ of the > early 1700's. But in any case the Claribel Flute and its bass had > been revoiced beyond recognition by a local hack builder in 1907. > To get any decent sound at all out of this at all one had to couple > it to the Choir Nazard with the box mostly shut, to add just enough > of the 2.2/3' to give it an interesting sound. Basically one is > doing the same thing with Hammond drawbars. What worries me most > about today's organists is that many of them are incapable of doing this > sort of thing. They simply look at the music and if it says English > Horn they have to have an English Horn. Most of them do not even > know that if on many organs they pull out the Viole d' Orchestre > with the Nazard they will get the same sound. This is why people > today demand 150 rank organs, and even then do not know how to use > them. It is about time they started experimenting and listening to > the sounds they make WITH THEIR EARS.\\ > > Sorry for the rant. > > John Speller >       A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: What do you play... From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 01:47:46 EST   People like to hear comforting, familiar music at a memorial service. I know, some of you will find these suggestions boring, but the service is =   for the family of the deceased, NOT THE ORGANIST!   Here are some starters...   Bach - Jesu, Joy Arioso Sheep may safely graze God's time is the best... All found in the E.Power Biggs = organ book.   Boellmann - Priere a notre dame   Mendelssohn - any of the "quiet" movements from the Sonatas   Consider preludes on favorite hymns of the family, or make up your own "medley" using the best sounds of the instrument you will be playing.   IMPROVISE if you are good at it!   CHIMES will make them cry!   Remember, you are setting the mood for a liturgical service, not = performing a recital.   These selections ( and many others) have worked for me for years. In fact, people write me into their WILLS requesting I play at their = service!   Within reason, GIVE THEM WHAT THEY WANT and you will be a success!   Justin   P.S. Don't forget to tell the Funeral Director what your fee is!  
(back) Subject: music for funerals From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 23:18:27 -0800   Bach - Sinfonia from "God's Time Is Best" Bach - Sheep May Safely Graze Bach - Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring Bach - Before Thy Throne (Great Eighteen) Bach - Out of the Depths (Clavieruebung III) Bach - Canzona in d minor Bach - Pastorale in F (third movement in c minor) Bach - Adagio (Prelude, Adagio and Fugue in C) Bach - "Little" Prelude and Fugue in e minor Bach - Dearest Jesu, We Are Here (various) Bach - When In The Hour of Utmost Need (Orgelbuechlein) Bach - Hark! A Voice Saith All Are Mortal (Orgelbuechlein) Handel - Dead March from "Saul" Handel - Aria in F (forget which concerto; it's in the Concordia Wedding Book) Krebs - Lord, All My Hope Is Fixed On Thee Walther - Jesu, Priceless Treasure (selected movements of the partita)   I much prefer the calm objectivity of Bach to just about anything else; but in fairness I have always been organist in ultra-high Episcopal churches or Roman Catholic churches, where the entire funeral liturgy is about praying for the repose of the soul of the deceased ... in fact, several of the normal features of the liturgy (the Kiss of Peace, etc.) are omitted BECAUSE it is a Mass FOR the dead, and not the living ... there's much less emphasis on subjective, emotional "stuff" ... "Grandma's favorite hymn," etc., UNLESS it happens to be appropriate to the liturgy. Otherwise it might get played before or after, but not = during.   And before you fire up your flame-throwers, as with weddings, those are the CHURCH'S rules, not mine (grin).   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: RE: What do you play... From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 20:36:48 +1300     [at funerals] >CHIMES will make them cry! =A0 I've often felt this a curious feature of the American organ scene - = theatre organ fake bells in a church organ. I don't know of a single church = organ in the whole of New Zealand that has chimes, nor can I imagine anyone ever wanting such a thing. How did your scene arise?   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: What do you play... From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 02:58:32 EST   clair de lune-vierne adagio mvmnts from widor franck PFV, pastorale adagio movements from bach and walther concerti bach trio sonatas bach preludes and fugues bach erbarm dich... french classical--a wealth for prelude and postlude material scarlatti sonatas bach WTC preludes       now speaking of rule breaking... there was a funeral at my church (UCC) some time ago--the lady that passed =   loved jazz...SO--me and a singer from the MET did two of her favs-Irish = Eyes and I'll be Seeing You-just like it would have been done at a club...everyone = in the church was crying...oh my gfc         Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Cor Anglais From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 04 Nov 2004 00:04:54 -0800   OK, you're BOTH right; BUT ... one learns to make do with what one has. On some organs, an Oboe + a 4' Flute will produce a nice English Horn-ish type sound.   Cheers,   Bud   Robert Lind wrote:   > Sorry, but I cannot agree with this. If you have ever played a fine E.M. > Skinner English Horn stop from the mid to late 1920s (or even an Austin = Cor > Anglais, for that matter), you will know that the two stops you mention > below simply cannot begin to duplicate the real thing. I can't imagine > playing Sowerby's "Very slowly" from the Sonatina with what you suggest. > Thou mayest continue to rant until the bovines return to your dwelling. > Those who have ears, let them hear. > > Robert Lind > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: John L. Speller <jlspeller@swbell.net> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Wednesday, November 03, 2004 10:12 PM > Subject: Re: Hammond Model H > > > What worries me most > >>about today's organists is that many of them are incapable of doing this >>sort of thing. They simply look at the music and if it says English = Horn >>they have to have an English Horn. Most of them do not even know that = if > > on > >>many organs they pull out the Viole d' Orchestre with the Nazard they = will >>get the same sound. This is why people today demand 150 rank organs, = and >>even then do not know how to use them. It is about time they started >>experimenting and listening to the sounds they make WITH THEIR EARS.\\ >> >>Sorry for the rant. >> >>John Speller > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >