PipeChat Digest #4875 - Thursday, November 4, 2004
 
"You play so loud"
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Hammonds
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
Re: "You play so loud"
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Too Loud?
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: "You play so loud"
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: "You play so loud"
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Hamonds ARE User Friendly
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
RE: What do you play...
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Music for funerals
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Re: Music for funerals
  by "James Edward Mackay" <ymcmlx@gmail.com>
Organ Preferences
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
My organ situation
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: What do you play...
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: What do you play...
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
RE: Hammond Model H
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: What do you play...
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
RE: Hammond Model H
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
RE: What do you play...
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Music for funerals
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: "You play so loud[ly]"
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Hammond Model H
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: "You play so loud"
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Hammond Model H
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Can you help me locate an album, "17TH Century Organ Music, E. Power Bigg
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
 

(back) Subject: "You play so loud" From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 04:59:59 -0500   Hi, colleagues,   When I was interviewing for my present job, the interview committee broadly hinted that I'd better be used to older people in the congregation complaining that I play too loudly. When I said "I really try not to do that," they replied that it didn't matter, it was a political issue rather than a sonic one. It had something to do with the battle they went through circa 1991 to replace their pipe organ and move it and the choir to the Chancel from the rear balcony. Evidently some people were against the whole thing, claiming that you didn't need music at all in order to worship, so what's the point to it all?   Sonically, I do try to do what we all do. I treat hymns as music, I think about registration, leadership, excitement without over-embellishment. I do listen to the congregation to try to judge how much support they want/need. I vary the verse registrations, not in a schizophrenic way, but restrained. I try not to be the main deal on hymns, but I do try to be a good contributor.   There has been a trickle (rather than a flood) of older people who, every three weeks or so, meander into the clergy's offices with "I'm not complaining, but, the organ is so loud I can't hear myself sing," Of course, strategic error number one: they never say a word to me about it. This alone causes me to discount them. But then I get to thinking, "What is the best way to deal with this?" Don't get me wrong, the clergy are excellent musicians and good managers, they relate these conversations in a dutiful but somewhat rueful way. They're very supportive and yet professional, which is why they feel they need to give me feedback. But you know how it is with the squeaky wheel. I feel bad that the clergy have to hear this over and over. I worry that they'll get so tired of it that the result will be that they tell me to play all hymns on General Number One (you know, that's the one where you punch it in a panic to play stringy background stuff at the 8-foot-only-pitch-level!) I know this won't really happen, but still....   Yes, I have approached older members of the congregation who have musical backgrounds. They say "Well, if they say they can't hear themselves sing, I'd want to hear how they're singing!" One older lady simply said "Buncha wimps!" I've approached musicians, I've approached retired clergy who worship with us (we have a fair number). I've talked to the choir (who sat in the congregation over the summer, I started July 1). I've gone into the room where the older ladies are folding and stuffing bulletins to ask them. They all come back with "No, it's fine, I like the way you're using the organ."   Anybody have any bright ideas or stock responses? I think I'm OK, but I'd like to try to do more than just ignore the whole thing.   Chuck Peery St. Louis    
(back) Subject: Hammonds From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 05:51:08 -0600   According to Bob Heil, local electronic guru and organist, who used to = play under Stan Kann at the St. Louis Fox, the last B-3's that were built were voiced a little brighter than earlier ones. He had a guest over who = worked for Hammond before they closed the tone wheels down and he explained how = he did this. Heil has several Rialtos wired together with a B-3. James James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Creator of Handsome Hardwood Caster Cups (314) 608-4137 WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 BECOME WHAT YOU BELIEVE! pianoman@accessus.net      
(back) Subject: Re: "You play so loud" From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 06:53:27 EST   well, advent is coming-i dare you to use nothing but the 8' diapason, for everything! see if they still complain-oh how christian churches can = be--what denomination are you working in? gfc       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Too Loud? From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 06:55:31 EST   It's a no win, when some people have their minds made up. I once played at = an RC church where I was supposedly playing too loud, too soft, too fast, and =   too slow--all at the same time. At another one where I subbed the priest threatened to fire me if he had one complaint that the organ was too loud, = never mind that the speaking mikes were way too loud and almost painful when the = priest got rolling in his sermon. And there are others who like full organ most = all the time. Go figure. Just do your thing tastefully and reasonably and try = not to let them get to you. David in DC  
(back) Subject: Re: "You play so loud" From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 05:56:15 -0500   Hi, gfc,   United Church of Christ. 3 manual 49-rank Schantz...   Chuck   On Nov 4, 2004, at 6:53 AM, Gfc234@aol.com wrote:   > well, advent is coming-i dare you to use nothing but the 8' diapason,=20=   > for everything!=A0 see if they still complain-oh how christian = churches=20 > can be--what denomination are you working in? > gfc > > > > Gregory Ceurvorst > 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS > Evanston, IL 60201 > 847.332.2788 home/fax > 708.243.2549 mobile > gfc234@aol.com > gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net    
(back) Subject: Re: "You play so loud" From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 06:58:26 EST     In a message dated 11/4/04 5:57:04 AM, cepeery@earthlink.net writes:     >=20 >=20 > United Church of Christ.=A0 3 manual 49-rank Schantz... >=20 > Chuck >=20 > On Nov 4, 2004, at 6:53 AM, Gfc234@aol.com wrote: >=20 > > well, advent is coming-i dare you to use nothing but the 8' diapason, > > for everything!=A0 see if they still complain-oh how christian churches > > can be--what denomination are you working in? > >=A0 gfc > > > > > > > > Gregory Ceurvorst >=20   im in the UCC too--they like to complain. gfc       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Hamonds ARE User Friendly From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 07:16:08 EST   >This is the amazing thing about the hammond... it is extremely user >unfriendly if you think about it. It is amazing that anyone has figured =   out >how to play it! Maybe we Americans aren't as dumb as I thought, or at least >we didn't used to be. >Andy   No, no, no, no, no! Hammonds are the easiest things to play...look how many untrained people = out there are playing them. So called "trained" organists look down their = noses at Hammonds, because they don't want to be bothered to learn a few quick =   things. It's much harder to sit down at a 50 rank Skinner or Kimball or = Moller or whatever, and figure out what works and doesn't, than it does to sit = down and flip two switches and know that everything is going to play. Registration on a Hammond is like cooking...a little of this, a little of = that. It's all done by harmonics. It requires a musician to use his or her ears, something that organists fail to do most times. In addition to the 4 manual pipe organ at my church, we have a Hammond Concert Model D 152. I play it weekly and have a ball with it. At home = I have a Hammond B3. I know of another listmember with two B3s in his possesion. = It takes about 2 minutes of experimenting and you get the knack of Hammond registration. Hammond technique, however, is another whole style of = playing, whether you're going to play Gospel, Jazz, Blues or whatever. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: RE: What do you play... From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 04 Nov 2004 06:47:15 -0600   Note to self: Remember NOT to ask Bud or Justin to play my funeral . . ..   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com (who has left strict instructions for no funeral - I want an organ recital from hell and a drunken brawl)          
(back) Subject: Re: Music for funerals From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 07:57:44 -0500   Not yet mentioned is the notion of interspersing favorite hymns of the deceased among slightly longer quiet pieces. For the few funerals I've played so far this has seemed to garner a positive response, and depending =   on the hymn can offer some variety in terms of dynamics as well. I'm not a =   very good modulator so I try to give some thought and planning to key changes so the overall 15 minutes or so doesn't end up sounding too = choppy.   If specific hymns aren't requested, I try to play some of the very = familiar old favorites (well, not exactly *my* favorites, but then again, it's not = my funeral <g>) like "Abide with Me" and newer ones like "How Great Thou = Art." I also incorporate hymns of a more robust nature like "A Mighty Fortress" and "O God Our Help." That's because I think an element of dignified gratitude both for the deceased's earthly life and the life to come should =   be incorporated, not just the usual sad, sniffly tremolo stuff we hear way =   too often.    
(back) Subject: Re: Music for funerals From: "James Edward Mackay" <ymcmlx@gmail.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 07:50:17 -0600   Every funeral I've played at gets at least one or two healthy doses of Easter music. In Christian denominations death is inextricably linked to resurrection.   I've only played a handful of memorial services at non-Christian denominations or other venues. For the secular memorial services I went with the quiet movements from Mendelssohn's organ sonatas. From what I've read, Bach wrote in G-major when he was happiest so I try to work in something G-major-Bach-like.   At Jewish funerals I've played I usually include great hymns of praise. I have a number of voluntaries on "The God of Abraham praise" and families commented that they were amazed at how 'happy' the funeral seemed.   Too, there are a number of transcriptions of traditional Scottish tunes (I've got a book of bagpipe transcriptions for piano).   At any rate, at memorial services I play there is always a sense of celebration: joy : grief ... 3 : 1.   And, at weddings there are always some voluntaries in minor keys. That ratio of joy : grief is also about 3 : 1. I always include something on the hymn "O man, turnback, forswear thy foolish ways" early on in the prelude music. I figure it's the last moment that the groom can run the other way. ar ar ar   J.     James Edward Mackay Fargo, North Dakota <organist@att.net> <ymcmlx@gmail.com>  
(back) Subject: Organ Preferences From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 04 Nov 2004 07:54:33 -0600   General Premises About Organ Preferences   1. If you have it, use it. 2. If you don't have it, do the best you can with what you have. 3. Either way, don't complain. 4. If you have the chance to get it, then sure, why not? 5. There's nothing wrong with preferring to have a REAL Skinner or Austin English Horn 6. Some people may actually enjoy both pipe and electronic organs. 7. One can play a very musical recital program on the most meager of organs. 8. Having 150 ranks can be A LOT of fun. Having 7 pipe ranks and 30 electronic "ranks" can be a lot of fun too, in fact, having only electronic "ranks," one can EVEN STILL make beautiful music that brings praise to God. 9. God loves equally those who build and play electronic, pipe, and Hammond organs or various combinations thereof. 10. Whatever you have or want, make beautiful music no matter what.   Blessings, Beau Surratt Director of Music and Organist First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324     -----Original Message----- From: Liquescent <quilisma@cox.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Thu, 04 Nov 2004 00:04:54 -0800 Subject: Re: Cor Anglais   > OK, you're BOTH right; BUT ... one learns to make do with what one has. > On some organs, an Oboe + a 4' Flute will produce a nice English > Horn-ish type sound. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > Robert Lind wrote: > > > Sorry, but I cannot agree with this. If you have ever played a fine > E.M. > > Skinner English Horn stop from the mid to late 1920s (or even an > Austin Cor > > Anglais, for that matter), you will know that the two stops you > mention > > below simply cannot begin to duplicate the real thing. I can't > imagine > > playing Sowerby's "Very slowly" from the Sonatina with what you > suggest. > > Thou mayest continue to rant until the bovines return to your > dwelling. > > Those who have ears, let them hear. > > > > Robert Lind > > > > ----- Original Message ----- > > From: John L. Speller <jlspeller@swbell.net> > > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > Sent: Wednesday, November 03, 2004 10:12 PM > > Subject: Re: Hammond Model H > > > > > > What worries me most > > > >>about today's organists is that many of them are incapable of doing > this > >>sort of thing. They simply look at the music and if it says English > Horn > >>they have to have an English Horn. Most of them do not even know > that if > > > > on > > > >>many organs they pull out the Viole d' Orchestre with the Nazard they > will > >>get the same sound. This is why people today demand 150 rank organs, > and > >>even then do not know how to use them. It is about time they started > >>experimenting and listening to the sounds they make WITH THEIR > EARS.\\ > >> > >>Sorry for the rant. > >> > >>John Speller > > > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >      
(back) Subject: My organ situation From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 04 Nov 2004 08:08:57 -0600   Hi! In thinking about all of this going back and forth about whether or not it is a sin to want a large and colorful instrument to play (some people seem to speak of it as though it is a sin!) I thought I'd put my 2 cents in by explaining some of the organs I've played and what I've thought about them.   1. My first church had a 4 manual wicks unit organ from 1946, I believe. I learned to play a church service on that instrument and even played a recital with a fairly varied program on it. I enjoyed that little 4 rank Wicks.   2. I've played services and recitals on other organs large and small, from the 4 manual Schlicker/Dobson at Valparaiso University to the little 7 rank portative also in Valpo's chapel, to the 4 manual, 1923, 43 rank Skinner at my former church. Do I play services differently on those various organs, of course. Did I immensly enjoy playing all of those instruments, of course.   3. As I mentioned, my former church had an unaltered 1923 E.M. Skinner of 4 manuals and 43 ranks. I LOVED the instrument and I made the best of it (with nothing above 4' on the great) However, there were things I like to to in playing a service that it simply could not do for whatever reason. Did I write the instrument off as trash because it couldn't do what I wanted? No. I MADE THE BEST OF IT.   The church I'm at now has a 3 manual Rodgers 927 ELECTRONIC ORGAN!!! AND I'M PROUD OF IT! I look forward to playing it every Sunday, and it can do almost anything I want as far as service or literature playing goes, and it doesn't even have a COR ANGLAIS :)   Would I rather have beautiful 150 rank pipe organ? Probably. Would I rather have a 4 rank tracker? In some situations, yes, but not in this one. Though, if I did, I'd enjoy it.   My point.....     There is no need in criticising "today's organists." There is a simple remedy to all of this: Organists, like everyone else, have different opinions.               Blessings, Beau Surratt Director of Music and Organist First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324      
(back) Subject: Re: What do you play... From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 08:15:46 -0600   Or as my wife, an Episcopal priest, puts it, "When people are dead there = is no point in trying to improve their taste."   John Speller=20 ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Justinhartz@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 12:47 AM Subject: Re: What do you play...     People like to hear comforting, familiar music at a memorial service. I know, some of you will find these suggestions boring, but the = service is for the family of the deceased, NOT THE ORGANIST!   Within reason, GIVE THEM WHAT THEY WANT and you will be a success!
(back) Subject: Re: What do you play... From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 08:54:59 -0600   Did you know... The Catholic church says in the GIRM (I think) that prelude and = postlude music is discouraged at funerals.   Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St. Champaign, IL 61820 217.390.0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net  
(back) Subject: RE: Hammond Model H From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 08:58:54 -0600     To an organist who has never sat down at a Hammond before, the presets=20 look like stops, but they're really more like combination buttons. Bgsx wrote:     " From "Playing the Hammond Organ" copyright 1941 The Hammond Instrument Company 4200 West Diversey Avenue Chicago 39, Illinois   page 14:   "Still keeping to the upper manual, depress the pre-set D by itself and notice that as you do so pre-set C# will return to it's "off" position.=20 Right here is an important thing to remember. TWO PRE-SETS AT ONE TIME=20 ARE NEVER USED! Should you make a mistake and get two down together, depress the low=20 C and they will be released."   In the book, the sentence "TWO PRE-SETS AT ONE TIME ARE NEVER USED!" is=20 in italics for emphasis."   That's understood--although by the time I was playing a Hammond growing up in my home church, there were no instruction books to be had. And the "organist" I learned from frequently used the presets in combination--and they worked! And so did the organ, too. You couldn't do anything to that old Hammond--it was so reliable. Which, to me, was its best and worst trait. You could always count on it, but I really wanted to see the church get a new organ, and they would never understand why they needed one, as long as the one they had was "perfectly good."=20   Ancient history, now.   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: What do you play... From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 09:00:44 -0600   The Ceremonial of Bishops, the most recent complete liturgical document = from the Holy See, instructs that the organ remain silent during Funeral = Masses, except to accompany singing.=20 There should be no flowers on the altar, and the music of the organ or = other instruments is permitted only to assist the singing. [#824]=20 Hence organ preludes and postludes should not be played.=20   Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St. Champaign, IL 61820 217.390.0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net  
(back) Subject: RE: Hammond Model H From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 09:01:06 -0600   Andy wrote:   "The drawbar concept is kind of cool when you think about it. It sort of=20 allows the organist to be the "voicer". I've sometimes wished I could=20 adjust the volume a bit on individual stops on the pipe organ! Maybe you=20 actually could do it with unit action and an expression box for every stop!"   I've often wondered what that would be like, myself!   Daniel Hancock  
(back) Subject: RE: What do you play... From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 5 Nov 2004 04:12:35 +1300   >Did you know... =A0=A0=A0 The Catholic church says in the GIRM (I think) that prelude = and postlude music is discouraged at funerals. =A0 I find this amazing. Do they give some kind of justification for their peculiar stance and does anyone follow their instructions?   For my part, music before and aft can make a great deal of difference to = how people feel. To play to listen to non-bravura music can be very helpful = to many people. The Orgelbuchlein and the Buxtehude chorale preludes are goldmines for music for before a funeral begins, as also much from the classic French school (even if, in the latter case, some of the Grand = Jeux movements are played gently on flutes).=20   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Music for funerals From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 04 Nov 2004 07:07:48 -0800     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 4:57 AM Subject: Re: Music for funerals     > Not yet mentioned is the notion of interspersing favorite hymns of the > deceased among slightly longer quiet pieces. >   > If specific hymns aren't requested, I try to play some of the very > familiar old favorites (well, not exactly *my* favorites, but then = again, > it's not my funeral <g>) like "Abide with Me" and newer ones like "How > Great Thou Art."   I frequently play Jerusalem the Golden (hymntune Ewing) on a single 8' Principal. I don't know whether it's familiar to many in the congregation = -- it's not in the UCC hymnal, alas -- but it's quite a noble tune.   MAF    
(back) Subject: Re: "You play so loud[ly]" From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 10:14:52 EST   I'd accompany alternate verses on the Viola and the Stopped Diapason. Keep the pedal line to a single 8' flute, preferably one that is duplexed = from an enclosed manual division. If this sounds too extreme, engage just enough resources for the choir members to get their pitch (a 4' Principal helps), = but let the congregation sink or swim. I know this sounds immature, but you are engaged in a battle with ignorant people. If they want to hear themselves sing, so be it. The = dispute might best be resolved through this type of "acquiescence" than through butting = horns. If there are complaints, your honest and thoughtful answer will be, = "This is what the parishioners demand. Mrs. So-and-so insisted on this, and she took the matter directly to Reverend So-and-so, and my hands are therefore = tied. If you can persuade them otherwise, I would be happy to return to making = music as I did before." You might sincerely offer the opportunity for the complainer to = perform an unaccompanied solo. They are likely to refuse, but if they accept, your = case is made. If such people are going to be manipulative and engage in petty power plays, let the chips fall where they may.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond Model H From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 04 Nov 2004 11:03:07 -0500   On 11/3/04 7:42 PM, "bgsx" <bgsx52@sympatico.ca> wrote:   > By the way, here's another kind of Hammond organ > Oddly, I found no clue as to who built it. Dr. Hammond himself, perhaps?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: "You play so loud" From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 11:04:45 EST   i knew an organist who, when told by older members that they didn't like = the trumpets he was using (the previous organist had not used them in 28 = years), his response was, "well, i'm going to give you the opportunity to get used = to them." don't know if they ever got used to them or not, but a few years = later the organ was doubled in size, with more new and louder trumpets, which he =   used frequently.   on a side note, one thing i enjoy doing is letting the congregation sing a =   stanza (sometimes the last stanza) a cappella. of course, it has to be a = hymn which they can sing blindfolded. but play the first phrase on an enclosed =   division with a few stops pulled, so that they can hear the support (as = well as begin the stanza together), then i close the shutters during the phrase & = let them continue. but i also warn the choir so they'll be ready to keep the congregation going. the first few times i did it, i got wonderful = responses from the congregation. my response to them was, "sometimes i just like to hear =   singing without the organ."   scot in spokane  
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond Model H From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 11:32:26 -0800   >On 11/3/04 7:42 PM, "bgsx" <bgsx52@sympatico.ca> wrote: > >> By the way, here's another kind of Hammond organ >> >Oddly, I found no clue as to who built it. Dr. Hammond himself, perhaps? > >Alan   That has nothing to do with the original Hammond organs or its inventor. I am not sure it was a particualr brand( it currently escapes me) but Virgil Fox owned the residence at one time but it was a failed venture, Details are in the bio on Virgil Fox: "The Dish". Some of my details may not be exact.   John V.  
(back) Subject: Can you help me locate an album, "17TH Century Organ Music, E. Power Biggs" released around 1973? From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 11:37:15 -0500   Can you help me locate an album. I believe it was called "17TH Century Organ Music" by E. Power Biggs and released around 1973. I had it on vinyl but haven't seen it in over twenty-five years. Jerry   Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Bat Arhonious Software, = www.chirpingbat.com