PipeChat Digest #4884 - Sunday, November 7, 2004
 
Re: FELIX HELL AT BOSTON SYMPHONY HALL
  by "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net>
Re: Virgil Fox Orchestral Recordings
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Organs and Organists Online Update
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
Undulants from C1 vs. C13: more misinformation
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
incomplete ranks
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Today's Music
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Yaw Hoo!
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Yaw Hoo!
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Today's Music
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Yaw Hoo!
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Hammonds
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Today's Music
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Yaw Hoo!
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Norwegian harmonium
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Celestes below tenor C
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Jarle's Harmonium
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Celestes below tenor C
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Hammond clocks with synchronous motors.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Norwegian harmonium
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: Celestes below tenor C
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Norwegian harmonium
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: FELIX HELL AT BOSTON SYMPHONY HALL From: "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net> Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2004 06:13:23 -0500   Ozawa left the BSO over two years ago to take up the post at the Vienna = Opera. The BSO has had just guest conductors for the past two years = until Levine was able to begin because of his many prior commitments.   I intend to go in today to the Open House and hear Felix and the newly = refurbished Symphony Hall organ. I can't wait.   Merry     =B4=A8=A8)) -:=A6:- =B8.=B7=B4 .=B7=B4=A8=A8)) ((=B8=B8.=B7=B4 ..=B7=B4 -:=A6:-=20   An excerpt from Robert Giddings "Musical Quotes and Anecdotes", published in Longman Pocket Companions:=20 "There let the pealing organ blow,=20 To the full-voiced choir below,=20 In service high, and anthems clear,=20 As may with sweetness, through mine ear,=20 Dissolve me into ecstasies,=20 And bring all Heav'n before mine eyes".=20 John Milton - Il Penseroso (1632).=20   Merry Foxworth Open Door Realty=20 Boston, MA 02131 =20 617 469-4888 x207 877 865-1703 toll free http://www.opendoorrlty.com/ ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Innkawgneeto@cs.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2004 6:00 PM Subject: Re: FELIX HELL AT BOSTON SYMPHONY HALL     under the patronage of the new Music Director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Maestro James Levine,=20   Did Osawa retire? resign?   I guess I was on Planet Zenon and didn't hear.   Neil Brown=20  
(back) Subject: Re: Virgil Fox Orchestral Recordings From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2004 08:43:46 EST   In a message dated 11/6/2004 11:33:42 PM Eastern Standard Time, Voicer40@aol.com writes: The Saint-Seans was recorded on an Allen (not the "Black Beauty") If this is true (and I still think that it was the Rodgers, BTW), it's no wonder that one person on the list quipped that it was the worst sounding = Rodgers he had heard...     RUNning and DUCKing for cover....laughing heartily out loud.(dressed in flame-proof cover-alls)   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Organs and Organists Online Update From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2004 10:06:18 -0600   Posted for John Foss, who is having Email difficulties.   This week's offering on http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ is the "Toccata Aurore" by Graeme Koehne, played by Mark Quarmby on the IV/53 Hill/LeTourneau organ in St Andrew's Cathedral, Sydney. This was taken = from a live BBC3 broadcast of Evensong from St Andrew's Cathedral during the Sydney Olympic Games in 2000. Graeme Koehne is one of Australia's most noteworthy composers, and there is a strong American influence in his studies. On the Australian Music Centre site http://www.amcoz.com.au/comp/k/gkoehn.htm I found the following:   "In the emergence of musical post-modernism, Graeme Koehne is one of Australia's leading figures. Thanks to a Harkness Fellowship in 1985, = Koehne studied at Yale University with Louis Andriessen and Jacob Druckman and studied privately with Virgil Thomson. His chamber opera Love Burns, to a libretto by Louis Nowra, was a highlight of the 1992 Adelaide Festival of the Arts, and showed off his predilection for the voice and for the stage. Koehne has received numerous prestigious commissions from the Australian Ballet (Nocturnes, 1914 and Tivoli), the Sydney Dance Company (The Selfish Giant and Nearly Beloved) and the Queensland Ballet (Once Around the Sun). The success of these works established Koehne's reputation as Australia's foremost composer for ballet. Koehne's music aims to reinvigorate the methods and techniques of traditional composition through its = re-engagement with musical vernacular and the diverse forms of popular culture. ...... = The high water mark of this period belongs to InFlight Entertainment, his masterful concerto for Oboe and Orchestra which was premiered by the Diana Doherty and the SSO in March of 2000 to thunderous acclaim."   Webmaster Timothy Grenz is giving a recital this evening in Menomonie, but = I hope he will also be able to upload the 2nd movement of the Guilmant = Sonata No 2 (not Symphony, as Guilmant Guru Agnes Armstrong reminded me last = week) played by David M Patrick on the organ in the Katarina Church in = Stockholm, Sweden, which has just arrived, when he gets back home! Good luck for the recital, Tim.   The recordings David Patrick made for AVS records at Coventry Cathedral of the complete works of Durufle and the Widor symphonies 3 and 6 came in the =   post on Thursday - I seem to be buying more records now than ever before. = Listening to them I can promise you I was not disappointed - thank you Gregory Cuervorst for recommending this. They are as good as you said they were!   John Foss      
(back) Subject: Undulants from C1 vs. C13: more misinformation From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2004 11:37:51 EST   Okay, folks... Can we refrain from spreading misinformation with sweeping generalizations that are simply known to be untrue? When will this stop? Out-of-phase, or undulating stops (often called "celestes" by = Americans, although many of them are neither French nor heavenly) are often seen as commencing at C13 in many instruments because this was the practice of Cavaille-Coll, with whom we tend to associate the Voix Celeste. However, there are many thousands of undulants around the world that extend 61, 68, or 73 notes, the full range of the manual soundboards. It = takes only a few minutes of research to find many, many examples from the 1920s = onward. At Temple Emanu-El, all nine undulants are 73-note ranks. Aeolian, Skinner, and Aeolian-Skinner, Casavant, and Kimball, were = among the builders who built full-compass undulants, although one often sees = such ranks descending only to G8 if budget and space are tight. Eliminating the bottom octave of such a stop saves about 35% of its = cost when made of zinc, and considerably more when made of alloy. Building an undulant without the bottom octave also saves on the additional cost of = racking those pipes. The drawbacks are obvious: the effect "drops out" at the bottom, and almost all organists like to couple their warm undulant down to the pedal, = where they have drawn either a soft 16' string or flute, and the absence of the undulant is noticeable. If funds are really that tight in an organ project, one might wish to provide toe holes in the soundboard for the future addition of the bottom = octave. American pipe organs are littered with plenty of Tenor-C toeboards, = and when one is rebuilding an organ, one may not be able to extend such stops, = even if one wants to.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/ ..  
(back) Subject: incomplete ranks From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 07 Nov 2004 09:32:37 -0800   While we're on the subject, can I put in my perennial plea for Nazards, Tierces, and Cornets to be built full-compass, PARTICULARLY if there's only ONE?   My second perennial plea: GO TO THE LITERATURE and see what IT requires.   IF you play French baroque organ music, you will see that the Tierce en TAILLE (tenor) is a popular registration. In addition, duos and trios often call for the nazard/quarte/tierce in BOTH hands, and the range of the left hand in Tierce en Tailles, duos, and trios OFTEN descends to the bottom C of the manual keyboard ... larger organs often included the GROS Nasard 5 1/3 on the Grand Orgue, and even the Gros Tierce 3 1/5 ... the growl of THAT against a fiery mounted cornet is one of the essential sounds of a big French baroque organ.   The Grand Jeu consists of Bourdons, Prestants, Nasards, Quartes, Tierces, (Larigot), Cornets, Trompettes and Clairons. That is a CHORUS combination, and Grand Jeu pieces DO use the ENTIRE keyboard compass, PARTICULARLY in the BASS ... if the Nazard and Tierce suddenly disappear at middle C or tenor C, there is a MARKED change in the COLOR of the = sound.   I'm not talking here about wimpy good-for-nothing out-of-tune unified American mutations borrowed from the Swell Gedeckt or Vox Celeste, or the Great Dulciana, or the "Dolce Cornet" so beloved of some builders of an earlier generation (though some of Hook's come damn close to being real Cornets). I'm talking about REAL mutations ... independent, tuned true, and able to color the Trompette and Clairon, and cornets that can start a fire on their own WITHOUT the reeds (grin).   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Today's Music From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2004 14:11:21 EST   Friendship Missionary Baptist Church Charlotte, NC November 7, 2004 Choirs: 7:30 AM Alive 4 Christ and Hymn Choir 9:15 AM Ladies Choir 11:15 AM Church Choir "A Service on Celebration of Worship" Holy Comunion Music of Preparation: Elevation (Tierce en Taille) Messe pour les Paroisses--Couperin Hymn of Praise: Holy, Holy, Holy--Nicea (Descant--Nolan E. Williams, = Jr.) Spiritual: My God's Not Dead, He's Alive (7:30 only)--led by Hymn Choir (Note: for those who don't know what a Hymn Choir is, they sing a capella =   Spirituals and Meter hymns, lined out in a call and response style--in the = country, many churches only sing this style of music, in the city, hymn = choirs do this--in the Black church, it's primarily more of a Southern thing, but it = preserve the Negro Spiritual in it's truest form, NOT in the "art" style, = but in the eerie, earthy, soulful, style in which the slaves sang them.) Hymns During Communion: 7:30 He Looked Beyond My Fault and Saw My Need At the Cross 9:15 Jesus Keep Me Near the Cross 11:15 He Looked Beyond My Fault and Saw My Need At the Cross Ministry of Thanksgiving (Offering): 7:30 Don't Cry --Kirk Franklin 9:15 Calvary --arr. Richard Smallwood 11:15 Lift Your Heads, O Ye Gates --Glenn Burleigh Hymn of Invitation to Christian Discipleship: 7:30 Trust and Obey 9:15 and 11:15 Hold to God's Unchanging Hand Postlude: Fanfare on Sine Nomine --John West  
(back) Subject: Yaw Hoo! From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2004 21:14:20 +0100 (CET)   I'm getting a pedal harmonium all for myself! It hasn't been in regular use for many years, but still plays like a charm. I'm gonna be the king of the town with this thing in my bedroom!   More seriously, I'm glad to be able to help preserve such an instrument. Not too many left... I guess I must be feeling like you adult organists who are getting a new organ for your church ;-)   - Jarle http://jarle.moo.no  
(back) Subject: Re: Yaw Hoo! From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2004 16:36:53 EST   can you tell us more about your new harmonium? when was it built, and by whom? what are the stops? do you have any photos of it yet?   scot in spokane  
(back) Subject: Re: Today's Music From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2004 15:53:45 -0600   Preludes: J=F3n Leifs--Praeludium (Op. 5, No. 1) William H. Harris--Prelude in A ("Combewater")   Choir: Mark Hayes--Soon I Will Be Done   Postlude: Robert Lind--Triumphal March (probably a world premiere)   If you haven't heard the Leifs Concerto for Organ and Orchestra (BIS -CD-930), you're in for quite an event. In contrast the short, early prelude I played today (available through the Iceland Music Information Centre, if no other way) is very agreeable and mild-mannered.   Robert Lind        
(back) Subject: Re: Yaw Hoo! From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 07 Nov 2004 14:10:39 -0800   Kewl! They're FUN. Just don't bump your knees on the reed box (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Jarle Fagerheim wrote:   > I'm getting a pedal harmonium all for myself! It > hasn't been in regular use for many years, but still > plays like a charm. I'm gonna be the king of the town > with this thing in my bedroom! > > More seriously, I'm glad to be able to help preserve > such an instrument. Not too many left... > I guess I must be feeling like you adult organists who > are getting a new organ for your church ;-) > > - Jarle > http://jarle.moo.no > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Hammonds From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 07 Nov 2004 17:17:59 -0500   On 11/6/04 8:06 PM, "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net> wrote:   > Second prize. Right behind a local sub who pumps the organ as she = plays. > Crescendo pedal and swell pedal. Alternating, of course. > Oh, that sounds LOVEly! (I have to grand first prize to your nominee!)   Alan, who once, too, had a parlor harmonium!           P.S.: That's just inCREDible!    
(back) Subject: Today's Music From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sun, 07 Nov 2004 17:18:51 -0500   Prelude: Elegy G. T. Thalben-Ball Offertory at 8:00 Great Is the Lord Michael Smith, arr. Lloyd = Larson (alto / tenor duet) Offertory at 10:30 Trio no 10 in B-flat, op. 189 Josef Rheinberger Communion Anthem: Holy Is the True Light William H. Harris Postlude: Prelude in D Minor Johann Pachelbel       Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Yaw Hoo! From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 07 Nov 2004 23:30:38 +0100   I don't know exactly when it was built -- probably in the 50's or 60's. The builder is "Vestres Orgel- og Harmoniumfabrik" of Harams=F8y, Western Norway. We already have a Vestres harmonium in our house bought by my grandfather in 1959, and this one is identical except for the pedals and electrical blower. Not very pretty furniture, but the sound is good enough for me! When I get it installed I'll put some pictures and stoplist on my homepage. Maybe even a recording...   This pedal harmonium was originally owned by the school "Solborg folkeh=F8gskole" in Stavanger, where my grandparents first met eachother. They're both alive and may be able to give some information about it. The school also had a 13-stop pipe organ which was recently sold to a lady whom I don't know. Its builder was Andreas Landrog of Haugesund, who worked in the shops of several US builders around 1900.   - Jarle http://jarle.moo.no   BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote: > can you tell us more about your new harmonium? when was it built, and = by > whom? what are the stops? do you have any photos of it yet? > > scot in spokane >  
(back) Subject: Norwegian harmonium From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 07 Nov 2004 14:54:05 -0800   Interesting that they were still being built that late ... or maybe not.   I bought a small folding Estey reed organ new sometime in the 1950s ... I think they stopped making reed organs shortly thereafter.   I DO remember seeing harmoniums in ITALIAN music catalogs in the 1960s, when I was ordering music for the Italian-language Mass at Holy Rosary in Cleveland.   It's a shame that so many were discarded in the US ... unless they get rained on, they're virtually indestructible ... I used to tinker with them when I was in high school. My little one had rubberized cloth instead of leather for the bellows ... I didn't know how to work with leather; rubberized cloth was easy enough. I had a large one-manual Estey that I bought in the 1950s and sold in the 1990s; the rubberized cloth bellows were still in perfect condition. Of course, neither organ was played every Sunday for church. I don't know how well it would have held up under heavy use.   In the old days, virtually every big old Roman Catholic church had a harmonium in the balcony, in addition to a pipe organ, in case of power failures, etc.   Schantz built one interesting PIPE organ for The Church of the Gesu in Cleveland that had a reed organ in the console ... it played from the Choir manual, and the treadles folded down on either side of the expression pedals. I don't remember if it had the usual knee-swells or = not.   Cheers,   Bud       Jarle Fagerheim wrote:   > I don't know exactly when it was built -- probably in the 50's or 60's. > The builder is "Vestres Orgel- og Harmoniumfabrik" of Harams=F8y, = Western > Norway. We already have a Vestres harmonium in our house bought by my > grandfather in 1959, and this one is identical except for the pedals and =   > electrical blower. Not very pretty furniture, but the sound is good > enough for me! When I get it installed I'll put some pictures and > stoplist on my homepage. Maybe even a recording... > > This pedal harmonium was originally owned by the school "Solborg > folkeh=F8gskole" in Stavanger, where my grandparents first met = eachother. > They're both alive and may be able to give some information about it. > The school also had a 13-stop pipe organ which was recently sold to a > lady whom I don't know. Its builder was Andreas Landrog of Haugesund, > who worked in the shops of several US builders around 1900. > > - Jarle > http://jarle.moo.no > > BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote: > >> can you tell us more about your new harmonium? when was it built, and >> by whom? what are the stops? do you have any photos of it yet? >> >> scot in spokane >> > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Celestes below tenor C From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2004 18:22:38 -0500   IMHO one full compass stop is worth several part-compass ones. Any stop worth having is worth _really_ having. I include undulants in this. I = have only experienced a full-compass celeste once, but it was so cool to be = able to use it in the pedal that I think it was worthwhile.   Note to builders and technicians (and organists overseeing organs) = however: If a rank is missing a bottom octave and there is no preparation for one, although it would be nice if the preparations had been made, it is usually =   possible to add it with an offset chest.   A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Jarle's Harmonium From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2004 18:54:54 EST   Jarle, can you tell us how responsive it is to touch, especially to repetition? "Free" reeds can be slow in speech, which makes them good for = imitating strings in the 16' octave, but I have heard that repetition can be a = problem with harmoniums. American free-reed organs from the late 19th and early 20th centuries have very sluggish speech and poor repetition. The French supposedly had a better handle on construction, and it also =   seemed to depend upon whether they worked by pressure or suction.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Celestes below tenor C From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2004 18:58:04 EST   Isn't it odd that Americans frequently demand two, three, or more sets = of undulating stops, but seem not to care if they are only of partial = compass? Would it not make more sense to have one or two complete ones than a = handful of incomplete sets?  
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond clocks with synchronous motors. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 07 Nov 2004 19:10:04 -0500   On 11/6/04 11:58 PM, "OMusic@aol.com" <OMusic@aol.com> wrote:   > You mean Keith's old clock is worth something? Maybe I'll let him keep i= t > when we move -- that's right -- we're moving to the great town of Chicka= sha, > Oklahoma, population 15,000, with a church on every corner and no piano t= uner > or organ voicer. Besides, we will be retired (officially) and spend as m= uch > time as we can afford traveling. Lee   Oh, my goodness, Lee. You guys have simply just GOT to settle down SOMEwhere, especially in consideration of your large family! (But do not speak of =B3letting him=B2 keep a clock, for Pete=B9s sake!=8BI=B9m sure you were kidding! Who CARES whether it=B9s worth anything?)   Keep us posted!   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Norwegian harmonium From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Mon, 8 Nov 2004 08:14:14 +0800   Italian reed organs were available into the 1960s. They were made by Farfisa. One of our churches bought one. Bob Elms ----- Original Message ----- From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 08, 2004 6:54 AM Subject: Norwegian harmonium     > Interesting that they were still being built that late ... or maybe not. >    
(back) Subject: RE: Celestes below tenor C From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 8 Nov 2004 13:30:54 +1300     >IMHO one full compass stop is worth several part-compass ones. Any stop worth having is worth _really_ having. I include undulants in this. I = have   only experienced a full-compass celeste once, but it was so cool to be = able to use it in the pedal that I think it was worthwhile.   In the UK recently, I played an organ that had a GGG compass on the Great, yet the Swell went down only to TenF. Having heard the organist use this instrument for a service, and having tried it myself, I can assure you = that that short-compass Swell is worth its weight in gold for trios, chorale prelude and classic French solos, in fact a huge variety of things. Far = far better to have that than another couple of stops on an already excellent Great.   >Note to builders and technicians (and organists overseeing organs) = however:   If a rank is missing a bottom octave and there is no preparation for one, although it would be nice if the preparations had been made, it is usually =   possible to add it with an offset chest.   This latter is very true. No trouble at all adding bottom octaves with a non-slider chest. If it is a slider chest, you can generally bore through the chest and use up-coming wind to fire an action to an off-set chest, winding the pipes on that through an extra trunk. Works well. Seen it a number of times.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Norwegian harmonium From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Sun, 7 Nov 2004 19:06:17 -0600   Harmoniums play with pressure. American reed organs with vacuum. I have restored both. Quite a different instrument. Roy Redman ----- Original Message -----=20 From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, November 07, 2004 4:54 PM Subject: Norwegian harmonium     > Interesting that they were still being built that late ... or maybe not. > > I bought a small folding Estey reed organ new sometime in the 1950s ... > I think they stopped making reed organs shortly thereafter. > > I DO remember seeing harmoniums in ITALIAN music catalogs in the 1960s, > when I was ordering music for the Italian-language Mass at Holy Rosary > in Cleveland. > > It's a shame that so many were discarded in the US ... unless they get > rained on, they're virtually indestructible ... I used to tinker with > them when I was in high school. My little one had rubberized cloth > instead of leather for the bellows ... I didn't know how to work with > leather; rubberized cloth was easy enough. I had a large one-manual > Estey that I bought in the 1950s and sold in the 1990s; the rubberized > cloth bellows were still in perfect condition. Of course, neither organ > was played every Sunday for church. I don't know how well it would have > held up under heavy use. > > In the old days, virtually every big old Roman Catholic church had a > harmonium in the balcony, in addition to a pipe organ, in case of power > failures, etc. > > Schantz built one interesting PIPE organ for The Church of the Gesu in > Cleveland that had a reed organ in the console ... it played from the > Choir manual, and the treadles folded down on either side of the > expression pedals. I don't remember if it had the usual knee-swells or not. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > > Jarle Fagerheim wrote: > > > I don't know exactly when it was built -- probably in the 50's or 60's. > > The builder is "Vestres Orgel- og Harmoniumfabrik" of Harams=F8y, Weste= rn > > Norway. We already have a Vestres harmonium in our house bought by my > > grandfather in 1959, and this one is identical except for the pedals an= d > > electrical blower. Not very pretty furniture, but the sound is good > > enough for me! When I get it installed I'll put some pictures and > > stoplist on my homepage. Maybe even a recording... > > > > This pedal harmonium was originally owned by the school "Solborg > > folkeh=F8gskole" in Stavanger, where my grandparents first met eachothe= r. > > They're both alive and may be able to give some information about it. > > The school also had a 13-stop pipe organ which was recently sold to a > > lady whom I don't know. Its builder was Andreas Landrog of Haugesund, > > who worked in the shops of several US builders around 1900. > > > > - Jarle > > http://jarle.moo.no > > > > BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote: > > > >> can you tell us more about your new harmonium? when was it built, and > >> by whom? what are the stops? do you have any photos of it yet? > >> > >> scot in spokane > >> > > > > ****************************************************************** > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > >   >