PipeChat Digest #4886 - Monday, November 8, 2004
 
RE: Norwegian harmonium
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Harmonium specs
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Jarle's Harmonium
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
Re: Norwegian harmonium
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Jarle's Harmonium
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Norwegian harmonium From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Mon, 8 Nov 2004 09:14:13 -0000   And I believe I'm right in saying that American reed organs (known here = in the UK simply as American Organs) have a reservoir for the wind- or = rather vacuum supply whereas Harmoniums (Harmonia?) have no reservoir and = therefore only play when one pedal is moving downwards. They need much more skill = in pumping, because if one foot reaches the bottom before the other has = started downwards the sound stops- giving a rather halting wheezy rendition of = the music!   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Roy Redman Sent: 08 November 2004 01:06 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Norwegian harmonium   Harmoniums play with pressure. American reed organs with vacuum. I = have restored both. Quite a different instrument. Roy Redman ----- Original Message -----=20 From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, November 07, 2004 4:54 PM Subject: Norwegian harmonium     > Interesting that they were still being built that late ... or maybe = not. > > I bought a small folding Estey reed organ new sometime in the 1950s = .... > I think they stopped making reed organs shortly thereafter. > > I DO remember seeing harmoniums in ITALIAN music catalogs in the = 1960s, > when I was ordering music for the Italian-language Mass at Holy Rosary > in Cleveland. > > It's a shame that so many were discarded in the US ... unless they get > rained on, they're virtually indestructible ... I used to tinker with > them when I was in high school. My little one had rubberized cloth > instead of leather for the bellows ... I didn't know how to work with > leather; rubberized cloth was easy enough. I had a large one-manual > Estey that I bought in the 1950s and sold in the 1990s; the rubberized > cloth bellows were still in perfect condition. Of course, neither = organ > was played every Sunday for church. I don't know how well it would = have > held up under heavy use. > > In the old days, virtually every big old Roman Catholic church had a > harmonium in the balcony, in addition to a pipe organ, in case of = power > failures, etc. > > Schantz built one interesting PIPE organ for The Church of the Gesu in > Cleveland that had a reed organ in the console ... it played from the > Choir manual, and the treadles folded down on either side of the > expression pedals. I don't remember if it had the usual knee-swells or not. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > > Jarle Fagerheim wrote: > > > I don't know exactly when it was built -- probably in the 50's or = 60's. > > The builder is "Vestres Orgel- og Harmoniumfabrik" of Harams=F8y, = Western > > Norway. We already have a Vestres harmonium in our house bought by = my > > grandfather in 1959, and this one is identical except for the pedals = and > > electrical blower. Not very pretty furniture, but the sound is good > > enough for me! When I get it installed I'll put some pictures and > > stoplist on my homepage. Maybe even a recording... > > > > This pedal harmonium was originally owned by the school "Solborg > > folkeh=F8gskole" in Stavanger, where my grandparents first met = eachother. > > They're both alive and may be able to give some information about = it. > > The school also had a 13-stop pipe organ which was recently sold to = a > > lady whom I don't know. Its builder was Andreas Landrog of = Haugesund, > > who worked in the shops of several US builders around 1900. > > > > - Jarle > > http://jarle.moo.no > > > > BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote: > > > >> can you tell us more about your new harmonium? when was it built, = and > >> by whom? what are the stops? do you have any photos of it yet? > >> > >> scot in spokane > >> > > > > ****************************************************************** > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related = topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > >   >=20   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Harmonium specs From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 08 Nov 2004 10:10:42 +0100   Both the pedal harmonium I'm getting and my grandfather's old instrument operate on suction, as far as I can tell. They're similar to (although somewhat larger than) the relatively cheap instruments that were immensely popular in schools, churches, and bethels until the mass-produced pianos mostly took their place in the 60's and 70's. Also, the stoplists of French pressure-harmoniums are, according to my Norwegian music encyclopedia, much more "French-symphonic" in character.   Andrew: Even though my e-mail address is .co.uk I'm a Norwegian living in South-Western Norway. When I registered my Yahoo Mail many years ago ..no addresses weren't available, so I chose the second-best thing ;-)   Here's the specs of the 195? Vestre I've been having fun with since my grandparents moved to a small apartment a few years ago and gave us their harmonium. It's amazingly robust; I doubt it has been tuned at all since 1959! The pedal harmonium is identical except for the electrical blower and pedals:   ------------------------------------------------------------------ Builder: Vestres Orgel- og Pianofabrikk, Harams=F8y (=C5lesund, Norway) "Favorit Model 20" Retail price 3860 NOK, bought used for 3000 NOK in 1959.   (Stops listed from left to right): ------------------------------------------------------------------ Bass koppel [BK] (sub coupler, F-e) =C6ols harpe 2' [6] (FF-a) Cornettino 2' [6p] (FF-a) (a is broken) Viola 4' [3] (FF-a) Viola dolce 4' [3p] (probably FF-a, doesn't work at all) Cello 8' [4] (FF-a) Diapason 8' [1] (FF-a) Diapason dolce 8' [1p] (FF-a) Bordun 16' [2] (FF-a) (FF-AA on 8' pitch, not borrowed) Subbass 16' [7] (FF-c) (FF-AA on 8' pitch, not borrowed) ------------------------------------------------------------------ Vox humana (really a tremulant) Klarinette 16' [2] (bb-f''') Hohlfl=F8yte 8' [1p] (bb-f''') Melodia 8' [1] (bb-f''') Vox coelestis 8' [5] (bb-f''') Violin 8' [4p] (bb-f''') =C6ols harpe 8' [9] (bb-f''') Schalmey 8' [4] (bb-f''') (e'''-f''' are broken) Fl=F8yte 4' [3] (bb-f''') Diskant koppel [DK] (super coupler, f-f'') ------------------------------------------------------------------ Two knee levers: Left knee operates a mechanical crescendo which includes everything except for the 2' stops. Right knee operates a "swell shutter" affecting the whole instrument. ------------------------------------------------------------------  
(back) Subject: Re: Jarle's Harmonium From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Mon, 8 Nov 2004 04:07:01 -0500   Last February there was a Pipedreams edition on Harmoniums and Reed Organs entitled "Reed My Lips". You can hear it at http://pipedreams.publicradio.org/listings/shows04_02.htm   Jerry Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Bat Arhonious Software, = www.chirpingbat.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Norwegian harmonium From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 08 Nov 2004 10:41:51 +0100   Seems correct to me. My harmonium(soon to be -s!) has such a reservoir. It can be used as a kind of expression, especially when improvising in modern style ;-)   - Jarle http://jarle.moo.no   Will Light wrote: > And I believe I'm right in saying that American reed organs (known here = in > the UK simply as American Organs) have a reservoir for the wind- or = rather > vacuum supply whereas Harmoniums (Harmonia?) have no reservoir and = therefore > only play when one pedal is moving downwards. They need much more skill = in > pumping, because if one foot reaches the bottom before the other has = started > downwards the sound stops- giving a rather halting wheezy rendition of = the > music! > > Will Light > Coventry UK  
(back) Subject: Re: Jarle's Harmonium From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 08 Nov 2004 10:45:56 +0100   Hi Sebastian,   The touch is pretty deep, yet light and not at all sluggish. Playing fast is relatively difficult.   I've heard of some Norwegian harmoniums repeating like harpsichords (!). Don't know what kind, but I can try to find out.   - Jarle http://jarle.moo.no   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > Jarle, can you tell us how responsive it is to touch, especially to > repetition? "Free" reeds can be slow in speech, which makes them good = for imitating > strings in the 16' octave, but I have heard that repetition can be a = problem with > harmoniums. > American free-reed organs from the late 19th and early 20th = centuries > have very sluggish speech and poor repetition. > The French supposedly had a better handle on construction, and it = also > seemed to depend upon whether they worked by pressure or suction. > > Sebastian M. Gluck > New York City >