PipeChat Digest #4890 - Wednesday, November 10, 2004
 
OHTA Conference 2004
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: French harmoniums and harmonium music
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: thank you from Burgie and Bud
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: French harmoniums and harmonium music
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
harmoniums, reed organs
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: last sunday's music
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
Re: Wistful Bud - Peaceful Bud
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
RE: harmoniums, reed organs
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
harmonium registration
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
harmonium registration
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: harmonium registration
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: harmonium registration
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: OHTA Conference 2004 From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 23:00:45 +0800   Some time ago I posted a bulletin about the 2004 Organ Historical Trust of =   Australia Conference held in Perth Western Australia at the end of = September 2004. A collection of photographs of organs with stoplists and some historical details can be found at http://home.vicnet.net.au/~ohta/   Click on the Conference 2004 title at the right hand side of the home = page. You will find some interesting instrument pictured and described there. Bob Elms.    
(back) Subject: RE: French harmoniums and harmonium music From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 09:07:43 -0600   =20   =20   Dupre mentions in his "Reminiscences" that Guilmant played the harmonium     for his First Communion Mass ... there are some manuals-only pieces in=20   the various Guilmant collections; is anybody aware of a collection of=20   Guilmant harmonium music that I might have missed? Or is it more likely=20   that Guilmant simply improvised?   =20   Cheers,   =20   Bud   =20   Guilmant wrote a few things for the harmonium, and many for either the harmonium or pipe organ. In some of those collections, the pedal is clearly marked on the two staves, and in playing those pieces on a manuals-only instrument, one finds that it is possible to play the entire piece, hands only. Many other French composers, including Vierne and Langlais, had similar collections. =20   =20   I have a Farrand & Votey 1 manual "Guilmant" model reed organ from 1903 (though it was first produced in the 1890's). It is an instrument of truly impressive tonality, and I find that the instrument works beautifully for much of this French music for "harmonium ou orgue."   =20   The instrument itself (that is, that model) was designed and produced by Farrand & Votey shortly after Guilmant's first American recital in 1893 at the Chicago World's Fair. That premier recital was on a Farrand & Votey 3 manual pipe organ. Probably due to the stir that his playing caused, F & V decided to capitalize on the name, and produced the "Guilmant" model reed organ, an instrument that had a complex action to facilitate the use of large-scale reeds (reeds that consequently wouldn't fit in normal-sized cells directly under the keys). As a result of the large-scale reeds, the individual sets of reeds produce tones that are much fuller and rounder than one would generally expect from a reed organ. =20   =20   I find that this instrument has a specification similar enough to a French harmonium (although it is a suction instrument, and the expression stops are non-existent, I can somewhat modify the volume with pumping technique). French harmonium music has registration nomenclature (generally numbers that represented stops in circles) and these correspond quite nicely to the tonal resources of my reed organ. =20   =20   It is rather satisfying to play this kind of music on a sort of American counterpart to the harmonium-this instrument being much more tonally developed than the average "parlor" or even "chapel" reed organs.   =20   You'll find too, these collections for "harmonium ou orgue" are admirably adaptable to modern pipe or digital organs.   =20   For those who might be interested, the specs of the "Guilmant" model follow the signature line.   =20   Daniel Hancock   Springfield, Missouri   =20   Farrand & Votey "Guilmant" model reed organ: one manual, five octaves.   =20   BASS (to tenor b) TREBLE (from middle c) =20   =20   16' Subbass (lowest octave only)   16' Bourdon Bass 16' Bourdon Treble   8' Diapason 8' Melodia (this, combined with the Dulciana, form the=20   8' Dolce (muted Diapason) 8' Dulciana continuation of the Diapason)   4' Viola 4' Flute (continuation of Viola)   4' Viola Dolce (muted Viola) 8' Gamba   8' Celeste (draws the Gamba and Dulciana)   Octave Coupler 8' Oboe=20   Vox Humana (fan-type Tremulant, acts only on 4' Flute, 8' Gamba, and 8' Oboe)   =20   Left Knee Swell: Grand Orgue (acts as crescendo and gradually draws stops to full organ)   Right Knee Swell: Expression (opens swell shades in front of reed sets)   =20   =20   =20   =20  
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: thank you from Burgie and Bud From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 10:12:16 -0500   On 11/9/04 12:52 PM, "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > We're here, and there are at least PATHS to everything essential > (chuckle). The new place is a lot nicer, quieter, AND cheaper.   Terribly glad for the cheerful words.   I too have had to give up driving, but I have a friend who still does (in a pretty new Cadillac), so I get around when I must. Yesterday I went into Manhattan for a few hours (a rare event except for Sunday morning)=8Bby taxi and subway and four blocks on the Canadian crutches. Pretty well wiped me out; I went to bed at 5:30 p.m.   72-1/2 is not as pleasant as I once dreamed it might be; but, then, on the other hand, when I was half this age I was pretty sure that 40 would probably be the last number on my odometer!   Details on =B3where=B2 in San Diego you are? And what the house is =B3like=B2?   Alan          
(back) Subject: RE: French harmoniums and harmonium music From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 07:28:18 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Now, wasn't the Faure Requiem written with a harmonium in the scoring?   Grey matter stirs and all that!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote:   > > Guilmant wrote a few things for the harmonium, and > many for either the > harmonium or pipe organ.   > Many other French > composers, including Vierne > and Langlais, had similar collections. >       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: harmoniums, reed organs From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 08:12:41 -0800   One of the problems in transferring French harmonium music to American reed organs is the location of the break between the treble and bass stops ... French harmoniums break between b and middle c; most American reed organs break between tenor e-f.   The other problem is the compass ... most American reed organs, except the two-manual ones, have F-compass keyboards; most French harmoniums are C-compass.   If someone has the Kalmus edition of Franck's L'Organiste handy, it would be helpful to post the translation of the registration numbers as found in the Preface. I can never remember it.   The basic stops, though, are:   Foundation tone 16-8-(4) Reed tone 16-8-(4) (Voix Celeste 8') (treble only)   Franck often writes for the right hand on 16' foundation tone in the upper part of the keyboard, and 4' reed tone in the left hand in the lower part of the keyboard. This creates the effect of solo-and-accompaniment at 8' on two manuals.   So when one plays the harmonium pieces on a pipe organ, one can either play them as written, but on two manuals with the appropriate stops (if they're available and balance properly), or transpose the right hand DOWN an octave and the left hand UP an octave (still on two manuals) and play the pieces with the appropriate 8' stops.   I did some hunting around to try and find the stop-list of a typical 2-manual Mustel. It appears that they basically had the same stops, but not always divided (?), and placed the reed-tone 16-8-4 on the upper manual, and the foundation tone 16-8-4 on the lower manual, with an intermanual coupler.   The one pic I found of a two-manual and PEDAL Mustel was SCARY (chuckle):   http://www.musica-stnazaire.com/dossiers/harmuni2.htm   .... it's HUGE ... unlike American two-manual and pedal reed organs, the reed-box for the Pedale is in a huge box UNDER the console, and forms a platform for it. There are three separate expression shoes: Recit, Grand Orgue, and Pedale; and multiple foot-levers (couplers, tremulant, full organ?). The stop-list is the same: reeds 16-8-4 + Voix Celeste on the upper manual, foundations 16-8-4 (called Bourdon and Flute) on the lower manual, plus Bourdon 16-8 in the Pedal.   French harmoniums, unlike American reed organs, seem to avoid using the names "Montre" or "Diapason" ... the foundation tone is variously called "Flute" or "Violoncello."   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: last sunday's music From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 11:15:58 -0500   The Faur=E9 Pie Jesu anthem--was it the solo or some choir arrangement I=20 don't know about?   Ross Coulson "Cole" Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA   Steve wrote: >Communion Anthem: Pie Jesu (Requiem, G. Faure)    
(back) Subject: Re: Wistful Bud - Peaceful Bud From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 12:00:23 EST   In a message dated 11/9/2004 7:14:04 PM Central Standard Time, quilisma@cox.net writes: Wistful, maybe ... I'll never get to hear a choir sing all the lovely music I've written or transcribed since I retired (grin) ... I have to be content with Sibelius playback and a vivid imagination. BUD, many can identify, vividly. However, there is hope smiling brightly before those of us who believe in life eternal . . . surely throughout = eternity (being FOREVER) the wothiest offerings of our earthly, musical creations = will have place amongst the saints and angels when, at last, our spirits soar = to the heavenly promise of GOD. Don't be in any hurry!!! You're encouraging a = host of folks on Earth each and every day: many, many more than you can = possibly know.   Peace!   Dale Rider Independence, MO USA  
(back) Subject: RE: harmoniums, reed organs From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 13:12:46 -0600   Bud writes:   =20   "One of the problems in transferring French harmonium music to American=20   reed organs is the location of the break between the treble and bass=20   stops ... French harmoniums break between b and middle c; most American=20   reed organs break between tenor e-f.   =20   The other problem is the compass ... most American reed organs, except=20   the two-manual ones, have F-compass keyboards; most French harmoniums=20   are C-compass."   =20   You're right, Bud (as usual!) this is a problem. But there is a class of American instruments that do fit the bill admirably well, complete with treble/bass break between b and middle c; and with the five-octave C-compass. The "Guilmant" model instrument I wrote about is one of these exceptional instruments.   =20   By the way, I once took this reed organ to Stone Chapel on Drury University in Springfield, Missouri, and gave a recital class demonstration. As part of that, university organist Dr. Earline Moulder and I played the first two movements of Boellmann's "Suite Gothique," using the Farrand & Votey "Guilmant" reed organ for those echo sections specified for the swell, and the 1906 Lyon & Healy 3/31 chapel pipe organ for those specified for the great. The instruments worked beautifully together in that reverberant acoustic, and the tuning was fine. The second movement ended with both organs playing together.   =20   "If someone has the Kalmus edition of Franck's L'Organiste handy, it=20   would be helpful to post the translation of the registration numbers as=20   found in the Preface. I can never remember it."   =20   There was a harmonium website that apparently no longer exists. I did however, way back in 1996, print the section under "Reinhard's Harmonium-Schule" called "about the Stops." I couldn't find it just now; the url comes up as no longer existent. I have it as a pdf if anyone wants it, but here's the basis:   =20   1. Bass stop: Diapason or Cor Anglais, Treble stops Diapason Treble or Flute. Basic 8' foundation. Notated in music as a 1 with a circle around it.   2. Bass: Bourdon, Treble: Double Diapason or Clarinette. 16' stop sounding rather full and round in the upper range-sometimes much like a clarinet, or a very round, solo flute. Notated by circled 2.   3. Bass: Clairon, Treble: Principal. 4' Pitch, notated by circled 3.   4. Bass: Bassoon, Treble: Hautbois. 8' Pitch, notated by circled 4.   5. Some include manual-only 16' Subbass stops that sound only in the lowest octave, and this stop can be brought into play when the music calls for the pedals to play a certain line, though the range isn't always right.   6. Circled E means to bring the expression stop on, which bypasses the reservoir, I think.   7. Circled GO or GJ means to bring on full organ, which was accomplished with a knee swell sometimes, and a stop othertimes.   =20   =20   Look for these notations in music that was written for "harmonium ou orgue." Notice that they don't always correspond correctly to the pipe organ specifications and this was necessary because the harmoniums didn't have as many tonal resources as most pipe organs. =20   =20   Daniel Hancock   Springfield, Missouri   =20   =20  
(back) Subject: harmonium registration From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 14:00:02 -0800   1. Bass stop: Diapason or Cor Anglais, Treble stops Diapason Treble or Flute. Basic 8=92 foundation. Notated in music as a 1 with a circle around it.   2. Bass: Bourdon, Treble: Double Diapason or Clarinette. 16=92 stop sounding rather full and round in the upper range=97sometimes much like a clarinet, or a very round, solo flute. Notated by circled 2.   3. Bass: Clairon, Treble: Principal. 4=92 Pitch, notated by circled 3.   4. Bass: Bassoon, Treble: Hautbois. 8=92 Pitch, notated by circled 4.   5. Some include manual-only 16=92 Subbass stops that sound only in the lowest octave, and this stop can be brought into play when the music calls for the pedals to play a certain line, though the range isn=92t always right.   6. Circled E means to bring the expression stop on, which bypasses the reservoir, I think.   7. Circled GO or GJ means to bring on full organ, which was accomplished with a knee swell sometimes, and a stop othertimes.       OK, it would appear that small basic 1-manual French harmoniums DIDN'T have full 16-8-4 foundations and full 16-8-4 reeds divided into bass and treble, if the nomenclature of (2) and (3) are accurate descriptions of the sound. So if you drew a typical Franck registration of (2) in the right hand and (3) in the left hand, you'd get a big fluty sound in the right hand and a reedy sound in the left hand. Presumably the balances were such that you'd hear the melody in the left hand.   Did the treble and bass have separate expression flaps like an American reed organ, or not?   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: harmonium registration From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 16:18:34 -0600   =20   OK, it would appear that small basic 1-manual French harmoniums DIDN'T=20   have full 16-8-4 foundations and full 16-8-4 reeds divided into bass and     treble, if the nomenclature of (2) and (3) are accurate descriptions of=20   the sound. So if you drew a typical Franck registration of (2) in the=20   right hand and (3) in the left hand, you'd get a big fluty sound in the=20   right hand and a reedy sound in the left hand. Presumably the balances=20   were such that you'd hear the melody in the left hand.   =20   Did the treble and bass have separate expression flaps like an American=20   reed organ, or not?   =20   Cheers,   =20   Bud   =20   I'm not sure about the harmonium having separate expression flaps. My American reed organ (Farrand & Votey, "Guilmant" 1903 1 manual) doesn't. The expression is all controlled by the right knee lever or "swell". =20   =20   What most American reed organs do have, however, are mutes on the primary (and sometimes other) sets of reeds. Draw the Dolce 8', and it opens the mute over that half set of reeds a small amount-allowing only a little air to be drawn through, and a quieter sound results. Draw the Diapason 8', and it opens the mute all the way-and you get a fuller, louder sound. These mutes are separate (for bass and treble). Needless to say, if you have the Diapason 8' drawn, and you pull the Dolce 8', nothing's going to happen, because the mutes all the way open already. =20   =20   One exception to this is occurs on my F&V. The treble Melodia and Dulciana 8' come from the same set of reeds much like the bass Diapason and Dolce 8'. Only on the treble end of this set, the Melodia opens a mute on the front side of the reed bank, and the Dulciana opens another mute on the back side of that same set. This half-set of reeds are equipped with special resonating valve and device that modifies the sound of the reeds depending on the mute opened. The Melodia is actually much more round and flutey. And the Dulciana is stringier and thinner. Both Melodia and Dulciana must be drawn to balance the Diapason. In this manner, it's like getting two stops out of one set of reeds. Not only does the Melodia add to the Dulciana, but the Dulciana adds to the Melodia, making it resemble a Diapason! I think that's pretty clever.   =20   I do seem to recall, however, that some reed organs did have separate expression flaps on the reeds. These were controlled by stops labeled something like "Bass forte" and "Treble forte" If you drew the 4' stop in the bass and played an accompaniment down the octave, and had a solo stop of 8' or 16' in the treble, it might be useful to have the "Treble forte" on to make the solo line more distinct. If one or the other was drawn, then when you opened the right swell lever, it would crescendo the other expression flap that was still down. =20   =20   For being relatively simple and humble instruments, both American reed organs and European harmoniums were surprisingly complex in nuance, and the better American reed organs could really facilitate fine music! Most pipe organists might not be too interested in specifications that only had pitches ranging from 16'-4', (reeds that spoke at 2' could only be included in the bass, because it would take a reed too small in the treble end to make that pitch) but reeds have a brilliant sound to them that makes higher pitched stops not as necessary as it is with organ pipes. If you have a chance to play a fine reed organ/harmonium, seek it out!   =20   Daniel Hancock   Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: harmonium registration From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 14:19:32 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Like my computer, I've always approached the harmonium with a certain cavalier disregard.....sort of "pump and play."   I now know that I am totally ignorant of the instrument, and I shall never play one again, even if I can find one!   Quite clearly this is a whole new (old) world, like driving steam-engines!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Liquescent <quilisma@cox.net> wrote: > > OK, it would appear that small basic 1-manual French > harmoniums DIDN'T > have full 16-8-4 foundations and full 16-8-4 reeds > divided into bass and > treble, if the nomenclature of (2) and (3) are > accurate descriptions of > the sound. So if you drew a typical Franck > registration of (2) in the > right hand and (3) in the left hand, you'd get a big > fluty sound in the > right hand and a reedy sound in the left hand.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: harmonium registration From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 14:41:34 -0800   Aside from fans like myself, you're probably right. The only real relevance it has is correctly transferring French harmonium registration to the pipe organ, and there's a lot of French harmonium music, right up to and including Tournemire and Langlais. Some of the Tournemire Postludes Libres on the Magnificat Antiphons are quite lovely, as are some of the Langlais pieces.   To start a whole 'nother byway: did German harmoniums register the same way (in reference to Karg-Elert's harmonium pieces, which I haven't been able to locate)?   Cheers,   Bud   Colin Mitchell wrote:   > Hello, > > Like my computer, I've always approached the harmonium > with a certain cavalier disregard.....sort of "pump > and play." > > I now know that I am totally ignorant of the > instrument, and I shall never play one again, even if > I can find one! > > Quite clearly this is a whole new (old) world, like > driving steam-engines! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > --- Liquescent <quilisma@cox.net> wrote: > >>OK, it would appear that small basic 1-manual French >>harmoniums DIDN'T >>have full 16-8-4 foundations and full 16-8-4 reeds >>divided into bass and >>treble, if the nomenclature of (2) and (3) are >>accurate descriptions of >>the sound. So if you drew a typical Franck >>registration of (2) in the >>right hand and (3) in the left hand, you'd get a big >>fluty sound in the >>right hand and a reedy sound in the left hand. > > > > > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. > www.yahoo.com > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >