PipeChat Digest #4891 - Wednesday, November 10, 2004
 
RE: harmonium registration
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
A tiny requiem
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: harmonium registration
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: harmonium registration
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
weird font
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: harmonium registration
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: harmonium registration
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
harmoniums
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: harmonium registration
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: harmoniums
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: harmonium registration
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: weird font
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
the horse and buggy days of computers
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: weird font
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
RE: harmonium registration
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Boston Symphony Hall Open House
  by "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net>
plain text
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: the horse and buggy days of computers
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
computer stuff
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: A tiny requiem
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: harmonium registration From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 17:01:32 -0600   Aside from fans like myself, you're probably right. The only real=20   relevance it has is correctly transferring French harmonium registration     to the pipe organ, and there's a lot of French harmonium music, right up     to and including Tournemire and Langlais. Some of the Tournemire=20   Postludes Libres on the Magnificat Antiphons are quite lovely, as are=20   some of the Langlais pieces.   =20   As much as I'd like to deny this, there's truth to it. But probably the difference isn't much greater than the difference between a turn-of-the-century tubular pneumatic organ and a modern pipe organ with digital stop and combination action. You simply get used to the mechanism to get on with the music. In all organs, whether it's a harmonium, an American reed organ, a turn of the century octopod, or a fine new pipe organ with 100 levels of memory, we make operating it second-nature. It's just a matter of being used to something different.     =20   I'm afraid that this doesn't negate that harmoniums and American reed organs are obsolete, but I feel that they are useful for authentic performance of those works composed for them. And, I like the fact that I can understand and work on my reed organ, when it needs it!   =20   To start a whole 'nother byway: did German harmoniums register the same=20   way (in reference to Karg-Elert's harmonium pieces, which I haven't been     able to locate)?   =20   Cheers,   =20   Bud   =20   In the editions (which are limited) I have seen, yes. =20   =20   Daniel Hancock   Springfield, Missouri   =20   =20  
(back) Subject: A tiny requiem From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 18:36:32 -0600   I know my life has sounded quite tragic, so I hate to impart even more bad news. This morning my cory catfish Felix (companion to the pleicostumus Oscar that died last year - yes, they were an odd couple, and no, he was not named after Felix Hell) passed away. He was at least 12 years old, a very happy and contented fish, only about 1 1/2 inches in length. He loved his daily tubifex worms, and it was such a delight to watch him cavort and play. After Oscar had died, I bought Felix his very own 5-gallon tank, which he adored. He shared it with another pleicostumus, Petrovich a/k/a Pete. They were very tidy.   We had no elaborate funeral - inasmuch as I have been so adamant against funerals, Rick held me to my view. Felix' will specified no flowers. His memorial service this morning on my way to work was the Chichester Psalms and the Reubke Sonata on the 94th Psalm. If any of you would like to remember him organically during communion next Sunday, he liked "Conga" and "Le Freak". I know Dorothy Papadakos has improvised on the latter, because I heard it on OrganLive.   He will be missed. He had a sweet disposition that I will strive for once I have beaten all the area possums to a pulp and found a new job.   Thanks for all your notes of sympathy and comfort. I love you all, and wish you wouldn't make me cry. A lawyer crying is a very ugly thing - it scares the cats.   Gotta go - the man of the house has just returned from the firing range.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com (who has just received in the mail a pair of gold OrganMasters)          
(back) Subject: Re: harmonium registration From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 20:06:57 -0500   On 11/10/04 5:18 PM, "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote:   > =20 > OK, it would appear that small basic 1-manual French harmoniums DIDN'T >=20 > have full 16-8-4 foundations and full 16-8-4 reeds divided into bass and >=20 > I=B9m totally perplexed. It looks like your post is mostly in a font the n= ame > of which I cannot recall, and VERY =B3light=B2 weight font. But not entirely= .. > Either way, I can=B9t read it. Can you use a =B3just plain normal=B2 font? >=20 > Alan >=20 > Or is it just me? >=20 > treble, if the nomenclature of (2) and (3) are accurate descriptions of >=20 > the sound. So if you drew a typical Franck registration of (2) in the >=20 > right hand and (3) in the left hand, you'd get a big fluty sound in the >=20 > right hand and a reedy sound in the left hand. Presumably the balances >=20 > were such that you'd hear the melody in the left hand. >=20 > Did the treble and bass have separate expression flaps like an American >=20 > reed organ, or not? >=20 > Cheers, >=20 > Bud >=20 > =20 >=20 > I=B9m not sure about the harmonium having separate expression flaps. My > American reed organ (Farrand & Votey, =B3Guilmant=B2 1903 1 manual) doesn=B9t. = The > expression is all controlled by the right knee lever or =B3swell=B2. >=20 > =20 >=20 > What most American reed organs do have, however, are mutes on the primary= (and > sometimes other) sets of reeds. Draw the Dolce 8=B9, and it opens the mute= over > that half set of reeds a small amount=8Ballowing only a little air to be dr= awn > through, and a quieter sound results. Draw the Diapason 8=B9, and it opens= the > mute all the way=8Band you get a fuller, louder sound. These mutes are sepa= rate > (for bass and treble). Needless to say, if you have the Diapason 8=B9 draw= n, > and you pull the Dolce 8=B9, nothing=B9s going to happen, because the mutes a= ll > the way open already. >=20 > =20 >=20 > One exception to this is occurs on my F&V. The treble Melodia and Dulcia= na 8=B9 > come from the same set of reeds much like the bass Diapason and Dolce 8=B9.= Only > on the treble end of this set, the Melodia opens a mute on the front side= of > the reed bank, and the Dulciana opens another mute on the back side of th= at > same set. This half-set of reeds are equipped with special resonating va= lve > and device that modifies the sound of the reeds depending on the mute ope= ned. > The Melodia is actually much more round and flutey. And the Dulciana is > stringier and thinner. Both Melodia and Dulciana must be drawn to balanc= e the > Diapason. In this manner, it=B9s like getting two stops out of one set of > reeds. Not only does the Melodia add to the Dulciana, but the Dulciana a= dds > to the Melodia, making it resemble a Diapason! I think that=B9s pretty cle= ver. >=20 > =20 >=20 > I do seem to recall, however, that some reed organs did have separate > expression flaps on the reeds. These were controlled by stops labeled > something like =B3Bass forte=B2 and =B3Treble forte=B2 If you drew the 4=B9 stop in= the > bass and played an accompaniment down the octave, and had a solo stop of = 8=B9 or > 16=B9 in the treble, it might be useful to have the =B3Treble forte=B2 on to ma= ke > the solo line more distinct. If one or the other was drawn, then when yo= u > opened the right swell lever, it would crescendo the other expression fla= p > that was still down. >=20 > =20 >=20 > For being relatively simple and humble instruments, both American reed or= gans > and European harmoniums were surprisingly complex in nuance, and the bett= er > American reed organs could really facilitate fine music! Most pipe organ= ists > might not be too interested in specifications that only had pitches rangi= ng > from 16=B9-4=B9, (reeds that spoke at 2=B9 could only be included in the bass, > because it would take a reed too small in the treble end to make that pit= ch) > but reeds have a brilliant sound to them that makes higher pitched stops = not > as necessary as it is with organ pipes. If you have a chance to play a f= ine > reed organ/harmonium, seek it out! >=20 > =20 >=20 > Daniel Hancock >=20 > Springfield, Missouri >=20 >=20    
(back) Subject: Re: harmonium registration From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 19:12:46 -0600   Re: harmonium registrationThis may well be a problem with your computer. = I didn't have any problem with the other posting, and your posting came out = in my computer as being 24 point font. Which is ENORMOUS.   John Speller   On 11/10/04 5:18 PM, "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote:     > I'm totally perplexed. It looks like your post is mostly in a font the name of > which I cannot recall, and VERY "light" weight font. But not entirely. Either > way, I can't read it. Can you use a "just plain normal" font?      
(back) Subject: weird font From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 17:21:47 -0800   Alan, you're on a MAC; MACs are WEIRD (chuckle); I haven't changed anything since I got online 6 years ago; don't know HOW (grin).   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Re: harmonium registration From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 20:18:58 -0500   On 11/10/04 6:01 PM, "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote:   > Aside from fans like myself, you're probably right. The only real >=20 > relevance it has is correctly transferring French harmonium registration >=20 >=20 Here we go again. Maybe it=B9s not your fault at all! I don=B9t know. But your stuff comes in SUPER LIGHT face, IBM used to call it =B3Courier.=B2 (I finally remembered the name.) Decent face. Nothing wrong with it. But =B3Times=B2 or something would be a lot better in the present application.   Alan (But PLEASE, if it is just me, somebody please SAY so!)  
(back) Subject: Re: harmonium registration From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 20:23:58 -0500   At 08:06 PM 11/10/2004, Alan Freed wrote: >On 11/10/04 5:18 PM, "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote: > > >OK, it would appear that small basic 1-manual French harmoniums DIDN'T > >have full 16-8-4 foundations and full 16-8-4 reeds divided into bass and > >I'm totally perplexed. It looks like your post is mostly in a font the >name of which I cannot recall, and VERY "light" weight font. But not >entirely. Either way, I can't read it. Can you use a "just plain = normal" >font? > >Alan > >Or is it just me?       Alan 'et al', No, it isn't just you, I have a lot of difficulty reading some of these fancy fonts, - especially the ones that are a light blue in colour.   Folks, please use an ordinary font, - it doesn't need to be as large as this one, which is the font and size chosen by Alan, but it is in the = right direction. I normally use Ariel 12, - it works fine, and is plain text.   Bob Conway  
(back) Subject: harmoniums From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 17:46:50 -0800   Someone once made the comment that French harmoniums are rather like Cavaille-Coll pipe organs ... they can sound pretty raucous up close, but in the vast reverberant spaces of a French church, they sound like a small Cavaille-Coll Orgue d'Choeur from a distance, and rather good.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: RE: harmonium registration From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 14:50:38 +1300   >So if you drew a typical Franck registration of (2) in the=20 right hand and (3) in the left hand, you'd get a big fluty sound in the=20 right hand and a reedy sound in the left hand. Presumably the balances=20 were such that you'd hear the melody in the left hand.   Don't think in terms of pipe organ sound. There's no way you'll ever get = "a big fluty sound" from a harmonium. The main ranks did indeed go from CC = to top c, though there were indeed shotr-compass stops as well.=20 =A0 >Did the treble and bass have separate expression flaps like an American =   reed organ, or not? =A0 Oh yes, and most effective as well. =A0 >For being relatively simple and humble instruments, both American reed organs and European harmoniums were surprisingly complex in nuance, and = the better American reed organs could really facilitate fine music!=A0=20   But the best American organs are nothing like as good as the French harmioniums by Mustel, Alexandre or Christophe. Some harmoniums had a = 32ft that did indeed go down to CCCC. For some years I had a 2m Mustel with = some 12 or 13 sets of reeds, and it was a fine musical instrument. If you = drew 16 & 4 and played up an octave, you got a delightful and charming 8 & 2 combination for things like 18thC chorale preludes. The sound is = altogether richer and more musical, and the touch and action far better, on = harmoniums.     >Most pipe organists might not be too interested in specifications that = only had pitches ranging from 16=92-4=92, (reeds that spoke at 2=92 could = only be included in the bass, because it would take a reed too small in the = treble end to make that pitch)   Not actually true. There are several reeds organs here in NZ by the = German firm "Straube" and they have full compass Twelfth 2 2/3 and Fifteenth = 2ft, right up to G, note 56.=20   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: harmoniums From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 14:52:11 +1300     >Someone once made the comment that French harmoniums are rather like Cavaille-Coll pipe organs ... they can sound pretty raucous up close, but in the vast reverberant spaces of a French church, they sound like a small Cavaille-Coll Orgue d'Choeur from a distance, and rather good.   You were told wrongly. I've never heard an even slightly raucous = harmonium. My big Mustel was in my home's front room, as was the Alexandre before = that one, and the first one I had which was a Christophe.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: harmonium registration From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 14:53:37 +1300     >To start a whole 'nother byway: did German harmoniums register the same way (in reference to Karg-Elert's harmonium pieces, which I haven't been able to locate)?   The Karg-Elert pieces sound good on a French harmonium. Classic English = and German Baroque also sound very effective.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: weird font From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 20:51:05 -0500   On 11/10/04 8:21 PM, "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > Alan, you're on a MAC; MACs are WEIRD (chuckle); I haven't changed anythi= ng > since I got online 6 years ago; don't know HOW (grin). >=20 > Cheers, >=20 > Bud >=20 Well, OK. So maybe it IS just me! I can take the blame for that. At the same time, I get HUNDREDS of messages per day, and have no problem reading 99.637% of them. But those (3 or 4 a week) that come in in plain ordinary Courier, come in so SUPERlight that they don=B9t leave a germ on the screen bug me (if the subject looks interesting).   (Part of it may be a visual problem, too. When I=B9m desperate, I just copy it and paste it into WORD, and read it there. That works. But it better have a very fetching subject line to make me go through THAT!)   Just in my own defense: I entered the computer world about 15-20 years ago when I was in the world of commercial architecture. In that field, and in such things as design, graphics, advertising, etc., MAC owned the field; IB= M didn=B9t know HOW to do that. Since then, Windows has moved up immensely (say, to 90%). But, having begun there, and worked there (even in graphics at ABC-TV network in the early 1990s), it=B9s =B3home=B2 for me. Yes, I=B9ve worke= d in Windoze, where the button that says =B3START=B2 means =B3shut down.=B2 That=B9s what they call =B3intuitive,=B2 right? And =B3MACs are weird=B2? Tee hee.   Thanks, Bud. A lot. No, seriously, of course. Appreciate your good words= ..   Alan    
(back) Subject: the horse and buggy days of computers From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 18:06:20 -0800   There's SUPPOSED to be a toolbar in my Netscape 7.1 to control all that, but it has vanished, never to be found again. Yeah, I know, Netscape is lousy, but I know how to work it (sorta).   *I* started with a Trash-80 slaved to a Compugraphic photo-typositor so we'd have more than a two-line memory (grin) ... before that, if the film canister jammed and the alarm didn't go off, you could type body copy for a couple of hours without knowing anything was wrong, and have to type it all over again.   Somebody actually wrote a Trash-80/Compugraphic interface (chuckle).   When that graphics house went to modern computers, they went MAC, but I was already on a decrepit Digital mainframe (!) at the Union-Tribune by then, so I never learned to use a MAC.   The church had all PCs, and they bought me my first modern computer, so I didn't have a choice, or I WOULD have gone MAC myself.   Cheers,   Bud   Alan Freed wrote:   > On 11/10/04 8:21 PM, "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote: > > > Alan, you're on a MAC; MACs are WEIRD (chuckle); I haven't changed > anything > > since I got online 6 years ago; don't know HOW (grin). > > > > Cheers, > > > > Bud > > > Well, OK. So maybe it IS just me! I can take the blame for that. At > the same time, I get HUNDREDS of messages per day, and have no problem > reading 99.637% of them. But those (3 or 4 a week) that come in in > plain ordinary Courier, come in so SUPERlight that they don=92t leave a > germ on the screen bug me (if the subject looks interesting). > > (Part of it may be a visual problem, too. When I=92m desperate, I just > copy it and paste it into WORD, and read it there. That works. But it > better have a very fetching subject line to make me go through THAT!) > > Just in my own defense: I entered the computer world about 15-20 years > ago when I was in the world of commercial architecture. In that field, > and in such things as design, graphics, advertising, etc., MAC owned the =   > field; IBM didn=92t know HOW to do that. Since then, Windows has moved = up > immensely (say, to 90%). But, having begun there, and worked there > (even in graphics at ABC-TV network in the early 1990s), it=92s = =93home=94 for > me. Yes, I=92ve worked in Windoze, where the button that says = =93START=94 > means =93shut down.=94 That=92s what they call =93intuitive,=94 right? = And =93MACs > are weird=94? Tee hee. > > Thanks, Bud. A lot. No, seriously, of course. Appreciate your good > words. > > Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: weird font From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 20:05:19 -0600   At 5:21 PM -0800 11/10/04, Liquescent wrote: >Alan, you're on a MAC; MACs are WEIRD (chuckle); I haven't changed >anything since I got online 6 years ago; don't know HOW (grin).   Being on a MAC doesn't have anything to do with this problem. The problem is, and here i go again, the use of HTML and/or Formatted text in a message. We don't have nearly the problem we used to have with HTML / Formatted text messing up the Digest version of the list since the server now can strip out all the formatting junk provided there is a PLAIN TEXT component to the email message.   BUT the HTML / Formatted text is hard to read many times, either because of the font that is used or the color that is used. I have my email program set to use "Arial" at 12 points and anything sent in Plain Text is fine but some of the Formatted emails can be a problem since the formatting overrides by settings. Most of the time this isn't a problem for me as I can easily reformat the offending email to be readable. But please be aware we have some older folks on this list who have some vision problems.and many not be a computer savvy as I am and may not be able to reformat an email as easily as I can.   I know that some email programs make it hard to send in Plain Text but there is usually a way to do so if you hunt for it. There is a page on the PipeChat web site that gives some ways of setting various email programs to Plain Text. So PLEASE, do try to send in PLAIN TEXT. Not only will the other members of the list appreciate it but also my server will appreciate it! <G> Actually the formatted emails take up much more "bandwidth" to send that ones in Plain Text and they also take up more space in people's mailboxes.   Thanks and now back to Happy PipeChatting   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: harmonium registration From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 20:15:25 -0600   The E. Harold Geer book "Organ Registration in Theory and Practice" has a whole section on The Harmonium including a complete description of the various stops on a Harmonium and how to adapt those registrations to a pipe organ.   I'm sure the book is long out of print since it was published by J. Fischer & Bro.and is copyrighted in 1957. I bet there are copies floating around in libraries for consultation.   David  
(back) Subject: Boston Symphony Hall Open House From: "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 21:07:21 -0500   What a Day! I wanted to report on the Open House last Sunday at Boston's Symphony = Hall. While there were a variety of musical activities going on around the building....in the concert hall it was All About The Organ!   My wife and I were there for the whole show, from 12:30 until about 8:30 = PM. Solo performances by Felix Hell and Thomas Trotter; three silent movies accompanied by Jeff Weiler; James David Christie and the BSO Brass section playing music for organ and brass; Mike Foley and James David Christie demonstrating what had been done to renovate the organ; an interview with James Levine, new Music Director of the BSO; The Tanglewood Festival = Chorus, directed by John Oliver and accompanied by James David Christie; and Felix Hell with the New England Conservatory Philharmonia performing Guilmant's Sympnony No. 1 for Organ and Orchestra.   What was particuarly exciting was that the hall was comfortably full most = of the day, everyone there to hear the organ. Since it was an "open house" there was a certain amount of coming-and-going, but we managed to get = seats way down front. The ushers generally kept movement in and out of the hall somewhat under control.   A great, fun day!   Phil Stimmel The Estey Pipe Organ - A Virtual Museum - www.esteyorgan.com      
(back) Subject: plain text From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 18:28:36 -0800   I've got it set to plain text; this just popped up out of cyber-nowhere (grin).   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Re: the horse and buggy days of computers From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 21:28:13 EST   In a message dated 11/10/2004 9:02:48 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@cox.net writes: Somebody actually wrote a Trash-80/Compugraphic interface (chuckle).   When that graphics house went to modern computers, they went MAC, but I was already on a decrepit Digital mainframe (!) at the Union-Tribune by then, so I never learned to use a MAC. tho this is off-topic for the list,   I believe that the fore-runner of the Mac was called the LISA (don't = remember what the acronym stood for) but the LISA was a computer front end for the Compugraphic 6400 and edtWriter series of photo-composition machines. The editwriter 7500 and 7700 (the multiple column version of the7500 with a = slightly higher thruput speed) did hve flppy disk storage (those 8 1/4 inch = floppies). Of course the MAC's big selling point was the graphical user interface, and = the several intergrated functions of the machine's Motorola CPU chip the = original 68000 that would do SOUND in addition to the other goodies written into = the user interface and operating system code. The AMC was the machine of choice = for first generation computer graphics gurus, but the DOS and windows-based operating system, being open arcitecture (vs the closed nature of MAC code = and the expensive proprietary costs associated with writing MAC software) caused = the PC te eventaully become the computer of choice in the business world.   I began computing onan Atari 128E computer (2 banks of 64 K ram) with an outboard floipy-disk unit, outboard modem (300 baud) and all the other = peripherals one could amass...It did music in a very rudimentary sort of way, but was overshadowed by other more capable machines and operating systems. = Nowadays the typical organ combination system and mulitplex relay has more computing = power than those early generation 8-bit processor-based things we called = computers.   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: computer stuff From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 18:52:18 -0800   It is germane, sorta, because I had to wait a couple of years (as I recall) for the PC version of Sibelius to come out ... they brought it out for MACs first on account of the better graphic capabilities.   Don't know about Finale ... I remember installing an early MAC version of Finale at the office (so I guess I WAS still there when they first got the MACS), thinking we could get into music engraving, but none of us could make heads or tails of it, and the manuals were the size of the Manhattan phone book.   NOW I wonder if professional COMPUTER music engraving will go the way of the photo-typositor, as people learn to do it for themselves. I seem to have a talent for learning jobs that quickly become obsolete (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: A tiny requiem From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 22:12:07 -0500   Glenda, So sorry about Felix. The loss of any pet is traumatic. I will play = something Sunday in his memory. Lee