PipeChat Digest #4893 - Thursday, November 11, 2004
 
Re: ITEMS FOR SALE
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: harmonium registration
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: harmonium registration
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: ITEMS FOR SALE
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Stoplist for Mustel Harmoniums
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
A question regarding harmoniums.
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: ITEMS FOR SALE
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
RE: harmonium registration
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
RE: harmonium registration
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
reed organs/pipe organs/digital organs
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: reed organs/pipe organs/digital organs
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
reed organs and pipe organs: contextual note
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
RE: A question regarding harmoniums.
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: harmonium registration
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: reed organs/pipe organs/digital organs
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
RE: harmonium registration
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: A question regarding harmoniums.
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: ITEMS FOR SALE From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 06:27:48 -0600   Hi! Could you tell me more about the harpsichord? I.E. a few more details, and where you are.     Blessings, Beau Surratt Director of Music and Organist First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324     -----Original Message----- From: Voicer40@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 23:08:40 -0500 Subject: ITEMS FOR SALE   > I have two things for sale someone may be interested in. > > 1. One 21-note set of Deagan Class M Chimes, which includes the 21 > tubes, striking mechanism, relay, and transformer. These chimes came > from an organ from which they played from one of the organ manuals, so > there is no keyboard. However, I have one (keyboard) which will work > that I can include. Make an offer. > > 2. One Merzdorf harpsichord, 2-manuals, 16', 8' on lower manual, and 8' > and 4' on upper manual. There is a manual coupler, and two buff stops. > The 4 stops and coupler are operated from pedals. Harpsichord is > about 9' long. $5,000. > > D. Keith Morgan > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >      
(back) Subject: Re: harmonium registration From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 21:00:45 +0800   I have played many reed organs (mostly American - Bell, Estey, etc,) which =   had a 2' stop, usually named Piccolo 2'. They are not a rarity at all. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: <littlebayus@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, November 11, 2004 4:57 PM Subject: Re: harmonium registration     --- Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote: [snip] > Most pipe organists might not be too interested in > specifications that only had pitches ranging from 16'-4', (reeds that > spoke at 2' could only be included in the bass, because it would take a > reed too small in the treble end to make that pitch)    
(back) Subject: RE: harmonium registration From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 06:02:11 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I just came across a brief list of harmonium books/arrangements and original works.....quite amazing!   I suppose there was enormous demand for such music at a certain point in history, and I assume that I have only just BEGUN to discover the repertoire.   It has been quite fascinating doing a bit of "googling" re:- harmoniums and american organs, and it would seem that the Karg-Elert works are still in print. Of course, the most obvious harmonium originals were the Lefebure-Wely works.   I still haven't come across an instrument which resembles the one I saw in the organ-builders workshop, which had the ampitheatre Cavaille-Coll style layout. I would love to know what it was, but after googling about for quite a while, I am not optimistic....perhaps it was a one-off. I DO recall that it had a 32ft pedal stop. The trouble is, the machine was slightly buried under a pile of wooden pipes, and there was no chance of ever playing it or hearing it.   S. Karg-Elert: Funerale 5 Monologe opus 33 Passacaglia opus 25 Sonatinen opus 14, No. 2 Sonatinen opus 14, No. 3 5 Aquarelle opus 27 Partita in 8 S=E4tzen opus 37 Phantasie und Fuge D-Dur 7 Idyllen opus 104   Bach: Komm, s=FC=DFer Tod   Mozart: Adagio   Leclair: Largo   Corelli: Largo   Brahms: St=FCcke   Wagner: Auserlesene St=FCcke Bd. 1   Album: Bunte Bl=E4tter     A. Reinhard: Sammlung auserlesener St=FCcke+   =DCbungs- und Vortragsst=FCcke+   Wagner: Charfreitagszau   Bach: Siciliano+   Harmoniumschule   Wagner: Gebet der Elisabeth+   Brahms: Wiegenlied+   Pressel: An der Weser+   Wagner: Meisters=E4nger+   Polyhymnia opus 40     Eduard Biehl: Vier Elegien opus 47   Bach: Air celebre Rudolf Bibl: Sammlung von Tonst=FCcken   Wagner: Tristan und Isolde opus 49     L. Boellmann: Heures mytiques     J. Bonset Harmoniumbuch   Harmoniumkl=E4nge Bd. IV     H. Bungart Harmoniumschule     Amerikanisch: Church voluntarys Bd. 1+2     H. Claus: Wagner: Lohengrin Vorspiel+     C. A. Collin: Esquisses     J. Cumellas Rib=F3: Seis piezas faciles     J. B. Duroc: Unterhaltungen op 11     A. Dvorak: Bagatellen opus 47     Fr. Eckhart: Harmoniumschule     T. de Elduayen: Preludios, Boileau No 29,30,32     C. Franck: L=B4organiste     R. Gerretson: Die Schlacht bei Waterloo+Chor   Harmoniumalbum V     Ch. Gounod: Petite Messe solenelle     A. Guilmant: Harmoniumalbum   L=B4organiste pratique     P. Hassenstein: Wagner: Tristan und Isolde+   Album   Schule f=FCr Hausorgel     K. K=E4mpf: Modernes Normalharmoniumalbum     A. Kranz: Unser Leben im Lied     J. B. Lambert: Coleccion de marchas religiosas     L.J.A. Lefebure W.: La Sainte Chapelle   Bolero de concert     W. Lenz: Haydn: Largo+   Mozart: Andante+   J. L=F6w: Harmoniumalbum, Heft 7     J. May: Wagner: Albumblatt     V. Miko: Wagner: Pilgerchor+     J.M. Padr=F3: Siete piezas     E. Parlow: Vortragsst=FCcke opus 138     W. Popp: Kreutzer: Sch=E4fers Sonntagslied+     H. Protze: Aeolus Lehrgang opus 22     A. Ringer: Musik f=FCr Feste und Feiern     R. Schartel: Schwanengesang f=FCr Kunstharmonium     E. Stapf: Harmoniumschule     J.B. Schiedermayer: Jubilate     J.G. Stehle: Schule f=FCr Mannborgharmonium     E. Torres: Cantos intimos     P. Wachs: L=B4orgue au Salon     J. Wanaus: Fantasie f-moll opus 22     H. Wenzel: Harmoniumschule   Praeludien-Album   Wagners Opernschatz   Im Opernhaus   In characteristically thorough Dutch style, there is quite a comprehensive database of harmoniums on the following URL:-       http://www.harmoniumvereniging.nl/   Also, an absolutely delightful site, on which can be heard some splendid music written for harmonium, both solo and in combination. The Widor Canzona is really very beautiful, whilst the Guilmant Scherzo Op.31 is absolutely stunning and wonderfully played. Don't miss the Lefebure-Wely "Tarantella"....just delightful. As for the Lemmens "Walspurgisnacht".....talk about spooky music!!   This is really very high quality music, and something of a revelation after years of hearing old ladies pump away at hymns!       http://www.musica-stnazaire.com/dossiers/harmuniu.htm     Enjoy!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: ITEMS FOR SALE From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 09:00:06 -0800   >I have two things for sale someone may be interested in. > >1. One 21-note set of Deagan Class M Chimes, which includes the 21 >tubes, striking mechanism, relay, and transformer. These chimes >came from an organ from which they played from one of the organ >manuals, so there is no keyboard. However, I have one (keyboard) >which will work that I can include. Make an offer. > >2. One Merzdorf harpsichord, 2-manuals, 16', 8' on lower manual, and >8' and 4' on upper manual. There is a manual coupler, and two buff >stops. The 4 stops and coupler are operated from pedals. >Harpsichord is about 9' long. $5,000. > >D. Keith Morgan   Once again....PLEASE if any one's advertises items available put a location! While we are a friendly bunch I dont think we have progressed to where we have everyone's location memorized ?     Thanks!   John V  
(back) Subject: Stoplist for Mustel Harmoniums From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 08:11:59 -0600   Greetings:   This is the basic stoplist for Mustels.   There are some differences depending on the year manufactured. Our Mustel also has a player unit which adds a number of extra drawknobs on both the bass and treble sides.   Also, the Mustel had a stop called "Prolongment" which effected notes 1 - 13. When drawn, the player could depress a key which would remain down until another key in the bottom octave was played, or the key was released by a movement of the knee or disengaging the stop. (this is similar to = the "Pedal Point" stop on the Mason & Hamlin Liszt organs).   (note the 2" celeste in the bass, the 16' celeste and 32' baryton in the treble)   Best to all,   Tom Gregory   Stop 1 Forte Expressif Stop 2 Harpe Eolienne 2 Stop 3 Basson 8 Stop 4 Clairon 4 Stop 5 Bourdon 16 Stop 6 Cor Anglais 8 Stop 7 Perc on Cor Anglais 8 Stop 8 Grand Jeu Stop 9 Expression Stop 10 Perc on Flute 8 Stop 11 FLute 8 Stop 12 Clarinette 16 Stop 13 Fifre 4 Stop 14 Hautbois 8 Stop 15 Musette 16 Stop 16 Voix Celestes Stop 17 Baryton 32 Stop 18 Forte Expressif  
(back) Subject: A question regarding harmoniums. From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 09:42:24 -0500   At 09:02 AM 11/11/2004, Colin wrote: >I just came across a brief list of harmonium >books/arrangements and original works.....quite >amazing!   Colin 'et al', Thanks for the clips. This really piques my interest!   But it also brings to mind another question.   Why do we have the eternal warring factions of pipe organs versus electronic organs? These harmonium clips are every bit as far removed = from pipe organs as electronic organs are, - yet they are acceptable to the = pipe organ aficionados! Just my immediate thoughts!   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: ITEMS FOR SALE From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 08:42:24 -0600   Hello, John, et al: Keith Morgan listed: > ITEMS FOR SALE     > I have two things for sale someone may be interested in. > > 1. One 21-note set of Deagan Class M Chimes. . . >2. One Merzdorf harpsichord, 2-manuals . . . Keith Morgan lives in Denton, Texas. F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: RE: harmonium registration From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 09:12:33 -0600     I thought perhaps that remark would draw some comment and contention! I do remember reading that 2' stops in the treble end of the manual required reeds that were simply too small. I wonder, then, if for those reed organs with stop knobs labeled 2' for the treble end: Do they break back at the top octave, like a Larigot, or Sifflote on a pipe organ?   I know from experience that the top reeds for a 4' stop are terribly small, and IF what I read about the inability of creating a reed to run through 5 octaves at 2' pitch is true, then perhaps there were break-backs. Too, it could be that those 2' stops existed on reed organs with different manual compasses, like most American reed organs.     Those fine reed organs with five octave CCC compasses and nicely voiced stops appear not to have 2' stops in the treble, you can see many nice examples at the website of the Reed Organ Society: http://www.reedsoc.org/organs/Default.htm   2' stops in the bass octaves of American reed organs are not a rarity. In the treble, they are.   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri       I have played many reed organs (mostly American - Bell, Estey, etc,) which=20 had a 2' stop, usually named Piccolo 2'. They are not a rarity at all. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message -----=20 From: <littlebayus@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, November 11, 2004 4:57 PM Subject: Re: harmonium registration     --- Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote: [snip] > Most pipe organists might not be too interested in > specifications that only had pitches ranging from 16'-4', (reeds that > spoke at 2' could only be included in the bass, because it would take a > reed too small in the treble end to make that pitch)=20  
(back) Subject: RE: harmonium registration From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 09:19:13 -0600     >Don't think in terms of pipe organ sound. There's no way you'll ever get= "a big fluty sound" from a harmonium. The main ranks did indeed go from CC t= o top c, though there were indeed shotr-compass stops as well.=20   Perhaps not, from a harmonium, but I've known it to be so, from certain A= merican reed organs. =A0 >But the best American organs are nothing like as good as the French harmioniums by Mustel, Alexandre or Christophe. Some harmoniums had a 32f= t that did indeed go down to CCCC. For some years I had a 2m Mustel with so= me 12 or 13 sets of reeds, and it was a fine musical instrument. If you drew= 16 & 4 and played up an octave, you got a delightful and charming 8 & 2 combination for things like 18thC chorale preludes. The sound is altogeth= er richer and more musical, and the touch and action far better, on harmoniu= ms.   The finest American reed organs do come close, however! Some of those in= struments had three manuals and pedal, and included 32' stops, also. Not= as common here in the states as harmoniums of that caliber in Europe, th= ough. On my reed organ, you can draw the 16' Bourdon and 4' Flute and ge= t that charming sound, perfect for baroque. I really do think that the s= ound of the best American reed organs (of which there appear to be precio= us few!) is just as rich and musical, and perhaps it is the action and to= uch that lack. They do seem to be rather sluggish, by comparison.   >Not actually true. There are several reeds organs here in NZ by the Germ= an firm "Straube" and they have full compass Twelfth 2 2/3 and Fifteenth 2f= t, right up to G, note 56.=20   That still doesn't go up to note 61, and those reeds are terribly small! = They often break, especially if they've been stored in places with high = humidity--just a small amount of corrosion can cause them to weaken enoug= h to break.   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: reed organs/pipe organs/digital organs From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 09:29:49 -0600     >Why do we have the eternal warring factions of pipe organs versus=20 electronic organs? These harmonium clips are every bit as far removed from=20 pipe organs as electronic organs are, - yet they are acceptable to the pipe=20 organ aficionados! Just my immediate thoughts!   >Bob Conway     Reed organs and harmoniums are different from pipe organs, as are digital/electronic organs. But, in my estimation, reed organs and harmoniums have a few more things in their favor:   1. Mechanical action--makes for very intimate contact with the reed pallets. And I'm not condemning electro-pneumatic and direct-electric actions, which I love!   2. Reeds produce a "real" sound. The vibrating tongue actually moves the air and produces a naturally generated sound. =20   3. They come in "sets," sort of like ranks. By necessity (in most cases being placed directly under or in line with the keys) they are arranged in order of pitch, starting with the lowest and ending with the highest.=20   4. There is a reed, or a pipe, for each note on the manual for every stop. That many tone generators makes for a rich sound.   These are just a few immediate thoughts, provoked by Bob's statement!   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: reed organs/pipe organs/digital organs From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 10:07:08 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, November 11, 2004 9:29 AM Subject: reed organs/pipe organs/digital organs       >Why do we have the eternal warring factions of pipe organs versus electronic organs? These harmonium clips are every bit as far removed from pipe organs as electronic organs are, - yet they are acceptable to the pipe organ aficionados! Just my immediate thoughts!   >Bob Conway     >Reed organs and harmoniums are different from pipe organs, as are digital/electronic organs. But, in my estimation, reed organs and harmoniums have a few more things in their favor:   1. Mechanical action--makes for very intimate contact with the reed pallets. And I'm not condemning electro-pneumatic and direct-electric actions, which I love!   2. Reeds produce a "real" sound. The vibrating tongue actually moves the air and produces a naturally generated sound.   3. They come in "sets," sort of like ranks. By necessity (in most cases being placed directly under or in line with the keys) they are arranged in order of pitch, starting with the lowest and ending with the highest.   4. There is a reed, or a pipe, for each note on the manual for every stop. That many tone generators makes for a rich sound.   >These are just a few immediate thoughts, provoked by Bob's statement!   To these I would add that, being a wind instrument, the reed organ has an expressive quality that is lacking in electronic instruments. It is, indeed, more expressive than some pipe organs. This is particularly true = of the French harmonium (rather than the American organ), where how hard or gently you pump makes a much bigger difference to the sound.   By the way, does everyone know that there is a Reed Organ Society for = those interested in the instrument? It has a website at www.reedsoc.org   John Speller      
(back) Subject: reed organs and pipe organs: contextual note From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 11:30:24 EST   Dear Chatters" There was a body of late nineteenth and early twentieth century literature that was intended to be played upon either a pipe organ OR a = harmonium. Collections of works by Vierne and other less known composers of his = school specifically state that they can be played upon either instrument, with = the knowledge that the effect would be different. Since the builders of harmonia were very much aware that their instruments and pipe organs were entirely different beasts, no claims of = equivalency were made. This distinction seems to have been acceptable, and there were no altercations regarding whether or not they were "indistinguishable" or = "just the same." The music, therefore, was conceived with the possibility in mind = that either sonority, and either speed of key response, would be called upon. = The phrasing and tempi were likely geared toward that provision.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ..  
(back) Subject: RE: A question regarding harmoniums. From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 05:47:20 +1300     >Why do we have the eternal warring factions of pipe organs versus electronic organs? These harmonium clips are every bit as far removed = from pipe organs as electronic organs are, - yet they are acceptable to the = pipe organ aficionados!   Reed organs of any kind don't compete with the (pipe) organ and don't = claim to, that's one reason. The other reason, I think is that reed organs are genuine wind instruments, while the electroid never is.   2c worth.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: harmonium registration From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 05:50:51 +1300   >That still doesn't go up to note 61, and those reeds are terribly small! They often break, especially if they've been stored in places with high humidity--just a small amount of corrosion can cause them to weaken enough to break.   On the Straube instruments I was referring to, the top few octaves (forgotten how many) have the reeds of stainless steel, so they don't corrode or break. 40 to 50 years old, these instruments are still in tune and without any dumb notes. Some of them have electronic pedal units with = a 30-note pedalboard, would you believe! None of the tone, though, is = anywhere near as good as Musetl/Alexandre/Christophe.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: reed organs/pipe organs/digital organs From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 11:48:49 -0500   I'm a total pipe organ nut and electronic organs do not interest me in the =   least, at least never before but as we've discussed before I'm starting to =   get intrigued with hammonds. But nevertheless this post has so many holes = I can't resist ripping it apart (in a friendly way). :)   On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 09:29:49 -0600, Daniel Hancock wrote > >Why do we have the eternal warring factions of pipe organs versus > electronic organs? These harmonium clips are every bit as far > removed from pipe organs as electronic organs are, - yet they are > acceptable to the pipe organ aficionados! Just my immediate thoughts! > > >Bob Conway > > Reed organs and harmoniums are different from pipe organs, as are > digital/electronic organs. But, in my estimation, reed organs and > harmoniums have a few more things in their favor: > > 1. Mechanical action--makes for very intimate contact with the reed > pallets. And I'm not condemning electro-pneumatic and direct- > electric actions, which I love! Perhaps so, but DE and EP pipe organs have no more key expression than electronic organs. > > 2. Reeds produce a "real" sound. The vibrating tongue actually > moves the air and produces a naturally generated sound. Hmmm... just = like a speaker cone. > > 3. They come in "sets," sort of like ranks. By necessity (in most > cases being placed directly under or in line with the keys) they are > arranged in order of pitch, starting with the lowest and ending with > the highest. This has to do with what? > > 4. There is a reed, or a pipe, for each note on the manual for every > stop. That many tone generators makes for a rich sound. So how rich a sound is permissible before the instrument is worthy of discussion? > All of the above claims are great evidence in a case trying to prove that winded organs are "better". As far as proving that electronic organs do = not count as viable instruments, they do the opposite. You have supported the =   other side!   I was on jury duty the other day so my mind is in legal mode LOL   Andy     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: RE: harmonium registration From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 05:54:46 +1300   A friend of mine in Orwell, Cambridgeshire, England, has one of the ten = reed organs that Wm Hill (of Syndey Town Hall organ fame) made, so it's very = rare and precious.   And a friend here in NZ has a 3m reed organ of some approx.20 sets of = reeds, so it's huge. Dimensions of the instrument - about 7ft 6in. high, 10ft = wide and about 3ft through to the back.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: A question regarding harmoniums. From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 08:50:30 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Simple answer to this Bob!   What electronic manufacturer could claim to have included in their staff the names of Cavaille-Coll and Fr.Willis?   Actually, the harmonium grew out of the idea of organ "free-reeds," and many German Romantic instruments virtually had a "harmonium division" in a box enclosure, so it isn't far removed from the organ at all.   I seem to recall that Abbe Vogler used to drag a large portable organ around with him, which included free-reeds; then very much in vogue....anyone recall the details?   The modern electronic is not, of course, an acoustic instrument at all, no matter how splendid the best of them may sound. In that respect, they are as alien to "real" instruments as a synthesiser is, but musically, they can be quite magnificent when a real pipe organ is beyond immediate financial reach.   I came across something very interesting, whilst on the subject of harmoniums v pipes v digital.   How many people know that Yamaha made harmoniums, way back in time?   So why can't they make digital motor-bikes?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Bob Conway <conwayb@sympatico.ca> wrote:   > > Colin 'et al', > Thanks for the clips. This really piques my > interest! > > But it also brings to mind another question. > > Why do we have the eternal warring factions of pipe > organs versus > electronic organs? These harmonium clips are every > bit as far removed from > pipe organs as electronic organs are, - yet they are > acceptable to the pipe > organ aficionados!       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com