PipeChat Digest #4906 - Monday, November 15, 2004
 
Hogwash (was "actions and pipe speech")  LONG!
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
Re: this weekend's music
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Caleb Simper p.s.
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Mr. Roberts' post
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Caleb Simper p.s.
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Actions and pipe speech onset
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Hogwash (was "actions and pipe speech")  LONG!
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Concerted music style of playing
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Caleb Simper   ....     Flies Again !!!!
  by "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com>
Re: Caleb Simper p.s.
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: tracker, electric, etc
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Re: Actions and pipe speech onset
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
RE: Concerted music style of playing
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Actions and pipe speech onset
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Today's Music
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: Hogwash (was "actions and pipe speech") LONG! From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 16:13:26 -0800 (PST)   Dear List, Perhaps someone has already written about the matters which I will discuss = below. I get my postings from the various lists in a digest form, and = therefore do not read them until they appear. It is one of my pet peeves that some organists and organ builders have a = penchant for repeating hearsay about particular instruments, and = misrepresenting that hearsay as established fact, when they have neither = seen, heard, played, nor examined the instruments in question for = themselves. More often than not, the person from whom they heard these = apocryphal tales in the first place has not visited the instruments, = either. If one has real, first hand experience with historic organs, one = can immediately recognize such misinformation as being straight from "Ye = Olde Spuriosity Shoppe". Myth #1 concerns the matter of acoustics in buildings in North Germany. = Bob Elms mentioned the live acoustics of these churches in one of his many = postings. While a few of the large Schnitger organs are located in big = stone churches with live acoustics, some of the small Schnitgers are = installed in smallish wooden churches or at least in churches that have = interiors of wood. They aren't particularly reverberant. Wood buildings = usually aren't, though they have a certain amount of resonance and warmth. =   Myth #2 concerns the matter of light actions. During the tracker revival = it became fashionable to build organs with teensy pallets, making for wind = starved, consumptive pipe speech and tone. That style of organ building = was touted as "Baroque", when in fact it was nothing of the sort. = Organists in the 60's and 70's were convinced that "responsive mechanical = actions" (read "extremely light mechanical actions") were normative on = Baroque organs, never mind what was really the case. Well, organ builders = out there, pray tell: how does one make teensy pallets and light tracker = action with a HW disposition such as: 16,16,8,8,8,5 1/3,4,4,2 2/3,2, = II,IV-X,16,8,8,4???? That's what's on the HW at Haarlem St. Bavo. I hate = to break it to people who have never played these organs, but the actions = (especially the HW) on many of these instruments are quite stiff. I = can't see how it could be otherwise with that many big stops on one = manual. So the person who said that old Dutch organs often have heavy actions was absolutely right. Myth #3 concerns the matter of windpressures, which is related to Myth #2. = Neobaroque organs often have very low windpressures, as did some small, = very early Baroque organs, especially Italian instruments. Once again, = that Neo-baroque practice was based in part on bad or partial information, = false assumptions, and the kind of hearsay that seems to be in abundance, = this list not excepted. Historic builders were working on the basis of = reality and practical experience, not ideology. Organ builders: please = tell us if it is practical to have a windpressure of below 70 mm for the = HW spec that I listed above? I don't think it is. The St. Bavo organ has = a windpressure of about 75mm, and other Dutch organs from the same period = (first half of the 18th. century) have pressures as high as 85mm. French = classical organs sometimes have even higher pressures (over 100 mm in a = few cases) which is exactly what one would expect in organs in huge = buildings---most French churches ARE immense, in contrast with village churches in North Germany-- with lots of big = foundations, and powerful reeds with blazing tone. Organ builders, tell = us: what do higher pressures do for key resistance in mechanical actions? = If I'm not mistaken, higher pressures make the touch heavier. The laws of = physics apply to organs, just as they do to all other objects on this = earth. So this myth goes out the window, too. In response to the person who wrote about heavy actions on old Dutch = organs, another of our more frequent posters wrote, "Um, I'd question the = restoration methods used (if any)..." Now tell us: how many of these = organs have you actually seen, heard, played, or examined closely? The = organs in Dutch churches are often owned by the municipal authorities in = the towns in which they are located, and always have been. Many churches = with historic organs are now closed and are museums owned by the state. = The organs are protected historic national treasures, and huge sums of = money have been spent on their upkeep and preservation. For the past 40 = years old Dutch organs have been given very high quality restorations by = distinguished firms such as Flentrop, and have been lovingly restored and = cared for by some of the most talented organ builders in the world, such = as Juergen Ahrend and the Edskes family, to mention only two well known = names. So you would "question the restoration methods used (if any)", would you? What qualifies you to make such a critical = pronouncement? How many old Dutch organs have you personally restored? = I'll bet dollars to Dutch pancakes that the answer is zero. In any case, = one doesn't have to be named Flentrop, Von Beckerath, Ahrend, or Eule to = know that big pallets and hefty wind pressures make for heavy touch; it = isn't any incompetence or lack of expertise on the part of restorers that = makes them so. The same person went on to weave the following yarn: "There is a famous = Cliquot (?) [sic] from the 18th century with an especially remarkable = original (light) touch [which organ? where?], and they're [who are = "they"?] TERRIFIED to do anything radical to it, for fear of changing it." = This is just the very kind of hearsay that I mentioned at the beginning of = this posting. First of all, the family name of the great French classical = builders is spelled "Clicquot". The person posting this story apparently = wasn't sure whether or not it was indeed a Clicquot, and didn't tell us = which Clicquot, but we're supposed to take this unsubstantiated hearsay as = supporting evidence for his premise. Anyone who knows anything about French Classical organs knows that a = characteristic of these instruments is suspended action. Dutch organs do = not as a general rule have suspended action. Suspended action depends on = hanging weight to lighten the touch. There is enough hanging weight to = overcome the heaviness of the pallets and inertia, so that a small amount = of pressure on the key opens the pallet. French Classical organs have a = comparatively light touch as a result. The thing that few people realize = is that as in most things in this world, this is a trade off: one pays for = the lightness of touch with a rather sluggish repetition. That's why one = doesn't generally find rapid repeated notes in French classical music, but = they are a characteristic of North German fugue subjects, for example. = This difference in action accounts in some measure for the fact that = French classical organs usually have lighter actions than do Dutch organs = of a similar size. And as far as "they" being "TERRIFIED to do anything radical to it", any = "terror" probably results from the scruples of the restorers and the = oversight of monuments commissions in European countries. Nothing can be = done to old organs there without the blessing of the state authorities who = are responsible for such matters. The people who restore old organs in = Europe are highly skilled; they also have seen first hand what kind of = damage can be done to old instruments, even by well intentioned, highly = qualified craftsmen. That knowledge generally makes present day restorers = of old organs very conservative, scrupulous, and careful. I am determined that my own students will not parrot this kind of second = hand misinformation and hearsay. That is precisely why I have developed a = plan to take my students to Europe every year to play organs from the late = medieval period to the present. We're going to Holland and North Germany = in January to play the organs at Alkmaar, Haarlem, Leiden, Amsterdam/Oude = Kerk, Hamburg/St. Jakobi, and Stade. In 2003 we went to France, where the = students played the fabled Cavaille-Coll at St-Sulpice, the Couperin organ = at St-Gervais, the wonderful Clicquot at Houdan, and several other = fantastic instruments. In future years we'll go to other places in = Europe, so that in the four years of their undergraduate education, the = students will become acquainted with the most important schools of organ = building, and have lessons on those organs with the best organists and = teachers in Europe. I also think that it's no less important for students = to play a wide variety of kinds of organs from all periods on this side of the Atlantic as well. First hand experience with = organs of all types will give students an ideal in their imaginations to = emulate whenever they're playing that same music on other, dissimilar = instruments. In my opinion, music really happens in the imagination: = when making music, a performer is simply trying to recreate that ideal = music that he or she hears in his or her mind. Hearing sounds similar to = what various composers heard and knew, and dealing with the practical = realities of playing old organs is the main benefit of these tours, but = there is another purpose as well: students will be able to recognize = hogwash, and to smell bovine excrement when they get wind of it. And = there is plenty of both about, it seems. Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury, CT USA  
(back) Subject: Re: this weekend's music From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 19:53:41 EST   On 11/14/04 4:01 PM, "_RMB10@aol.com_ (mailto:RMB10@aol.com) " <_RMB10@aol.com_ (mailto:RMB10@aol.com) > wrote: >> This Thursday-Saturday was our Third Annual Church Music Summit at >> Friendship Missionary Baptist Church, Charlotte, NC. >Monty: I am simply in awe! I can't imagine ANY church, of any >denomination, pulling off something better than that, anywhere! >Get a couple days' sleep. And know that THIS Lutheran is VERY = impressed. >Alan, having enjoyed a fabulous repot! Alan-- This year, the Summit was sponsored in part by a grant from the Calvin College Institute for Worship. We had two of their board members in = attendance to make sure we were using their money properly--they told me that they were =   very impressed with what we had done and how we were trying to raise the standards of excellence in church music among smaller churches--giving = them exposure to national figures and an opportunity to work with them one on = one. Next year, Andre Thomas and Rodney Eichenberger are the chief clinicians. = We can't wait--although all of us are exhausted from this weekend! Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Caleb Simper p.s. From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 08:55:23 +0800   Bud I think the "valleys stand so thick with corn that they dance and = sing" came from one of Simper's Harvest anthems. The picture of a field of wheat =   dancing and singing is too much for my fertile imagination. My choir used = to sing it yearly 50 years ago but I have not heard it for many years now. There was also another anthem that qualified as a bit of Victoriana which started with gusto "Praise the Lord O Jerusalem." Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, November 14, 2004 10:37 PM Subject: Caleb Simper p.s.     > And thank you, Bob! The congregation loved them; the choir thought they > were hilarous, and definitely sang them tongue-in-cheek with appropriate =   > Victorian gestures (thank the good LORD we were in the BACK) (chuckle). > > We never got round to the Barnby "O Give Thanks" (is it? the one with = the > hee hees and ho hos in the bass part when the valleys or whoever laugh = and > sing) ... I shudder to think what my basses would have done with THAT > (grin). >    
(back) Subject: Mr. Roberts' post From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 17:21:06 -0800   Thank you for your informative post.   I apologize that at my advanced age and after suffering two strokes, I don't always hit the right keys on the computer; that's also why I had to stop playing the organ.   "Clicquot" is not in my spell-checker.   I also apologize for no longer having access to my library, which I sold off or gave away when I retired, lacking the energy to pack and move it. I have to rely on a fading memory, for which I beg your indulgence.   As to the substance of the story about the Clicquot, it was told to me by Fenner Douglass. I was his student at Oberlin during the time he was writing "The Language of the Classical French Organ: A Musical Tradition Before 1800" ... most of the material was presented to us in lecture form in Organ Class.   Cordially,   Bud Clark, who at his advanced age is spared the ravages of chronic PMS .... I wish you a speedy and complete recovery, Mr. Roberts.      
(back) Subject: Re: Caleb Simper p.s. From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 17:23:44 -0800       bobelms wrote:   > Bud I think the "valleys stand so thick with corn that they dance and > sing" came from one of Simper's Harvest anthems. The picture of a field > of wheat dancing and singing is too much for my fertile imagination. My > choir used to sing it yearly 50 years ago but I have not heard it for > many years now. There was also another anthem that qualified as a bit of =   > Victoriana which started with gusto "Praise the Lord O Jerusalem." > Bob Elms. >   You're right. It's the Barnby "Praise the Lord, O Jerusalem" that has the basses hee-hawing under the tune (chuckle), I THINK (lest I be accused yet again of perpetuating misinformation).   You sent me copies of both anthems, for which I thank you again. We had great fun with them.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Actions and pipe speech onset From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 17:26:58 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I am in awe of the ingenuity Richard demonstrates!   I recall, as a tiny-boned 15 year old, having to crawl into an organ with similar problems. It was so cramped, it would have qualified as a Grade 6 pot-hole!   Guess who went inside to mend pouches and torn leathers on motors?   Most of the space was taken up by half the world's lead supply in the form of pneumatic tubing. The building frame was massive, as was everything else, and underneath the 16ft pedal chest was the ONLY way into the bowels of the beast......about a 7" gap.   I dreaded going there. The organ was full of dust and decades of industrial grime, and the "work experience" was, shall we say, Dickensian. I would emerge, and the only features visible would be my teeth and eyes!   It was built by a cowboy, it sounded like a mule and it played like a typewriter.   People just do not realise what organ-builders have to contend with sometimes.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   PS: The walkway between Great and Swell was so small, the only way to tune the Swell was to remove some of the shutters, carefully lay them on the walkway after leaning them precariously against the Great Trumpet (the only way!). Then, I would STAND on the swell shutters in the 9" space between the two divisions!!!!!         --- Richard Schneider <arpschneider@starband.net> wrote:   > > A number of years ago, we re-built a 1905 Hinners > tracker organ that was a > VERY strange animal, in terms of its internal > layout, in that the mechanism > was juxtaposed 90=B0 in the case from what the facade > would normally dictate. > > Consequently, the speaking bass pipes for several > Prestant ranks on the > facade were removed from the Main Windchest by MILES > and were conductored to > them.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Hogwash (was "actions and pipe speech") LONG! From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 17:51:42 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   What a fine posting from Stephen Roberts, which "struck a chord" with my own experiences.   One or two tiny additions to the information he supplies are in order.   Firstly, I think I mentioned playing an old Dutch organ in a wooden church at Leiden. Bold tone, but not excessively bright. The church had a lovely ambience rather than a huge reverberation, and whatever happens in wooden churches, it seems to take the edge off the sound in a most pleasing way.   Secondly, I wonder if Stephen has played the organ of St.Bavo?   Straight away, let me confess that I don't actually know if the action was "restored" as original....by which I mean original Muller rather than anything which happened in the 19th century. I suspect that the action is entirely new, by Marcussen. I can tell Stephen, if he hasn't played the beast, that the action is absolutely wonderful....neither too light nor too heavy. It is one of the best actions I have set fingers upon, and gazing upwards, the thought occured that some of the action runs must be 40ft long!   The wind pressure at Haarlem was reduced by Marcussen, in the mistaken belief that it had been greatly increased in subsequent re-builds. They also rubbed out the nicking!!   Some old organs in Holland are very, very heavy to play, and couplers are usually out of the question in fast passages....but who needs them with such complete choruses? I think the worst Dutch organ action I ever came across was on an organ built by Schmidt, before he trotted off the England.   I think Stephen and I would absolutely agree on the thoroughness (and cost) of Dutch restoration work, which is a whole industry backed by extremely professional organ-historians who act as government advisors. Jurgen Ahrend stands alone at the top of the pile, but many other restorer such as Flentrop, have done marvellous work, with an attention to detail which wouldn't disgrace brain-surgery.   As for Stephen's comments about French Classical organs, I feel that I have learned something important which I didn't know previously; especially the bit about suspended actions and repeated notes.   Fascinating stuff indeed....thank you Stephen.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK             __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Concerted music style of playing From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 18:00:39 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Ever since listening to the excellent performances of Bach played by Tim Grenz on "Organs&Organists online," I have been wondering why it is that Tim, and others, play the whole of a Bach Prelude or Fugue on the same manual and on the same registration throughout.   When I go to Holland and play the old organs, I am impressed by the absolute completeness of each manual and the total independence of the pedal organs in instruments of any size.   As a provocative "opener," I wonder why they bothered having contrasted choruses if they were not used in the great works.   Is it me?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Caleb Simper .... Flies Again !!!! From: "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 18:44:53 -0800 (PST)     Hi Everyone,   After hearing a MIDI of "King Of Kings" by CS I decided I would journey = back into time and just ordered all 12 volumes of his organ Voluntaries. = I even opted for Air shipping. I figured it is just what I need to play in = order to retreat into the "goode olde days" after reading the paper each = day.   Matt         --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Re: Caleb Simper p.s. From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 21:16:39 -0600   Actually it comes from Ps. 65: 14, so perhaps King David should get the credit. Then there is also the hymn "To thee, O Lord, our hearts we = raise" (A&MR No. 484), the last two lines of the first stanza of which read, "The valleys stand so thick with corn / That even they are singing." I dare = say Caleb Simper had something about it too. Fields that are thick with corn = do actually sing and dance in the wind.   John Speller.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, November 14, 2004 6:55 PM Subject: Re: Caleb Simper p.s.     > Bud I think the "valleys stand so thick with corn that they dance and sing" > came from one of Simper's Harvest anthems. The picture of a field of = wheat > dancing and singing is too much for my fertile imagination.      
(back) Subject: Re: tracker, electric, etc From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 21:42:33 -0600   I think that the instruments are not to blame as much as the performers. = If we are talking about destroying this field, I think most performers are to =   blame. I have been to numerous concert in the past couple of months, and = if they were student recitals, I doubt they would have passed. I don't see = too many concert pianists or other instrumentalists with unprepared and down right sloppy playing. Why is it that most players in the organ field can get away with this?   Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St. Champaign, IL 61820 217.390.0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Actions and pipe speech onset From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 22:15:11 -0600   Daniel Stipe, senior organ student at the University of North Texas played our organ in St. Vincent's Cathedral, Bedford, TX, tonight. The program was overall beautifully played, but his very gentle touch on the Lento of the Bach Trio Sonata BWV 530 was beautifully evident from the nave of the church. This is what makes the building of tracker action organs = rewarding. Another such experience was when Joan Lippincot played our organ at = Trinity Episcopal in New Orleans. Folks, it is not the speed of the pallet descent, but the abruptness or smoothness of its initial opening. After the approximately 1/2 mm of opening it is all over. This is why the effect is so difficult to get with any kind of servo action. To have this kind of response, the action must have minimal pluck, balanced with the spring tension which returns the pallet. Pallet size, wind pressure, leverages, and key fall all have to work together to produce an action which responds to touch. An excellent article is ISO information is recommended for further reading I am not = sure of the year, or page, but if you can get to a collection of back issues, I am sure it can be found. Roy Redman ----- Original Message ----- From: "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, November 13, 2004 8:41 PM Subject: Re: Actions and pipe speech onset     > I suspect that the only change in speach possible with a mechanical = action > would be in a less desirable direction. With a good electro-pneumatic action > and a properly voiced pipe, there is a good attack and a good release every > time, and a tracker can either be as good as that or less good. No doubt it > feels good to the player to be in such intimate connection with the = sound of > the instrument, but if a careless release can "make listening quite > unpleasant", then give me an e-p chest! Kip in MO > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Saturday, November 13, 2004 4:53 PM > Subject: RE: Actions and pipe speech onset > > > > On a typical Scandinavian tracker organ of 5-25 stops > > from the 80's and 90's, the touch actually makes a > > noticeable difference. The release is especially > > important -- a too abrubt release can make listening > > quite unpleasant after a while. Harpsichord experience > > seems to be quite helpful when playing these > > instruments. > > > > - Jarle > > http://jarle.moo.no > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > > > > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > >    
(back) Subject: RE: Concerted music style of playing From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 17:12:07 +1300   [snip] > been wondering why it is that Tim, and others, play the whole of a Bach Prelude or Fugue on the same manual and on the same registration throughout. [snip] >As a provocative "opener," I wonder why they bothered having contrasted choruses if they were not used in the great works.   >Is it me?   Colin, I'm sure there that in the organ world, as in all other areas of = the arts and music, there is a certain snobbery school that says, "If you = enjoy it and it's not boring, you can't be doing it correctly." The converse is, of course, true, that if it is dreary and dull, it must be historically accurate and exactly as the composer intended.   I can think of the great Bach "Wedge" in e minor. I've heard this played full blast all the way through with no registration changes at all. And = I've also heard it with episodes and sections on other manuals and = registrations - to my great delight.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Actions and pipe speech onset From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 22:50:46 -0600 (Central Standard Time)   Colin Mitchell wrote: -------Original Message------- Hello, > I am in awe of the ingenuity Richard demonstrates! Thanks, I guess. In my previous post, I forgot to mention the fact that this organ can be viewed on-line at the following URL address: http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com/farmercity/default.html This will give a better idea of what was going on and "flesh-out" my = layout description a bit better! Faithfully, Richard Schneider  
(back) Subject: Today's Music From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 23:13:25 -0600   Sunday, November 14, 2004 Holy Communion, Reception of New Members, and Dedication of Time, Talents, and Treasures followed by Annual Thanksgiving Dinner with ALL the = trimmings!   The Rev. Dr. Basaam J. Abdallah, Pastor and Presiding Minister     Prelude- =93Thanksgiving" (Four Prayers in Tone) Richard Purvis Processional- WOV 762 =93O Day of Peace=94 JERUSALEM Hymn of the Day- LBW 355 =93Through the Night of Doubt and Sorrow=94 = EBENEEZER (Intro by Paul Manz) Offertory- "Simple Gifts" arr. Cota (Handbell Choir) Communion- LBW 312 =93Once He Came in Blessing=94 LBW 478 =93Come, oh come, O Quickening Spirit=94 WOV 771 =93Great Is Thy Faithfulness=94 Sending- LBW 364 =93Son of God, Eternal Savior=94 Postlude- =93Fest-Hymnus" Carl Piutti   Blessings, Beau Surratt Director of Music and Organist First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324