PipeChat Digest #4908 - Monday, November 15, 2004
 
Re: Free reeds
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re: Caleb Simper p.s.
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Caleb Simper p.s.
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Concerted music style of playing
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Church Music Summit ...VERY LONG
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: "Concerted music style of playing"
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
"Concerted music style of playing"
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: smokin' A***ns
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: "Concerted music style of playing"
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: "Concerted music style of playing"
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: "Concerted music style of playing"
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Pipechat IRC, - Tonight at 9.00 pm Eastern Time
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Dancing Corn
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
AC/DC Dakota organ
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Dancing Corn
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Dancing Corn
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Church Music Summit...VERY LONG
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass.
  by "Michele Landry" <mmlandry@syd.eastlink.ca>
Felix Hell and Symphony Hall Open House
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Free reeds From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 09:10:33 -0500   The 16' Euphone on the Great in the Roosevelt at the First Congregational Church in Great Barrington, MA is a free reed with large resonators- it is the manual 16' reed, and does pretty well; it's not a soft stop!   Paul Opel   http://www.sover.net/~popel/agomain.html      
(back) Subject: Re: Caleb Simper p.s. From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 21:36:29 +0800   Yes, John, as I remarked in an earlier post all of Simper's anthems used = the words of scripture as libretto. I was joking about the vision of fields dancing and singing. Bob Elms. ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 15, 2004 11:16 AM Subject: Re: Caleb Simper p.s.     > Actually it comes from Ps. 65: 14, so perhaps King David should get the > credit. Then there is also the hymn "To thee, O Lord, our hearts we > raise" > (A&MR No. 484), the last two lines of the first stanza of which read, = "The > valleys stand so thick with corn / That even they are singing." I dare > say > Caleb Simper had something about it too. Fields that are thick with = corn > do > actually sing and dance in the wind. >    
(back) Subject: Re: Caleb Simper p.s. From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 21:37:54 +0800   Yes, John, as I remarked in an earlier post all of Simper's anthems used = the words of scripture as libretto. I was joking about the vision of fields dancing and singing. Bob Elms. ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 15, 2004 11:16 AM Subject: Re: Caleb Simper p.s.    
(back) Subject: Re: Concerted music style of playing From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 06:25:28 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   That sounds like music to my ears Jarle!   It's amazing how an old organ, with a heavy action, is a discipline in itself. Even from that limited experience, Jarle will have instantly realised that we tend to play the music of Bach and his contemporaries far too quickly on our lighter modern actions.   I would make a point about unchanging registrations for Bach however. With careful attention to architecture and phrasing, a performance such as Tim plays on "Organs&Organists online" is perfectly musical and never dull or boring.   My quest is to discover the reasons behind the "no stop changes" approach, and whether it has a historic origin.   It just seems to me that the organ is an instrument of contrasts and contrapuntal dialogue, and I see no point in anything other than a single flue-chorus and a collection of solo voices if manual changes are now regarded as anathema to Bach.   Furthermore, the high drama of the brilliant "Bruhns E-minor"...one of my pet pieces...would be totally lost without tremendous dynamic contrasts and changes of registration.   I have to say, that I know not a single Dutch organist who plays Bach (or any other baroque composer) on single registration, and that is the one country where I have heard the very finest....perhaps most perfect performances of Bach and his contemporaries.   But then.....(never start a sentence with 'but' Jarle!)...coming to think of it, I have heard some of the finest performances of Widor, Saint-Saens and Mendelssohn (etc) in St.Bavo, Haarlem!!!!!   Work THAT out!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Jarle Fagerheim <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > > > The only restored historical instrument I've played > is the wonderfully > restored II/30 1742 Wagner in Nidaros Cathedral. I > can tell you that it > is a delight to play, even though the action is > quite heavy. In many > cases that's a good thing, because playing too fast > in the immense > Cathedral makes the whole structure a mess.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Church Music Summit ...VERY LONG From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 08:44:01 -0600   Good Morning, Desiree: =20 I love the enthusiasm that you brought home from=20 Charlotte. WOW!!!! How much better AMEN! sounds=20 when you say it. <grins> =20 F. Richard Burt =20 =20 ..
(back) Subject: Re: "Concerted music style of playing" From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 10:06:35 EST   Bach's free compositions are about structure and texture, and like the =   Third and Sixth Brandenburg Concerti, the composition of the "tutti" may = remain unaltered, so that variations in voice leading, density of voices, = harmonic sequence, and rhythmic figurations create the exciting changes in depth, texture, and mood. There is some evidence that many of these larger musical structures = were performed on plena that included 16' stops, with 16' harmonics, and third-sounding ranks, quite different from the thin, gutless sounds = created during the "Organ Reform." I find that both the intellectual stimulation and the passion of the music get lost when a Bach work is full of gratuitous registrational = changes, indicating that the performer is doing it for the sake of showing that = they CAN do it. Jarring changes of color, the swing of the expression shutters, and = the soloing out of single phrases or groups of notes just isn't necessary; the =   perfection of the music's architecture takes care of that if the organist = is a good musician. That's why Bach survives transcription, from Bream, to = Carlos, to Swingle.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ..  
(back) Subject: "Concerted music style of playing" From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 09:32:20 -0600 (Central Standard Time)   Sebastian Gl=FCck wrote: -------Original Message------- > Bach's free compositions are about structure and texture, and like > the Third and Sixth Brandenburg Concerti, the composition of the > "tutti" may remain unaltered, so that variations in voice leading, > density of voices, harmonic sequence, and rhythmic figurations > create the exciting changes in depth, texture, and mood.   <snip>   > the perfection of the music's architecture takes care of that if the > organist is a good musician. That's why Bach survives transcription, > from Bream, to Carlos, to Swingle. Interestingly enough: when I was in high school, it was the Carlos' transcriptions and virtually flawless synthesized performances that made this music; in fact ANY form of Classical music, come alive for me! All = of those things which Sebastian mentions above (variations in voice leading, density of voices, harmonic sequence and rhythmic figurations) were so transparent and crystal-clear in those renditions in that medium as to be astonishingly beautiful. Even nowadays, I often pull out the CD = re-issues of the Brandenburg Concerto (as a matter of fact: the Sixth Final Movement in particular!) just to immerse myself in the pleasure of so much = beautiful polyphony in such a short period of time.   While this may be treading dangerously close to falling off the cliff head-long into the "non-pipe" camp, I still have a very fond and warm = place in my heart for these early electronic musical efforts because in many = ways, while they DID emulate pipe organ sound, they did so without ever = PRETENDING to BE a pipe organ. Perhaps that's what made the entire effort and the music so rendered so magical, different, new, and thus: (IMHO!) = successful.   In many ways, I find that different performances of the same piece by a different performer on a different instrument will often-times make it = "come alive" for me in ways I hadn't heard before. I'm thinking now of a piece = of modern French music that I had not particularly cared for previously, but was fortunate enough to obtain a CD of that piece rendered on the St. = Paul's Cathedral Willis/Mander in London and because of the breadth of sonic texture (thunderous, if you will!) and the acoustics of that space, gave = the music a grandeur that I had failed to appreciate heretofore.   It continues to amaze me how any given piece of music can take on a life larger than its own and how it is performed can cause a person to either love or hate it. The Karg-Elert "Non Dankt alle Gott" is prolly the best-recognized example of such a piece that we've all doubtless heard performed both flawlessly well or butchered, depending upon the = skill-level of the performer.   Just some random early-morning musical thoughts while the "Coff-ay" begins to kick-in, FWIW!   Faithfully,   Richard Schneider  
(back) Subject: Re: smokin' A***ns From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 10:48:37 -0500   At 06:16 PM 2004-11-13 -0800, you wrote: >I was somewhat particular about an analog Rodgers I used to play, but it >seems to me I had about as many service calls on it as I did on a couple >of '60s Mollers in previous jobs. This was in the 1980s; the organ was a >750, bought new in 1980. > >Once we got the Allen 301-C fixed at St. Matt's (new key contacts, new >combination action), it was VERY reliable. I don't know about newer ones. =   >The church now has an Allen Renaissance, so I imagine I'll hear from my >spies if it gives trouble (chuckle). > >Cheers, > >Bud   Bud,   Being a service man on electronic organs, I can say that in general, electronic organs are reliable, and a number of them that I service have not had a single electronic failure. What older ones do exhibit is intermittent contacts on keyboards, or contacts breaking, lamps burning out, bad connections, speaker foam rot, to a lesser extent worn potentiometers, etc. Also quite routine I have had to tension = pedalboards, as they lose tension over time.   What does damage to electronic organs though is brownouts on the mains, or =   nearby lightning strikes. If they don't cause the organ to fail in some way, quite often damage is done. So they become a walking wounded, and components will fail periodically.   I service quite a number of instruments that are over 20 years old, that still work fine, just they sound like they were made in a certain period.   Every manufacturer of electronic organs faces the prospect of using components that are no longer available over time. Most manufacturers = will have a fix if need be, even if it means replacing a board or module that functions the same way. There are cases where even major manufacturers cannot fix an assembly that is broken down.   Arie V.          
(back) Subject: Re: "Concerted music style of playing" From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 07:48:48 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I "think" I agree which much of what Sebastian is saying, except that he seems to be blurring more than one issue.   It is wonderful how Bach survives almost anything, and the music comes trampling unscathed over the rubbish pile.   I would completely acknowledge the truth of the matter concerning "plena" sounds.....lots of gravity and richness of sound being quite authentic, and often very, very blurred to the ear. Naumberg is a classic, and a zillion miles away from the transparency of Schnitger.....but Bach didn't play a Schnitger did he?   With regards to changes of registration, I would suggest that a second manual is a necessity in something like the big B-minor or the G-minor Bach....perhaps ALL the big Bach works. THAT is a quite different issue to orchestral registration and changes of colour and dynamic on the fly....the Virgil Fox school of Bach. It says something about Virgil Fox and Bach, that it somehow "works" in spite of everything, but usually at twice the speed.   I just wonder if there isn't a school of thought, especially in the US, where unchanging registration is perceived as somehow more authentic than concerted dialogue between seperate (uncoupled) registrations, when almost everyone who plays the real old organs seem to make full use of the dramatic contrasts of timbre (rather than dynamic) available.   Of course, many will respond to the effect that the texture of the writing naturally alters the dynamic. Well yes it does,but I can't think of any Bach orchestral work where the instruments drop in or out for a chat without making a difference to the sound. After all, recorders, trumpets, timpani, strings and wind sections do not all sound the same, for God's sake!   Perhaps the "revival" hangover extends beyond "thin" sounding neo-baroque organ choruses towards a paucity of concerted elegance; to the extent that the G-minor becomes "the Great Famine & Fugue in G."   As my friend Sandy always says, "If you've got it, don't be afraid to use it!"   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > Bach's free compositions are about structure and > texture, and like the > Third and Sixth Brandenburg Concerti, the > composition of the "tutti" may remain > unaltered, so that variations in voice leading, > density of voices, harmonic > sequence, and rhythmic figurations create the > exciting changes in depth, > texture, and mood. >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: "Concerted music style of playing" From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 11:03:34 -0500   colin,   Another piece that benefits from changes in tonal colour is the great Passacaglia. To me it is a piece that calls out for terraced dynamics rather than an unending Plenum type sound.   Also the E-flat triple fuge (St. Anne I think it is called). I think it benefits not only from changes in colour at each transition, but also changes in tempo.   Just my thoughts.   AV.   P.S. It has gotten to the point where I find it uncomfortable to listen = to the same plenum sound for more than 7 or 8 minutes (max.) at a time. It usually just sounds boring.   At 07:48 AM 2004-11-15 -0800, you wrote: >Hello, > >I "think" I agree which much of what Sebastian is >saying, except that he seems to be blurring more than >one issue. > >I would completely acknowledge the truth of the matter >concerning "plena" sounds.....lots of gravity and >richness of sound being quite authentic, and often >very, very blurred to the ear. Naumberg is a classic, >and a zillion miles away from the transparency of >Schnitger.....but Bach didn't play a Schnitger did he? > >With regards to changes of registration, I would >suggest that a second manual is a necessity in >something like the big B-minor or the G-minor >Bach....perhaps ALL the big Bach works. THAT is a >quite different issue to orchestral registration and >changes of colour and dynamic on the fly....the Virgil >Fox school of Bach. It says something about Virgil Fox >and Bach, that it somehow "works" in spite of >everything, but usually at twice the speed. > >I just wonder if there isn't a school of thought, >especially in the US, where unchanging registration is >perceived as somehow more authentic than concerted >dialogue between seperate (uncoupled) registrations, >when almost everyone who plays the real old organs >seem to make full use of the dramatic contrasts of >timbre (rather than dynamic) available. > >Of course, many will respond to the effect that the >texture of the writing naturally alters the dynamic. >Well yes it does,but I can't think of any Bach >orchestral work where the instruments drop in or out >for a chat without making a difference to the sound. >After all, recorders, trumpets, timpani, strings and >wind sections do not all sound the same, for God's >sake! > >Perhaps the "revival" hangover extends beyond "thin" >sounding neo-baroque organ choruses towards a paucity >of concerted elegance; to the extent that the G-minor >becomes "the Great Famine & Fugue in G." > >As my friend Sandy always says, "If you've got it, >don't be afraid to use it!" > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK      
(back) Subject: Re: "Concerted music style of playing" From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 08:04:03 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Were these the MOOG synthesiser recordings?   If so, the MOOG achieved what many organs/ensembles could not deliver at the time....a certain clarity and regularity of line.   I think that was the secret of the success of these recordings, allied to some very fine playing of course.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Richard Schneider <arpschneider@starband.net> wrote:   > > Interestingly enough: when I was in high school, it > was the Carlos' > transcriptions and virtually flawless synthesized > performances that made > this music; in fact ANY form of Classical music, > come alive for me!   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Pipechat IRC, - Tonight at 9.00 pm Eastern Time From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 11:06:07 -0500   To all Pipechatters.   You are all invited to join in with the chat this evening, and every = Monday and Friday evenings.   If you have not joined us before, you can learn about how to log in by looking at the Pipechat Web Page:   http://www.pipechat.org/   Although it mentions Windows 95 and 98, it works for Windows XP just the same as in the previous versions. It also works for Mac's too. You can log on via the Web, but it is really far too slow, and is not advised!   Once you have found out how to log on, - we would welcome you to join us tonight or any other night, - the more the merrier!   See you there?   Bob Conway  
(back) Subject: Dancing Corn From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 10:28:09 -0600   So, Bud and Bob--can you scan or send me a copy of the Barnby dancing corn and some Caleb Simper stuff? I'd love to have a bit.   I imagine this stuff isn't in print?   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: AC/DC Dakota organ From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 08:36:48 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   My electronic is like a war-time DC Dakota, and sounds much the same. It is held together with bits of string, copious amount of solder, a few plastic zip fasteners, has lots of missing screws, a hash-up expression pedal bulb taken from an AJS motorbike circa-1955 and several more-or-less compatible components (+ or - 20%) which keep the thing alive......like friendly heart pacemakers. (I had to do a quadruple bypass on the pedal reverb)   Having great difficulty getting hold of phospor-bronze wire of the right gauge, I now find that the 5.1/3 contact rail is a useful source....I must now have the only "treble" 5.1/3 stop in the entire world, and I feel that the world is richer for knowing this.   In fact, coming to think of it, the organ is probably more automotive than musical-instrument technology these days, but the old wreck continues to function in spite of several moves, a bad re-spray, 3.5 million hours of abuse and the fact that my cat likes to lay on the keys and go to sleep.   Like a Dakota, it rattles. It is a pig to fly, has no creature comforts and every musical journey is a venture into the unknown abyss of potential disaster. In fact, my electronic is to music, what the film "Airplane" is to modern aviation.....but it's fun, and until I can afford an all flashing, dancing, thinking, state-of-the art, interactive, DIGITAL COMPUTER SYNTHESIS TECHNOLOGY replacement, I shall continue to live with it.   It has become a matter for some conjecture as to what or who dies first!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           --- Arie Vandenberg <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> wrote:   > > Being a service man on electronic organs, I can say > that in general, > electronic organs are reliable........   What older > ones do exhibit is > intermittent contacts on keyboards, or contacts > breaking, lamps burning > out, bad connections, speaker foam rot, to a lesser > extent worn > potentiometers, etc.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Dancing Corn From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 08:46:22 -0800   As soon as I find the notebooks with the master copies in them (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   First Christian Church of Casey, IL wrote:   > So, Bud and Bob--can you scan or send me a copy of the Barnby dancing = corn > and some Caleb Simper stuff? I'd love to have a bit. > > I imagine this stuff isn't in print? > > Dennis Steckley > Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Dancing Corn From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 09:07:11 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   We are all ears! Sounds a bit flakey to me!   :)   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Liquescent <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > As soon as I find the notebooks with the master > copies in them (grin).       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Church Music Summit...VERY LONG From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 09:21:11 -0800 (PST)   Richard Burt mentioned my enthusiasm. YES I came back with a total new look on things as a Sacred Musician. = After being exposed to tasteful, well written forms of Gospel and Renewal = music, I can honestly say that I don't think I would ever want to work for = a church that would not want this music. im a very discerning person, as = an organist. Im picky. That's what Monty and I were talking about last = evening is that this music by these composers is so full of substance, and = thats because its written by people who are classically trained. They put = that breadth into their writing. I can say that I would get bored if I had = to do Tudor anthems or Bach every Sunday. So, I don't want to work for = places that would require that week after week. I would love to be able to lead jubilant hymn singing from the organ, and = jump to a piano and get the choir thru something like Burleigh's Blessed = Quietness.     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass. From: "Michele Landry" <mmlandry@syd.eastlink.ca> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 13:46:34 -0400   Hello! I am new to this chat room and I live in Nova Scotia. My gggrandfather = who had the surname 'George' (John) and who came from Cardiff, Wales was = apparently a pipe organ maker and settled in Lynn, Mass.- 1800's. I was = wondering if there are historical records of exisiting pipe organs in = that area or how I might find records? It would be an interesting piece = to add to our family history. Can anyone tell me if this was a common = craft in that era or would he have travelled far and wide to assemble/ = build these organs? Who knows, there may even be one here in Canada! = Well, thanks in advance if anyone can assist. Michele in NS  
(back) Subject: Felix Hell and Symphony Hall Open House From: "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 13:00:53 -0500   I am sure most of you saw the posting on this event by Phil Stimmel but thought I would add a bit more, as a Felix Hell groupie, and a lover of the Symphony Hall organ. Felix had the opportunity to play the instrument in a solo recital and with the New England Conservatory Philharmonia playing the Guilmant Symphony No. 1. Felix played Prelude and Fugue in D, BWV 532, J.S. Bach, O Mensch bewein dein S=FCnde gro=DF, = BWV 622, J.S. Bach, Sonata No. 1, Op. 65, Mendelssohn, "Abendfriede" Op.165, Rheinberger, Prelude and Fugue in B. Op. 7 Dupr=E9, Consolation in D-flat, =   Liszt, Prelude and Fugue on B-A-C-H, Liszt. All played with Felix's usual flair and energy. I will also add that Thomas Trotter, James David Christie and Jeff Weiler also did outstanding jobs that day. I also noticed from my perch in the First Balcony, during the Guilmant, Maestro Levine was seated there in rapt attention. It was mentioned that there were at least 4,000 people in the hall during the day and over 6,000 for the entire event. It was indeed a gala event. Below is a review written by Richard Dyer senior critic of the Boston Globe from the Friday November 12 paper.   In "The Boston Globe" of Friday, November 12 (page D22) Globe music critic Richard Dyer wrote regarding Felix's recital performance at the Boston Symphony Hall of November 7:   "A young organist of staggering virtuoso gifts, Felix Hell, put the instrument through its paces in a recital that ended with Liszt's majestic ''Prelude and Fugue on B-A-C-H." Hell's playing of this great work was magnificent in the breadth of its conception and the finesse of its detail -- not to mention the thunderingly majestic climaxes summoned by flying fingers and feet."