PipeChat Digest #4909 - Tuesday, November 16, 2004
 
Re: Concerted music style of playing
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
Re: AC/DC Dakota organ
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: Concerted music style of playing
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: "Concerted music style of playing"
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Switched on Bach
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
organ piano duets
  by <tlevans95@charter.net>
Symphony Hall Dyer Boston Globe review
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net>
Re: Switched on Bach
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: organ piano duets
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Dancing Corn
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
yesterday's music
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: yesterday's music
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Recital by Ukrainian Organist (cross posted)
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
Re: yesterday's music
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: yesterday's music
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass.
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Church Organist Arrested [x-posted]
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Concerted music style of playing From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 12:14:47 -0600   Hello Colin,   Thank you for the compliment <blush> Most of the recordings I have shared =   of historic organs I've played were done without the benefit of having a console assistant or registrant. This may help explain the results. = Having played many historic organs yourself Colin, you might agree that = registering an instrument such as the Zwolle Schnitger or St. Bavo, for example, "on = the fly" without a registrant can be a daunting experience at best.   To answer your question regarding my interpretation of Bach's Preludes and =   Fugues, the best explanation I can give for my approach is my training. Having had very conservative teachers both here is the US and during my = time as an Organ Scholar in Germany, meticulous attention to the structure and character of the music was (and still is) the rule in registering the = organ. Other factors considered are the disposition of the organ, and the = acoustic environment. I try to avoid radical changes in registration in these pieces. From my point of view to do otherwise is unnecessary, and can be quite distracting for the listener. That is not to say that I don't = change registration, or utilize contrasting divisions and choruses of the organ = in playing many of the Preludes and Fugues. I certainly do, though subtly = and judiciously I think. An "old fashioned" approach? Probably so. Does = this make for a boring experience for the listener? I certainly hope not!   That being said, there are many organists who do use stark contrasts in registration, and all the bells and whistles of today's organs with mega levels of memory and pistons, swell boxes out the whazoo, crescendo = pedals, and other modern toys in performing Bach. I have absolutely no problem = with it at all. One can only imagine what old Bach would have done at the = console of say, Washington National Cathedral, St. Paul's London, or Passau if = such an instrument were available to him in his day! It's almost frightening = to think of ...   Cheers,   Tim      
(back) Subject: Re: AC/DC Dakota organ From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 02:32:52 +0800   If a picture is worth a thousand words, we need pictures! Is the cat's name cypher?   ----- Original Message ----- From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: AC/DC Dakota organ Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 08:36:48 -0800 (PST)   > Hello, >=20 > My electronic is like a war-time DC Dakota, and sounds > much the same. It is held together with bits of > string, copious amount of solder, a few plastic zip > fasteners, has lots of missing screws, a hash-up > expression pedal bulb taken from an AJS motorbike > circa-1955 and several more-or-less compatible > components (+ or - 20%) which keep the thing > alive......like friendly heart pacemakers. (I had to > do a quadruple bypass on the pedal reverb) >=20 > Having great difficulty getting hold of phospor-bronze > wire of the right gauge, I now find that the 5.1/3 > contact rail is a useful source....I must now have the > only "treble" 5.1/3 stop in the entire world, and I > feel that the world is richer for knowing this. >=20 > In fact, coming to think of it, the organ is probably > more automotive than musical-instrument technology > these days, but the old wreck continues to function in > spite of several moves, a bad re-spray, 3.5 million > hours of abuse and the fact that my cat likes to lay > on the keys and go to sleep. >=20 > Like a Dakota, it rattles. It is a pig to fly, has no > creature comforts and every musical journey is a > venture into the unknown abyss of potential disaster. > In fact, my electronic is to music, what the film > "Airplane" is to modern aviation.....but it's fun, and > until I can afford an all flashing, dancing, thinking, > state-of-the art, interactive, DIGITAL COMPUTER > SYNTHESIS TECHNOLOGY replacement, I shall continue to > live with it. >=20 > It has become a matter for some conjecture as to what > or who dies first! >=20 > Regards, >=20 > Colin Mitchell UK   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: Concerted music style of playing From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 10:42:45 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Tim, one gets to a point in life where to listen to a Bach performance twice is praise, four times is an accolade and a dozen times is reverence.   I have listened to you performances at least eight times, which puts you somewhere between highly commendable and divinely inspired I guess.   You are, of course, absolutely right about registering some of the old organs we both enjoy playing so much. It needs a small team just to play a John Stanley voluntary.   That said, I seem to recall that Bach played at least some organs with a vertical stop disposition, or at least within reach.   Anyway, it good to know that you don't have strict rules or a sort of puritan approach to registration. I have always admired the Walcha recordings, which somehow seem so right for the music.   As you say, in effect, the music and the architecture come first.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK                 __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page. www.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: "Concerted music style of playing" From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 02:50:00 +0800   Indeed!=20   They were the recordings to have. There's a complete discography at Carlo's= website: http://www.wendycarlos.com/. Also check out the WurliTzer II page= s. Loved the transcriptions, especeially Switched-on Bach, The Well Tempere= d Synthesizer and Clockwork Orange (not the original film soundtrack). Soni= c Seasonings was "different" and I've learned to appreciate it more over ti= me -- but 'tain't what I'd call music.   As a kid, I used to save my pennies and get the new releases as they came o= ut at Paperback Booksmith.   I like the late 60's recordings far better than the updated SOB 2000.   Somewhere I also have "Everything You've Ever Wanted To Hear On The Moog Sy= nthesizer, But Were Afraid To Ask For" Not as good, but it has nice renditi= ons of music from Carmen and Ravel's Bolero. Same vintage.   ----- Original Message ----- From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: "Concerted music style of playing" Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 08:04:03 -0800 (PST)   >=20 > Hello, >=20 > Were these the MOOG synthesiser recordings? >=20 > If so, the MOOG achieved what many organs/ensembles > could not deliver at the time....a certain clarity and > regularity of line. >=20 > I think that was the secret of the success of these > recordings, allied to some very fine playing of > course. >=20 > Regards, >=20 > Colin Mitchell UK >=20 >=20 > --- Richard Schneider <arpschneider@starband.net> > wrote: >=20 > >=20=20 > > Interestingly enough: when I was in high school, it > > was the Carlos' > > transcriptions and virtually flawless synthesized > > performances that made > > this music; in fact ANY form of Classical music,=20 > > come alive for me!=20   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Switched on Bach From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 10:53:33 -0800   One factor about Carlos' "Switched on Bach" recordings that people often fail to take into consideration is the way they were made. In the late 1960s there was no MIDI, laptop-sized multi-channel mixers, etc.   Each part of, for example, a four-part fugue had to be performed and recorded separately and then overlaid one on another -- like the old trick of dubbing a singer's voice singing all four parts of a chorale.   That Carlos was able to do these recordings so tight and seamlessly, making them sound as "all at once" recordings, is yet another testament to her brilliance and artistry.   Since "Switched On Bach" she has wandered far afield of classical music but doesn't ever fail to acknowledge the fact that J. S. Bach and Robert Moog put her on the map.   She's got a fascinating web site of course, www.wendycarlos.com, where organists may read with interest about her "WurliTzer-II" project. (Maybe this is the direction where pipeless organs could [should?] be headed?!)   I was quite amazed to read her comment that concludes that section of her site: "[T]he earlier direct mechanical or "tracker" style organ action provides a natural touch sensitivity, mostly of the attacks, which was lost when pneumatic, and then electrical action was added -- win a few, lose a few)."      
(back) Subject: organ piano duets From: <tlevans95@charter.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 19:08:37 +0000   I'm sure this has been asked before, but what usually happens when you = dont' need it is when it gets discussed.   I'm looking for organ/piano duets, preferably some transcriptions, I have = several more contemporary hymn tune duets that we are doing. Any info = would be greatly appreciated. Feel free to contact me off list if you = prefer.   Travis Evans    
(back) Subject: Symphony Hall Dyer Boston Globe review From: "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 14:55:55 -0500   I see that the Boston Globe does not make their archive available for free retrieval of articles so I will post the entire review Richard Dyer wrote for the Open House. Mack   AN ORGAN'S PRELUDE - Richard Dyer-Boston Globe November 12, 2004   "The annual Open House at Symphony Hall last Sunday afternoon focused on celebrating the restoration of the great Aeolian-Skinner organ. The dedication ceremony included remarks by managing director Mark Volpe and board chairman Peter A. Brooke that included tributes to the firm that carried out the restoration, Foley-Baker, Inc., and to the principal donors that made the restoration possible, Eleanor Lewis Campbell and Margaret Andersen Congleton, who were in the audience.   A young organist of staggering virtuoso gifts, Felix Hell, put the instrument through its paces in a recital that ended with Liszt's majestic ''Prelude and Fugue on B-A-C-H." Hell's playing of this great work was magnificent in the breadth of its conception and the finesse of its detail -- not to mention the thunderingly majestic climaxes summoned by flying fingers and feet. Jeff Weiler called on other quieter characteristics of the instrument in a deft, waltzy accompaniment he has composed for Buster Keaton's silent comedy short "The Frozen North." About 6,000 people thronged through the hall through the day"          
(back) Subject: Re: Switched on Bach From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 04:57:23 +0800   Also to note that since synth keyboards were a 1 V/octave voltage controlle= d affair, it was a monophonic instrument. I don't recall if Moog was high, low or last note priority, but touching th= at second key was bound to lead to an unwanted 'surprise.'   In response to an earlier post about how Bach can sound good on almost anyt= hing ... I used to love to practice Bach on a Rhodes Suitcase 73.   ----- Original Message ----- From: Charlie Lester <crl@137.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Switched on Bach Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 10:53:33 -0800   > One factor about Carlos' "Switched on Bach" recordings that=20 > people often fail to take into consideration is the way they=20 > were made. In the late 1960s there was no MIDI, laptop-sized=20 > multi-channel mixers, etc. >=20 > Each part of, for example, a four-part fugue had to be=20 > performed and recorded separately and then overlaid one on=20 > another -- like the old trick of dubbing a singer's voice=20 > singing all four parts of a chorale. >=20   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: organ piano duets From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 14:38:56 -0800   Look in Pepper Music's catalog on line ... they have most of the standard collections.   Cheers,   Bud   tlevans95@charter.net wrote:   > I'm sure this has been asked before, but what usually happens when you = dont' need it is when it gets discussed. > > I'm looking for organ/piano duets, preferably some transcriptions, I = have several more contemporary hymn tune duets that we are doing. Any = info would be greatly appreciated. Feel free to contact me off list if = you prefer. > > Travis Evans > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Dancing Corn From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 08:15:04 +0800   Send me your postal again Dennis and I'll post a selection. Bob E. ----- Original Message ----- From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 12:28 AM Subject: Dancing Corn     > So, Bud and Bob--can you scan or send me a copy of the Barnby dancing = corn > and some Caleb Simper stuff? I'd love to have a bit. > > I imagine this stuff isn't in print? > > Dennis Steckley > Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >    
(back) Subject: yesterday's music From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 19:56:29 -0500   Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio Nov. 14, 2004 Women's Thank-Offering Sunday   Prelude: Pr=E9lude et Fugue pour grand orgue Germaine Taillefer Anthem: Let All the World in Every Corner sing Norman Gilbert the women of the Zion Choir Offertory: Rorate Caeli Jeanne Demessieux Postlude: Postlude, from Little Suite for Organ Emma Lou Diemer   All women composers for the organ music, in honor of the ELCA's version of Women's Sunday. In doing up the notes for the bulletin, I learned that Taillefer's name was originally Taillefesse! Also that when she was in her eighties, in the 1970s, to make ends meet she had to take a job as rehearsa= l pianist for a private children's school in Paris--and yet she was one of Le= s Six.   Anyone else ever play her Prelude and Fugue? There were no registration indications, so I did what seemed best.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: yesterday's music From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 09:33:28 +0800   Delta Oaks Presbyterian Church Antioch, CA Worship service with Communion and Baptism.   THE MUSIC --------- Prelude:=20 - Lift Up Your Heads, Ye Mighty Gates (Psalmodia Evangelica)   Hymn:=20 - All People That On Earth Do Dwell (OLD HUNDREDTH)   Songs of praise:=20 - Because He Lives (William J. and Gloria Gaither) - Great Is the Lord (Michael W. and Deborah Smith) - He Is Exalted (Twila Paris)   Hymn:=20 - I Am Jesus=92 Little Lamb (WEIL ICH JESU SCH=C4FLEIN BIN)   Offertory: - Children of the Heavenly Father (TRYGGARE KAN INGEN VARA)   Hymn: - When I Survey the Wounderous Cross (HAMBURG)   The Lord's Supper instrumentals:=20 - O Breath of Life, Come Sweeping through Us (SPIRITUS VITAE, Mary J. Hamm= ond) - Breath on Me, Breath of God (Robert Jackson)   Hymn: - It Is Well with My Soul (VILLE DU HAVRE)   Doxology:=20 - Praise God from Whom All Blessings Flow (OLD HUNDREDTH)   Postlude: - When This Passing World is Done (MOUNT ZION)     -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Recital by Ukrainian Organist (cross posted) From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 17:43:50 -0800 (PST)   Dear List, Tomorrow evening, Tuesday, November 16 at 8:00 p.m. Ukrainian Organist = Volodymyr Koshuba will play an organ recital at St. Peter Church, 121 Main = Street in Danbury, CT. Mr. Koshuba is one of the most distinguished organists from the countries = of the former Soviet Union, and is an "Honored Artist of Ukraine". He is = the organist of the Kyiv State Concert Hall in Kyiv (Kiev), Ukraine, and = has been heard in concert in at least 27 countries on four continents. = Mr. Koshuba will perform organ works of Bach, Scheidt, Bortniansky, Mushel, and Vierne, as well as transcriptions of works by = Mussorgsky and Tchaikovsky. The recital is free, but a freewill offering = will be received. The organ is a three manual, 40 rank Peragallo from = 1994. I hope that list members in this area will attend. Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury, CT USA Director of Music, St. Peter Church, Danbury  
(back) Subject: Re: yesterday's music From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 20:42:13 -0600   Randolph, since my early college student days several decades ago, I = always spelled her surname (and always saw her name spelled) "Tailleferre." Where on earth did these spellings of yours come from?   Bob Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 15, 2004 6:56 PM Subject: yesterday's music       > Prelude: Pr=E9lude et Fugue pour grand orgue Germaine Taillefer   <snip> In doing up the notes for the bulletin, I learned that > Taillefer's name was originally Taillefesse!    
(back) Subject: Re: yesterday's music From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 22:35:21 -0500   You're right, it's Tailleferre. I just screwed up, sorry. I was having doubts about the spelling when I was typing the post and so googled "Germaine Taillefer" and a host of sites sprouted up. Unfortunately, I did not google the other spelling, though have done so just now and a plethora of them appeared as well. Of course, I could have checked the music, but I forgot I had brought it home from church.   But have you played or heard the piece? Actually, I have recently learned that there is a Chorale that should be played between the Prelude and the Fugue. I don't have that (yet). I saw somewhere that it was from the scor= e for a film called "L'Aigle des mers"--the Sea Hawk. Not quite sure how it would work as film music.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu         on 11/15/04 9:42 PM, Robert Lind at lindr@core.com wrote:   > Randolph, since my early college student days several decades ago, I alwa= ys > spelled her surname (and always saw her name spelled) "Tailleferre." Wher= e > on earth did these spellings of yours come from? >=20 > Bob Lind >=20 > ----- Original Message ----- > From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, November 15, 2004 6:56 PM > Subject: yesterday's music >=20 >=20 >=20 >> Prelude: Pr=E9lude et Fugue pour grand orgue Germaine Taillefer >=20 > <snip> > In doing up the notes for the bulletin, I learned that >> Taillefer's name was originally Taillefesse! >=20 >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass. From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 23:51:26 -0500   I have no idea the answer to your question, but I'm hoping that my = replying will spark others interest who may know more than me. I don't think = anyone will directly know the answer to your question, but may have some ideas of =   what organbuilders existed in the area at that time. A more specific year =   might help. Organs were definitely being built all through the 1800's in the Boston area and being installed all over the place. The typical practice then and now, would be to visit the client's building, design an organ for the building, build it in the shop, and then spend some number = of weeks onsite doing the installation. Thus, some organ makers would spend most or all of their time in the shop, others would spend all or most of their time on the road. In a very small shop, the same workers often are = in the shop until installation time comes, and then hit the road.   Two organbuilders in the Boston area in the 1800's spring to mind immediately... E. and G.G. Hook (started maybe in the 1830's??) and G.S. Hutchings (started, I dunno, maybe 1850's??). And where was Wm A Johnson located? That might have been Boston too, I'm not sure. I would imagine there may have been some lesser known builders around there. All of these =   would have had quite a few employees, and all have organs from the 1800's still playing all throughout New England and well beyond. I'll bet there was someone building organs in the area before 1830 as well, I'm just not sure who.   Any other ideas anyone? Let's be friendly! Its not everyday a = non-organist comes in here.   Andy     On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 13:46:34 -0400, Michele Landry wrote > Hello! > I am new to this chat room and I live in Nova Scotia. My > gggrandfather who had the surname 'George' (John) and who came from > Cardiff, Wales was apparently a pipe organ maker and settled in Lynn, > Mass.- 1800's. I was wondering if there are historical records of > exisiting pipe organs in that area or how I might find records? It > would be an interesting piece to add to our family history. Can > anyone tell me if this was a common craft in that era or would he > have travelled far and wide to assemble/ build these organs? Who > knows, there may even be one here in Canada! Well, thanks in advance > if anyone can assist. Michele in NS       A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Church Organist Arrested [x-posted] From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 21:51:58 -0800   Does anyone know Veronica M. McIntosh of Midland, Michigan?   SEE:   http://www.mlive.com/news/sanews/index.ssf?/base/news-0/1099061619281810.xm= l