PipeChat Digest #4910 - Wednesday, November 17, 2004
 
Re: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass.
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: yesterday's music
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Felix Hell in Wilmington, DE, November 21. Recital announcement
  by <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Marie-Claire Alain's New Book on Jehan's Organ Works
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Actions and pipe speech onset
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Actions and pipe speech onset
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass.
  by "Michele Landry" <mmlandry@syd.eastlink.ca>
Re: Switched on Bach
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass.
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
All four parts.
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
RE: Switched on Bach
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net>
Re: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass.
  by "Michele Landry" <mmlandry@syd.eastlink.ca>
St. Mary's Shrewsbury
  by <DionDave@aol.com>
Re: St. Mary's Shrewsbury
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: St. Mary's Shrewsbury
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: St. Mary's Shrewsbury
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass. From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 07:15:25 EST   Andy Lawrence wrote: >Two organbuilders in the Boston area in the 1800's spring to mind >immediately... E. and G.G. Hook (started maybe in the 1830's??) and = G.S. >Hutchings (started, I dunno, maybe 1850's??). And where was Wm A = Johnson >located? That might have been Boston too, I'm not sure Johnson was located in Westfield, MA, which is near Springfield, MA. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: yesterday's music From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 11:05:28 EST   westminster congregational united church of christ, spokane, washington:   prelude prelude in B major, op 99, saint-saens anthem hineni, lee kesselman offertory here am i, send me, frank wells postlude fugue in B major, op. 99, saint-saens  
(back) Subject: Felix Hell in Wilmington, DE, November 21. Recital announcement From: <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 19:28:09 +0100 (CET)   Dear listmembers,   this is to announce a recital of Felix Hell in Wilmington, Delaware.   Location: Sacred Heart Oratory (RC) 917 North Madison Street Wilmington, DE=20   Date: November 21, 2004 Time: 4 pm   The organ: Russell Meyer Associates from Bridgeton, NJ. 3 manuals, 35 ranks, 2256 pipes (rebuild of Cannarsa organ)   PROGRAM   Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude and Fugue D Major, BWV 532 "Jesu Joy if Men=92s Desiring=94 from Cantata No. 147 =20 Felix Mendelssohn (1809 -1847) Sonata No. 4, Nb Major, op. 65   Joseph Gabriel Rheinberger (1839-1901) =93Abendfriede=94 from op. 156   Louis Vierne (1870-1937) from Symphony No. 1 D Major Final   Craig Sellar Lang (1891 - 1971) Tuba Tune in D   Max Reger (1873-1916) Choralprelude =93Lobe den Herren..." from op. 135a HYMN Singing: =93Praise to the Lord the Almighty=94   Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) Fantasy F Minor, KV 608   Franz Liszt (1811-1886) Fantasy and Fugue on =93Ad nos ad salutarem undam"   For more information please feel free to call Russell Meyer & Associates. Phone: 856 - 455 80 38 or 856 - 459 34 24   Thank you for your attention.   Hans-Friedrich Hell  
(back) Subject: Marie-Claire Alain's New Book on Jehan's Organ Works From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 13:53:35 -0500   Jehan Alain left numerous manuscripts representing several versions of = each of his organ pieces. Marie-Claire Alain has comparatively studied the various versions and documents, and has compiled a book which follows the harmonic and rhythmic evolution of her brother's works and his concern for tonal color as expressed in evolving registrations. It is now in stock at the OHS Catalog http://www.ohscatalog.org and may be ordered on the = opening page.    
(back) Subject: Re: Actions and pipe speech onset From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 16:01:16 -0500         Folks:   Unless I missed it, no one here has discussed two other aspects of a mechanical action that are (in my own feeble little mind) more important than speech control. (I also happen to believe that the speech control is significant only in the finest of the smaller instruments.)   1. Tactile feedback: None of the best "Tracker-Touch" keyboards cannot begin to convey the exact moment of speech onset. In a mechanical instrument, the pluck point is the speech point. PERIOD.   2. Absolute control of speech cessation. There is absolutely no way to discern the moment that the pipe ceases to speak in any sort of non-mechanical action. The acoustics of the room play havoc with this. With mechanical action, the sound does not cease until the pallet comes to rest. This can be felt with the finger.   Add these two together and you get superior control over phrasing nuance. I have heard (on more than one occasion) the same organist play the same pieces within minutes on mechanical and non-mechanical instruments. The difference was quite noticeable to me and to the organists on each occasion.   However, it is also my belief that wonderful music can be made on a good non-mechanical instrument. Musicianship is the key.     Jim  
(back) Subject: Re: Actions and pipe speech onset From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 16:06:31 -0500     On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 16:01:16 -0500 Jim McFarland <mcfarland6@juno.com> writes: > > 1. Tactile feedback: None of the best "Tracker-Touch" keyboards > cannot begin to convey the exact moment of speech onset.     Please change that to read: None of the best "Tracker-Touch" keyboards CAN . . .       Jim  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass. From: "Michele Landry" <mmlandry@syd.eastlink.ca> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 17:43:43 -0400   Hello Andy! Thank-you so much for taking the time to detail the work of pipe organ makers. I will print this off an put it in the family file. In answer to your question, John George was born in 1807 and died in 1876. So I suspect that he was in Mass. around 1825 onward building organs. Your description gave me a good insight into what his life must have been like. I look forward to anyone else's sharing of information. Cheers, Michele L> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 12:51 AM Subject: Re: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass.     > I have no idea the answer to your question, but I'm hoping that my replying > will spark others interest who may know more than me. I don't think anyone > will directly know the answer to your question, but may have some ideas = of > what organbuilders existed in the area at that time. A more specific = year > might help. Organs were definitely being built all through the 1800's = in > the Boston area and being installed all over the place. The typical > practice then and now, would be to visit the client's building, design = an > organ for the building, build it in the shop, and then spend some number of > weeks onsite doing the installation. Thus, some organ makers would = spend > most or all of their time in the shop, others would spend all or most of > their time on the road. In a very small shop, the same workers often = are in > the shop until installation time comes, and then hit the road. > > Two organbuilders in the Boston area in the 1800's spring to mind > immediately... E. and G.G. Hook (started maybe in the 1830's??) and = G.S. > Hutchings (started, I dunno, maybe 1850's??). And where was Wm A = Johnson > located? That might have been Boston too, I'm not sure. I would = imagine > there may have been some lesser known builders around there. All of = these > would have had quite a few employees, and all have organs from the = 1800's   > still playing all throughout New England and well beyond. I'll bet = there > was someone building organs in the area before 1830 as well, I'm just = not > sure who. > > Any other ideas anyone? Let's be friendly! Its not everyday a non-organist > comes in here. > > Andy > > > On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 13:46:34 -0400, Michele Landry wrote > > Hello! > > I am new to this chat room and I live in Nova Scotia. My > > gggrandfather who had the surname 'George' (John) and who came from > > Cardiff, Wales was apparently a pipe organ maker and settled in Lynn, > > Mass.- 1800's. I was wondering if there are historical records of > > exisiting pipe organs in that area or how I might find records? It > > would be an interesting piece to add to our family history. Can > > anyone tell me if this was a common craft in that era or would he > > have travelled far and wide to assemble/ build these organs? Who > > knows, there may even be one here in Canada! Well, thanks in advance > > if anyone can assist. Michele in NS > > > > A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service > PO Box 111 > Burlington, VT 05402 > (802)578-3936 > Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Switched on Bach From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 17:11:45 -0500   On 11/15/04 3:57 PM, "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> wrote:   > like the old trick of dubbing a singer's voice singing all four parts of = a > chorale.   I know what you're talking about; but I'm a bass. I can't SING the tenor part. As for the alto and soprano parts---OY!!!   Silly question, but just how did "a singer's voice" sing "all four parts = of a chorale," even assuming sequential dubbing?   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass. From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 17:19:48 -0500   I should have mentioned the websites of a handful of companies building = pipe organs today that might interest you to find out what his work life may = have been like. In many ways, pipe organ building hasn't changed much, = although back then many builders had a more factory-like setting, where today it is =   often more craftsman orientiented... lower production. Neither is universally true, though.   Casavant Freres, Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec www.casavant.ca CB Fisk, Inc, Gloucester, MA www.cbfisk.com Russell & Company Organ Builders, Vermont (my former employer) www.russellorgans.com www.wicks.com www.glucknewyork.com (frequents this chat room) www.andoverorgan.com (not far from Boston) www.austinorgans.com (connecticut) www.letourneauorgans.com (Quebec) www.esteyorganmuseum.org (a famous, now defunct VT organ company, that was =   very much a factory)   .... and if you get bored with those there's 50 more ...   Also, chances are if you ask around some churches in your area who tunes their pipe organs (you are better off talking to the organists than the secretaries, in most cases), you can probably find an organ technician in the area who can give you a tour of an organ's "insides", which in most cases actually means being inside of the organ. An interesting place to = be if you've never done it (or even if you have! I haven't gotten sick of it =   yet!). ;) Andy   A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com    
(back) Subject: All four parts. From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 18:01:20 -0500     >Alan wrote; >I know what you're talking about; but I'm a bass. I can't SING the tenor =   >part. As for the alto and soprano parts---OY!!! > >Silly question, but just how did "a singer's voice" sing "all four parts >of a chorale," even assuming sequential dubbing? > >Alan   Funny that you should ask that, Alan. I have sung treble, (in my youth), tenor, alto, (well counter tenor really), but I never was able to make down to the bass line!   If there had been multiple recording techniques way back when I was a choirboy, and at subsequent times, I suppose that I might have been able = to sing three of the four parts. What I can say though, is that over the years I have sung three of the four parts of the Verdi Requiem, Messiah, and Elgar's Dream of Gerontius, - albeit, not all at the same time!   To be quite truthful, at our age it is a marvel that we can sing at all!   Cheers,   Bob Conway  
(back) Subject: RE: Switched on Bach From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 17:24:37 -0600   Of course "she" was a "he" at the time. His name was Walter.       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Charlie Lester Sent: Monday, November 15, 2004 12:54 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Switched on Bach   <snip>   That Carlos was able to do these recordings so tight and seamlessly, making them sound as "all at once" recordings, is yet another testament to her brilliance and artistry.   <snip>      
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass. From: "Michele Landry" <mmlandry@syd.eastlink.ca> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 22:27:33 -0400   Thanks again!- that is most helpful and I will visit those websites. ML ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 6:19 PM Subject: Re: Pipe organ maker-Lynn, Mass.     > I should have mentioned the websites of a handful of companies building pipe > organs today that might interest you to find out what his work life may have > been like. In many ways, pipe organ building hasn't changed much, although > back then many builders had a more factory-like setting, where today it = is > often more craftsman orientiented... lower production. Neither is > universally true, though. > > Casavant Freres, Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec www.casavant.ca > CB Fisk, Inc, Gloucester, MA www.cbfisk.com > Russell & Company Organ Builders, Vermont (my former employer) > www.russellorgans.com > www.wicks.com > www.glucknewyork.com (frequents this chat room) > www.andoverorgan.com (not far from Boston) > www.austinorgans.com (connecticut) > www.letourneauorgans.com (Quebec) > www.esteyorganmuseum.org (a famous, now defunct VT organ company, that = was > very much a factory) > > ... and if you get bored with those there's 50 more ... > > Also, chances are if you ask around some churches in your area who tunes > their pipe organs (you are better off talking to the organists than the > secretaries, in most cases), you can probably find an organ technician = in > the area who can give you a tour of an organ's "insides", which in most > cases actually means being inside of the organ. An interesting place to be > if you've never done it (or even if you have! I haven't gotten sick of = it > yet!). ;) > Andy > > A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service > PO Box 111 > Burlington, VT 05402 > (802)578-3936 > Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: St. Mary's Shrewsbury From: <DionDave@aol.com> Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 00:09:44 EST   I just spent two plus weeks in the U.K. An unexpected highlight of the trip=20 was going to Shrewsbury (a market town sort of half way between Birmingham a= nd=20 Liverpool but very near Wales). I went there to see the Pugin designed R.C.= =20 Cathedral (classic Pugin according to the experts and the architectural guid= e=20 books), but, the Cathedral was locked up when I got there. Disappointed, I=20 trudged back to the train station but couldn't resist following signs to the= =20 "redundant" Church of St. Mary the Virgin. I found the church. As I walked=20= about=20 the church, I glanced up at the organ pipes in the chancel and asked the=20 verger "Does the organ still work?". He said "Oh yes, yes, yes ... would yo= u like=20 to play it?". I with no hesitation said "yes". He then hustled back to the=20 vestry to give me the keys to the organ loft. I walked up an iron spiral=20 staircase leading to the organ loft. I picked up a Hymnal which was fortuna= tely=20 there and had a charmed hour exploring what is (in my opinion) a classic Bri= tish=20 Cathedral type organ placed in a now redundant parish church in a once=20 prosperous wool trade town. I don=E2=80=99t want to gush, but, I will. I pl= ayed very well for=20 the amateur organists that I am.. Actually, I just doodled by using cheap=20 tricks like using the tenor part of a hymn as the melody of an "improvisatio= n". =20 One could listen to the Great Diapason alone for hours and never tire of it.= =20 The full Swell had that rich blast of reeds overwhelming foundations when th= e=20 swell box is opened up and coupled to the Great. The color reeds like the ob= oe=20 and clarinet tickled the ear. The Solo tuba did its stuff. The 32=E2=80=99=20= reed=20 growled like a 32=E2=80=99 reed should. The 32=E2=80=99 flue shook the chur= ch and the loft. =20 However, the "whole" of the instrument was magnificent in spite of my talkin= g=20 about parts of it.   The church is welcoming of guest organists. When in England, take the trip=20 to Shrewsbury. You'll not be disappointed. If you're already in England, t= ake=20 a train ride to Shrewsbury. You'll not be disappointed. Dave Dion   P.S. The organ is a four manual with, perhaps, 60 or so ranks. The verger=20 delights in having organists use the instrument.  
(back) Subject: Re: St. Mary's Shrewsbury From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 22:18:40 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Good to know that Dave Dion enjoyed playing the organ of St.Mary's, Shrewsbury.   The organ he played was a J J Binns rebuild of the previous Gray & Davison instrument, and stands now as a 4/53.   The great sadness here in the UK, is to see so many churches closing and falling into decay. So many organs have been lost to us, I have lost count.   Dave may like to know something about James Jepson Binns, who set up as an organ-builder at the age of 31, in Leeds circa 1885? He had been head-voicer to Abbott & Smith; a remarkable company who did major work in my part of the world, and produced some magnificent organs tonally. Indeed, Isaac Abbot, the founder of the firm, was a top notch tonal artist, and a very rare example of his work can be heard about 8 miles from where I live. Abbott had worked with Hill, so far as I am aware.   So Binns came from a good background, both tonally and structurally, and whilst he built a number of mechanical action organs, the bulk of them were penumatic and extremely durable.   J J Binns was entrusted with the re-build of the world famous Schulze organ at St.Bart's, Armley, and this organ had quite a profound influence on him, even though he did upset the pipe-speech by fitting pneumatic action. This particular organ has now been restored to the Binns re-build, rather than the original Schulze, thanks to a heritage grant and a lot of fund-raising locally.   J J Binns was, without doubt, a "factory" organ-builder; turning out over 500 new organs from his Leeds workshop. He had a more or less standard formula, to which he adhered with considerable success, and the spcification of the Shrewsbury organ is as typical as they come. The voicing is always bold and bright, the reeds adequate rather than superb, but due to the fact that the reeds were never hard blown, they blend very well with the bright fluework, just as the Schulze reeds do at Armley.   A Tuba stop is a comparative rarity on a Binns organ, but if not "state of the art" Tubas, they are nevertheless effective.   Mechanically and structurally, many Binns organ with penumatic action continue to function after more than a century, and the Armley Schulze (with some 1950's primary re-leathering by Hill, Norman & Beard) continued to just about remain functional until a couple of years ago......that's about a century!   Locally, one of the very finest Binns organs is that of Shipley Parish Church,Yorkshire, where Dr Bramma (One time organist of Southwark Cathedral and now retired from Director of the RSCM) cut his milk teeth as an organist. Dr Bramma's choir at Southwark can be heard singing the Goodall 23rd Psalm as the opening to "The vicar of Dibley" on TV. The Shipley organ is an unusually fine instrument with an almost identical specification to the Shrewsbury instrument, but without the Solo manual and Tuba, and I have played it many times.   I suppose Binns, as an organ builder, would never be considered top-grade tonally, just as Abbott & Smith could never quite match the best of Willis or Hill, but my words, they are darned good instruments; well made, durable and worthy of considerable respect.   The only thing which puzzles me, is Dave's mention of a 32ft reed in the specification, which was never part of the original scheme. Could he have been listening to a 32ft electronic add-on? I very much doubt that the money would have been found for a real one.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- DionDave@aol.com wrote:   > I just spent two plus weeks in the U.K. An > unexpected highlight of the trip > was going to Shrewsbury         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Meet the all-new My Yahoo! - Try it today! http://my.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: RE: St. Mary's Shrewsbury From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 20:49:19 +1300   >Abbott & Smith; a remarkable company who did major work in my part of the world, and produced some magnificent organs tonally.   We agree, Colin. A few examples of their work in NZ, though not of more = than a dozen ranks each.   >J J Binns ....The voicing is always bold and bright, the reeds adequate rather than superb, but due to the fact that the reeds were never hard blown, they blend very well with the bright fluework, just as the Schulze reeds do at Armley.   We have a few Binns organs here, too.   There were a number of good organbuilders from the 19thC whose organs, = while not up the standard of T.C.Lewis, were nevertheless good solid musical workmanlike instruments that have lasted for a century or so with = virtually nothing ever going wrong. I can think in this respect of Forster & = Andrews, of Rushworth & Dreaper, of Halmshaw, of Holdich, of Gray & Davison (lovely flues with him), of Wadsworth and others. Not as good as TCLewis, as I = said, but at half the price or less they were darned good value for money, and still are if you could get one 2nd-hand.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Mary's Shrewsbury From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 08:25:20 -0000   Keith Orrell, Director of Music ....he has worked freelance as a conductor, choral trainer, choral = workshop leader, summer school tutor and organist at Shrewsbury RC Cathedral, ...   http://www.liverpoolmetrocathedral.org.uk/music/staff.html   Might this not be the man to ask regarding the organ in question ?   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a helpful musicman]